vintage sewing pattern

It’s summer down here in Australia, so it felt like a good time to make Anne Adams 4705 (circa late 1940s/early 1950).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My version is made from quilter’s cotton purchased at Spotlight last year, and took about 4m of trim.

I’m pretty happy with this dress! It went together quite easily (except for all the hand-sewing of facings eep), and let me indulge my obsession for ric-rac trim!

The only major modifications I had to make were a sway-back adjustment to stop gaping, and to enlarge the hip pieces to fit my measurements.

Never skimp on making a muslin, even if it just confirms the pattern will fit you straight out of the packet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Would I recommend this pattern? Yes, it’s easy to sew (if a bit fiddly with the trim) and easy to grade to different sizes.

Would I sew it again? Possibly, but I have a few other house-dress patterns I’d like to try first.

As always, more on my blog :)

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Hi guys!

I recently completed McCall 6717 – who doesnt love a pretty 1940′s blouse? I’m trying to focus on the gaps in my wardrobe, and vintage clothing that I can wear to work is a must.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 My version uses viscose georgette, and it only took 1.25m of fabric (great stashbuster). The pattern is so similar to Gertie’s Tie Neck Blouse, that I modded both patterns together because the Gertie’s fit is really good.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 This pattern was really easy, and if I was to make it again I think i’d use fabric with a bit more body as some of the drape is lost in the softness of the georgette.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The best part of the pattern is the minimal re-sizing I needed to do, to get a 36″ bust pattern to fit my 40″ bust.  A full list of mods are on my blog :) .

x

Bex

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This project is in honor of a turtle friend that I made last weekend (more details on my blog).

I know that the color and geometric pattern on the dress is not an exact match to the turtle’s shell, but I associate the project with that turtle. Probably because of the yellow markings and the fact that a dress is sort of like a shell.

I used McCalls 2390 (one of the patterns from the free batch I received) from the 1960s, a vintage thrifted double-knit and buttons from G Street Fabrics.

The total cost for the dress was about $4.

I did make a few changes to the pattern. I altered the neckline, added a bit of width to the hips, and shortened the hemline.

If you are interested in more information or pictures (plus close-up photos of a cute turtle), please see this post. Thanks for looking!

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