wool

After many cold, winter days of just dreaming about this project…

I finally awoke to success!

I paired McCalls 3730 and a wool stadium blanket to sew up a fabulously warm and comfy jumper.  The pattern worked up easily with no major alterations.  I was smart enough to leave enough ease through the waistline so that I can actually breath and bend and eat.  And I even have enough blanket left over to make a matching bolero.  More pics on my blog.  Stay warm, Everyone!

{ 5 comments }

Plaid skirt

by Pimpinett on November 30, 2013 · 17 comments

in 1930s,1940s,Skirts

I’m finally getting somewhere with my everyday wardrobe. I tend to wear a few favourite garments all the time, and having something like two skirts and three tops that I love to death in constant rotation isn’t really ideal. All those favourites are getting worn out, too. I’m on a complete ban on sewing silly party clothes, with the one exception of a New Year’s gown in sequin seaweed that’s in progress right now, and for once it’s working. I just finished this plaid wool skirt and thought I’d show it off, mostly because pattern matching usually isn’t something I do all that well, but this turned out quite nicely. Nice to know that I can get a fairly large-scale plaid to match well enough not just horizontally but vertically too, in a fitted garment on a figure with a large waist-to-hip ratio.

 

The fabric is a mid-weight wool in a crepe-like, slightly textured weave, and this is a lined seven-gored skirt with five inverted box pleats.  The jumper is new too, made from a soft wool knit fabric that I bought years ago and already have two tops in. I have loved and worn them for seven years or so. They’re getting close to worn out now. My mom knit the scarf after a vintage pattern; I’m not a good knitter myself, sadly.

I have another meter of the plaid fabric, for a top or jacket of some sort. Haven’t decided on the details yet, but probably a fairly unstructured jacket for indoor wear, so I can wear it like a two-piece dress.

{ 17 comments }

Hello again! It’s been a while since my first post here, but I’ve been busy sewing and I just finished something that I think is vintage-looking enough that I can post it here… the Colette Ceylon dress! I was looking for a genuine 1940′s pattern to make, but didn’t find what I was looking for so I figured that a 40′s-style modern pattern would have to do.

I made this up in a a lightweight wool that I bought at a local discount fabric store. It’s 100% wool, so it’s quite warm, and aside from fraying like mad, was lovely to work with.

I had to size down the pattern, but other than that I made very few changes – just adjusting the shoulders and the shape of the back yoke.

I tired lots of new techniques, such as covered buttons and buttonholes (in retrospect, it might have been a better idea to start with a button-down blouse rather than a project that required 16 buttons and buttonholes, but this seemed like a good idea at the time. Ah well, it all worked out nicely in the end).

In case you’re wondering, the actual colour is somewhere in between the colour in the pictures of me wearing it and the flat picture. It’s not quite as dark as it looks in the photos of me wearing it, but it’s not quite as purple as the flat photo.

I’m really happy with how this dress turned out. For more details, including the facepalm-worthy story of why I have one too many buttonholes, have a look at the full post on my blog. Thanks for reading!

{ 12 comments }

I was at Hawthorne Vintage when I found the blue plaid Pendleton I used for my Peony as well as this more manly 1970′s beige plaid wool. I decided it was high time I created something more inticate (well, not necessarily more intricate, but tailored in a way that I was less accustomed to) and I purchased the Colette Patterns Negroni shirt.

I was also gearing up to make my Sew For Victory dress, which has a button-up bodice. I was nervous to try a shirtwaist dress for the first time using a vintage pattern. As always, the instructions in my Colette Pattern Booklet lead me through this Negroni project with ease and when it came time to make my Doris Dress, it was a breeze! I <3 colette.

Having only just 3 yards of fabric I went ahead and cut it out in size small. As it turns out, small men’s Pendleton shirts are in high demand in PDX. I found a friend who was interested in buying this shirt, even though I didn’t have enough fabric to make full-length sleeves. Yes, it is a bit awkward to have a heavy wool shirt with short sleeves, but as my mother said, “Men usually end up rolling the sleeves up anyway.” I think I did a good job of making due with what I had and gave life back to this bit of old wool, don’t you?

 

For more pictures and construction details, visit my blog. Thanks!

{ 1 comment }