1960s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

Simplicity 3345 redux – Some vintage maternity wear for the Vintage Pattern Pledge

By on February 23, 2015

Hey there! It’s been a hot minute since I had a sewing project to share with you all, but today I’ve got my first finished project of the year to show you! It’s actually also my first finished project for the Vintage Sewing Pattern Pledge of 2015, AND as just a little icing on the cake, it’s also a 100% pure stash-buster. I did not make any further financial expenditures for this project. Every single thing on it, from the fabric to the notions (and the pattern) was stuff that I already owned. While it’s not “technically” true, I am telling myself that this dress was consequently a “FREE” dress, which makes it even better and totally fits in with my attempts at stash busting and project budgeting this year. All good things.

Anyway, this is the second version of Simplicity 3345, the first of which can be seenĀ here.

I made a couple of minor changes, mostly taking the side seams in slightly, in order to get a little better fit on this one. I think by rights I probably should have done a full bust adjustment as well to get the fit really perfect, but that’s more work than I wanted to put in on something I was only going to wear for a couple of months (and be changing sizes the whole time anyway). I shortened the hem (from the pattern length) by about 5 or 6 inches, so it hits me just at the bottom of my knee like the illustration. I’m not all that short, and even with a three inch hem allowance you’d have to be 5’10” for this to hit you where it does in the illustration. I intended on getting pictures of this one on myself so you could see how it looks on a legitimately pregnant human, but my husband is never up during daylight hours and the tripod is broken, so Tabitha will have to suffice yet again.

The bow is actually a pin that goes on the playsuit from which I scavenged the red fabric (it was from the skirt portion of the playsuit, which I think I maybe wore once and decided needed to be put to better use), so I can move it around, which is fun. It looks pretty cute at the neck, too. The back sash pieces don’t perfectly line up with the front since I was working with the width of the previous skirt’s ties, but my usually super anal retentive self was ok with it because I was doing some awesome stash busting/recycling.

You can see where I had to piece the ties to get the length I needed for this, since the skirt ties were much shorter. I hand-picked the zip like I normally do, since it’s actually one of my favorite bits of hand finishing. I think they just look so much nicer, too. The zipper and waist elastic were also things I had in my stash already, which is why I went with a bright red zipper instead of a matching one, but I think bright zippers can be fun sometimes anyway.

Just so you can get an idea of what these dresses look like on a real person, here is a picture of version 1 from Derby two years ago. I was about 36 or 37 weeks.

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1920s | Dresses

The 1929’s dress

By on August 3, 2014

So, in the end I picked this design to sew for the 1920’s portion of my Vintage Pattern Pledge.

To make it a bit more wearable in 2014, I made it in black crepe.

I didn’t make any alterations to the pattern although I didn’t completely follow the (very limited) instructions. I made the neckline a bit more stable and cleanly finished than suggested.

When I first sewed top and skirt together, it looked like this. Which looks like a 1920’s silhouette but not like the drawing at all.

I ended up making a large pleat at the back which gave me a look much closer to that in the image. I’m still wondering if this is something they just didn’t in the instructions (which again, are really limited, just a few lines for pattern tracing, cutting and sewing) assuming the reader would understand or if it just illustrates my complete lack of understanding of 1920’s fashion…

Anyway, I love the dress as it is now and I’m sure I’ll enjoy wearing it.

More about it, including more pictures, on my blog

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