Little dress blue

IMG_3664
A year ago I sewed my first dress ever. It was a retro style, simple, free pattern from Sew Mag and I just gave it a go. I liked it enough to make another garment based on it and here it is!

But before it came to be, I made a whole lotta mess that I never would have expected! I laid out the fabric, the pattern pieces, pinned them down, cut, sewed and everything was going smoothly and lovely until I first put the finished bodice on. Because, well, it was big. Like, a few sizes too big. I sighed while the cause of the problem unveiled in my mind: I’d forgotten this pattern had already had the seam allowances added to it and I added my own. And so, long hours of ripping the seams and fitting and sewing again (and trying not to swear) proceeded. The final product of said long hours is fully lined, fits really nicely and the only real problem is the separating zipper that I partially fived by adding a button and loop at the back. I’m currently too lazy to insert a new zipper, especially after taking so much time to sew such seemingly simple dress.

IMG_3642dbl
I’m really happy with the result. It’s a beautiful, simple dress and I’ve already worn it three days straight, and am currently sitting in it as I type. Gonna squeeze every last drop of summer out of it while the late summer still lasts here in Poland. If you like it, take a jump to my blog for more photos.

I’m now scheming another dress from this pattern, with bodice altered to sport a smaller neckline peter pan collar. Stay tuned!

Now as autumn approaches…

…I thought I should make myself a dress to be prepared for dropping temperatures.

The fabric is a slightly stretchy light-yellow polyester-weave. As a pattern I picked this dress from the march 1940 issue of “Beyers Mode für Alle”, on the pattern sheet was also the pattern piece for long sleeves.

img002

I skipped the pockets because I couldn’t see the use of two very narrow pockets getting bulky right between my legs, there are few easier ways to ruin a dress.

DSC_0803wm

I removed a total 14cm underbust-circumference to make the dress fitting as it is now, before the whole bodice part fit very loosely. Another 6cm circumference was removed at bust-height and the upper sleeves. This and a higher hem was all it took to make a 194- pattern look as modern as this :-)

DSC_0807wm

yes, a ding at the zipper, I see this. But because it will be worn when it is colder I hope enough underskirts will fix it. If not I can still change this.

The length is a little short for 1940, I know. But the dress is so high-necked and well behaved, I thought it needed this length to look less severe, of course the pattern was a good deal longer.

DSC_0790wm

 

I hope you like it, more pictures and details on my blog,

love

ette

Tree Gown in Action

Back in the Spring I shared my reproduction of Charles James’ Tree Gown made for the 2014 Toronto Garrison Ball. The ball was at the end of March, but I’ve only just now got photos of the gown – and one I also made for a friend! – in action up on my blog. Just a little bit of a delay there ;oP

I thought I’d share for those who may be interested in seeing what the dress looks like on an actual person rather than my dressform, and get a sense of how it moves – though I do wish I’d gotten a bit of video of its swish.

IMG_2633

Hop on over to my blog to see (lots) more photos, from lots more angles, and my friend’s dress too!

Drafting Cigarette Pants

I’m not brand-new to pants (the first pair of jeans I made), but I’ve never drafted slim-fit trousers before and to be honest they’re a bit intimidating. So math!  Much fitting!  Wow!  But I have some great herringbone woolen in my stash (somewhere between a flannel and a boiled wool, very nice quality, from Gorgeous Fabrics a couple of years back), a job I can’t wear jeans to, and a sudden interest in late-1950s silhouettes, so I thought it was time to take on the challenge.

IMG_0401

Drafting discussion and fitting photos are here at my blog.  I made a couple of breakthroughs and (hopefully) did away with a major fit issue in every pair of pants I’ve ever sewn.  I would love some input from those of you who are experienced at fitting pants–there are some horizontal wrinkles in the back thigh that are still stumping me:

IMG_0431

Needs length in the back fork, maybe?

Vintage Inspired Sewing

I’ve been trying to break out of my comfort zone this year while still keeping to a vintage style, and I have two new pieces to share with you guys!
IMG_3410The first is a maxi skirt. I very loosely based it off of a 1970s Simplicity apron pattern, and I was terribly afraid it would end up looking like a skirt from the 1800s. But I think it looks quite nice with the gray top (inspired from a 1950s Simplicity pattern). I actually look forward to pairing it with a button down top for a more old-fashioned look.

IMG_3385The second is a look I’ve been working on and off (mostly off) over the past year and a half. I really wanted to make a 1930s ballgown, but couldn’t make peace with the price tags I saw on etsy so I designed and drafted my own. I wanted to give it more of a mermaid tail, but I’m terrible at measuring myself before cutting. (And anyway, I don’t think you’d be able to notice because of the wind.)IMG_3391

I have my notes and a tutorial up for the maxi skirt. I just have my notes up for the maxi dress, but if there’s interest, let me know and I’ll post a tutorial for it as well! Hope you enjoy! :-D

1919-20 Madeleine Vionnet Handkerchief Dress (Japanese Bunka Book pattern #3)

vionnet3-19I’m back with another Vionnet dress! This time it is pattern #3 from the Japanese Bunka Book, but actually has quite the presence already online as I found an existing tutorial here. The dress is from around 1919-1920 and is made of four squarish pieces of fabric which give you four “flaps” (or jabots I think is the official term) on each side of your body, a deep V neck on the front and back, twisted shoulder straps, and a sash to tie it all together.

vionnet3-30These post it notes should give you a clearer idea about this dress’ construction as it is a bit difficult to explain. The creases represent the side seams and the mini diamond in the front represents the “ripple” that forms from each flap on each side.

vionnet3-11A photo of the real dress opened up – does the paper model make more sense now?

vionnet3-15The beautiful thing about this dess is that although it is 1 pattern, 1 dress, it has a ton of different ways of wearing it. You can do a drop waist, an empire waist, a full front, a full back, a voluminous version, a halter neck version, etc…  In this particular version I made all the flaps point toward the back to create a ton of ripples and more volume in the back. It’s a really simple dress to sew as there are 6 seams total (4 sides, 2 shoulder) BUT it is not so fun to hem as you have 4 giant squares. This was a muslin so I did a shoddy job of hemming, but for a real version I would need to be a master of the narrow hem since both the wrong sides and right sides of the fabric are featured in this dress.

vionnet3-23 I’ve written more about the different variations and construction technique for the dress on my blog here, as well as more photographs if you interested: http://cathywu.com/journal/kalali/2014/09/18/vionnet-dress-pattern-3-1919-1920-handkerchief-dress/

 

Page 1 of 883123Next »Last »