Mad About Plaid! (Vogue 8811, c. 1940)

Hands up who loves a good plaid?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I came across this plaid fabric in my local Spotlight, I knew immediately that it was perfect for Vintage Vogue 8811.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the dress has my favourite design detail – a pocket!

The Good:
- Everything? I love the drape of the skirt, the fit of the bodice, the fabric. Also, one of my best side zipper insertions.

The Bad:
- nothing

The Meh:
- I think I need to make a further short waist tuck, as it’s probably still a fraction long in the torso. I can live with it though.

Mods:
- Not using shoulder pads
- Made sure the plaid didn’t make a ‘+’ shape at my bust apex (boobs) as that would look awkward…. Hello girls!

This pattern is super easy, I’d definitely recommend it as a different way to use tartan/plaid fabric.  It’s also a great everyday vintage style, perfect for work.

As always, more about it on my blog…

Murphy’s Law Hat and a surprise HSF

I’ve made a cap and a headscarf but never a proper hat until now. The pattern was from the Vintage Pattern Lending Library a reproduction of Simplicity 1353 dated 1934. I made the caplet from this pattern for my first Historical Sew Fortnightly Challenge.  Incidentally Murphy also qualifies for the Historical Sew Fortnightly for Challenge #13: Under $10. 

The fabric is a raspberry colored suiting from Joann’s that I used for my 1936 Suit.

The lining is also from that suit and is just a poly/cotton mix. This was my first time working with crinoline and also using self covered buttons. The Self covered buttons were good practice for what I actually bought the kit for, a Frankensteined Ike Jacket, because I found out a ball pein hammer works better than the little blue plastic setter the kit gives you.  But let’s get back to the fact that this hat fought me the whole time I was making it. The fabric argued with me, the directions tricked me, I wasted at least 4 button backs, and I sewed every seam at least twice. Everything that could have gone wrong did go wrong.  One other fix I had to do was add a pipe cleaner to one of the seams because it kept wanting to collapse for some reason but I fixed that too. I kept hacking away at it and now I have a very stylish hat named Murphy.





The Challenge: # 13 Under $10

Fabric: Raspberry Colored Suiting Fabric and Purple poly/cotton lining.

Pattern: Vintage Pattern Lending Library 1930 Ladies Hat, Gloves, Purse and Collar Ensemble a reproduction of Simplicity 1353

Year: 1934

Notions: 4 Self Covered buttons

Hours to complete: About a week of on/off sewing

First worn: Not yet. 

Total cost: Pattern $15 but since it has four items I’m saying the pattern for the hat cost $3.75, Crinoline was $2.99, Fabric scraps from stash, Self Covered Buttons free, and thread was also from my  stash. So Murphy cost $6.74

Historical Sew Fortnightly Challenge #15: The Great Outdoors

For my second entry for the Great Outdoors challenge I made a red wool version of Simplicity 4366.

I love Ike jackets and I wanted one of my own for a while but then I found the red wool and decided that I would pay homage to the Ike jacket but make it my own. I have to give credit to Tasha from By Gum By Golly for starting the sewing bug for the jacket. Tahsa made a great 1940′s jacket for Rochelle’s Sew for Victory last year (2013) in a wonderful green fabric. From the moment I saw the jacket I knew I had to make one and here it is. The shoulders are gathered into a yoke and the waist of the jacket is gathered into a waistband. The sleeves are gathered at the wrist and finished with a cuff that buttons. The buttons are self covered and the red wool cooperated in waves that Murphy’s buttons couldn’t dream of doing. Oh and I swear the fabric is red the camera appears to have made it a bit pink.

The pattern called for self made shoulder pads but instead of stuffing them I used two layers of crinoline. The crinoline made the jackets shoulders keep their shape but don’t make me look like a linebacker (which I appreciate). The Jacket is also fully lined; the pattern didn’t call for it but I knew I wanted it lined because of the wool. I had to adjust the facing piece because of the change but that was a quick fix. For all of the buttonholes I used my grandmothers Singer 9134 which is cranky but works most of the time. I added the pockets to the front, they’re from Colette Pattern’s blog Coletterie and can be found here. For attaching the pockets I had to wing it since I don’t have the original Colette pattern the pockets actually go to.

The Scoop:

Fabric: Red Tango Wool and Medieval Blue Lining
Pattern: Simplicity 4366
Year: 1940′s if anyone knows the specific date I would be grateful
Notions: 9 self covered buttons
First worn?: Only around the house, it’s not cool enough outside to wear wool
Make again?: Yes but the peplum version in green corduroy with flannel lining
Total cost: Pattern $12 but I’ll say $6 because there’s a skirt pattern with the jacket, Wool Fabric $19.24, Lining $9.98, Self Covered Button Kit $5.99 so total $41.21

First self-drafted dress! A success!

I recently decided to stray from printed patterns and try my hand at drafting my own.  This is a pretty basic bodice style, but I’m pretty proud of how it turned out!  I used a stretch sateen to give the dress a little give and be super comfortable while dancing the night away! It has a full circle skirt with pleats of a leopard print sateen. The pockets and bodice are also lined with the leopard as well. Sorry I forgot to get better pictures before it got dark, but here are a few a took quickly before we left for a show.  (Modeled by the lovely friend who I made it for)

Black and leopard 50's dress

Black and leopard 50's dress

Black and leopard 50's dress

2 Frocks From Just Under 4 Yards!

 

3 3/4 to be precise! I saw this fabric at the shop and bought the bolt because I thought I liked it more than I did. With my hair color I can’t go wrong with navy anyhow!

Well, I made four frocks with the first several yards for custom orders (and they loved them, boy did they!) and with the rest of it I decided to make myself a couple of “practice” articles with patterns that I drafted. The first one I made was the shirtwaist that only took me an hour to draft and a couple of hours to make. It has buttons going down the entire front (a feature that I’ve always loved and shall never tire of ).  I made plenty of gathers at the shoulders to apparently broaden them and make the waist look more narrow. A great success, I look rather splendid in it (if I might say).

Blue4 blue5 blue6

The second frock is a maternity frock seeing as I am now nearly six months along. No, I’m not going to model either of them. I made some bias and put it on the front going around the back. It actually does open in the front where the button is. This was a fun change to the typical left side closure.

Blue blue2 blue3 It has quite an oriental look until I put it on, then it really looks 1933.  And bobs your uncle!

I must say though that this one I did not design and draft, it was a pattern for a house frock I’ve had for quite some time.

Thanks for having a look!             -Krystle!    1930slife.blogspot.com

Pattern33

1938 pattern

IMG_2499IMG_2492IMG_2497Finished dress! This one took me a month because I hated working on it. I put a lot of detail into it and I swore it would never end. I am so happy it’s finally done. From a 1938 pattern. Fabric is a stretch poplin, buttons are vintage glass.

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