1940s | 1950s | Skirts

Parrot Print Gathered Skirt

By on November 10, 2016
Akram's Ideas: Parrot Print Gathered Skirt

I love big novelty print skirts! Novelty skirts are kind of a staple of 40’s and 50’s fashion.

While I do love novelty print skirts, I actually have very few in my wardrobe. Since I get my fabric second hand I don’t usually come about interesting prints, mostly solids or modest floral prints.

However, when I came across this lovely vintage (or at least old) parrot print fabric I knew I was destined to make myself a novelty skirt.

Akram's Ideas: Parrot Print Gathered Skirt
This print makes the prefect Novelty Skirt

Originally I wanted to make a nice full circle skirt but alas, I didn’t have enough fabric. So in the end, I did a traditional gather skirt with waistband.

While the light weight cotton or print may not be autumn appropriate I’m still very happy with this skirt and can’t wait to get some serious wear out of it this summer.

Akram's Ideas: Parrot Print Gathered Skirt
Can’t wait to wear this next summer

To read more about my process for this fun novelty skirt see my blog Akram’s Ideas (http://akramsideas.com/vintage-inspired-gathered-skirt-parrot-print/)

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1940s | 1960s | Blouses | Jackets | Skirts

Separates turned Suit

By on September 22, 2016
Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green

Back in spring I had planned to participate in the Vintage Suit-Sew-Along. While I never did get around to making a vintage suit per-say; I did manage to make this great vintage inspired suit.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
This suit is amazing!

My lovely green suit is made up completely of separates. I actually started this project with the blouse using Simplicity 1364.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
Yes, I know another Simplicity 1364 top

I wanted to make a skirt to go with the blouse and the Delphine skirt from the book “Love at First Stitch” By Tilly Walnes. This is my go to skirt pattern.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
The Delphine skirt is so easy to make

Once I had the blouse and skirt I thought this outfit was the start of the prefect vintage style suit. All it needed was a jacket to top it off.

Since I had limited fabric I deiced to make the bolero using Butterick 6354 pattern.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
This bolero really finished the outfit

This was the perfect paring of separates into the most amazing suit. I love this suit from the color the print. It may just be my favorite outfit I’ve made.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
I love everything about this suit

 

To read more about my process for making my lovely green suit check out my blog Akram’s Ideas (http://akramsideas.com/vintage-inspired-suit-green)

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1930s | 1950s | 1970s | Dresses | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

Vintage Inspired Sewing

By on September 19, 2014

I’ve been trying to break out of my comfort zone this year while still keeping to a vintage style, and I have two new pieces to share with you guys!
IMG_3410The first is a maxi skirt. I very loosely based it off of a 1970s Simplicity apron pattern, and I was terribly afraid it would end up looking like a skirt from the 1800s. But I think it looks quite nice with the gray top (inspired from a 1950s Simplicity pattern). I actually look forward to pairing it with a button down top for a more old-fashioned look.

IMG_3385The second is a look I’ve been working on and off (mostly off) over the past year and a half. I really wanted to make a 1930s ballgown, but couldn’t make peace with the price tags I saw on etsy so I designed and drafted my own. I wanted to give it more of a mermaid tail, but I’m terrible at measuring myself before cutting. (And anyway, I don’t think you’d be able to notice because of the wind.)IMG_3391

I have my notes and a tutorial up for the maxi skirt. I just have my notes up for the maxi dress, but if there’s interest, let me know and I’ll post a tutorial for it as well! Hope you enjoy! 😀

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Dresses | Modern Patterns

A 60’s-Style Moneta Dress

By on July 2, 2014

Since participating in Me-Made-May, my sewing focus has shifted to wearable, comfortable clothing with a vintage vibe, rather than the full-on vintage look that I absolutely love, but rarely wear. In the past couple weeks, I’ve made three knit Moneta dresses, and I’m pretty sure it’s safe to say that it’s my new favourite dress pattern!

This is my second version of this dress, and I modified it to look like a knit version of this 60’s dress:

To do this, I raised the neckline to a boatneck, moved the gathers to the side of the skirt only, and lengthened the skirt. In retrospect, I should have made the back neckline into a V-neck, and widened the shoulders a little, to match the 60’s dress. Maybe next time!

I used a floral viscose jersey, and lined the bodice with and off-white bamboo jersey. I’m reasonably happy with the fit, although the armholes are a little big and the bodice is still a little long (I shortened it 1 1/4″ for this version). I hemmed it with a stretch blind hem, rather than the recommended twin needle, and I think that it turned out quite well!

Overall, though, I’m really happy with it! I’ve worn it lots as a casual day dress, and I also wore it to my high school graduation ceremony, under the ridiculous gown that you have to wear. For more details and photos, see my blog post, and for even more photos, see my flickr. If you’re interested, you can see my first Moneta dress here, a simple green one with a tie collar.

Thanks for reading!

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Dresses

Completely reworked vintage crepe dress!

By on May 2, 2014

Hi! I have been sewing for many years but am new to this site. I love seeing what other people are making! I have been collecting vintage fabric for too long, and tend to use exclusively vintage materials whenever possible (unless it compromises the integrity of the garment, ie. thread).
For my first post I want to share with you something I finally finished recently that I am really very proud of. This is one of my favourite “reworks” that I have ever done. I found the starting dress at a local thrift shop. Though the style was.. let’s say dowdy (see bottom photo for ‘before’ pic), I was in love with the fabric. It’s a really lightweight crinkly crepe, and the horizontal lace insets gave me instant inspiration.
I took the dress apart at the seams and decided to wing it without making a pattern. Started with the bodice, adding shaping via under bust gathers and a lightweight cotton for modesty behind the lower lace panel, and attached that to a flat 3-panelled waist section. The straps were a (possibly over-)zealous whim, with alternating opaque and sheer stripes made with pin tucks. I wanted lots of fullness in the skirt so I gathered both the top crepe and an under layer of the original lightweight cotton lining. I had a bit  of extra fabric left over so I fashioned a matching  rosette which slides on to an super long tie belt which is optional, I like wrapped haphazardly a few times about the waist. Closure is a hidden side zipper which just felt right with the whole retro vibe.
I really love how this turned out, especially considering the lack of planning! Not sure exactly what era I was channelling here, probably between the 1930’s and 50’s. Hope you guys like it!

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1930s | Applique | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

My vintage inspired wedding gown

By on February 3, 2014

Let me preface this by saying that this is my first post to date! I’ve been sewing for a couple of years and this was actually the first dress I ever sewed.
When I got engaged, I jokingly considered “just making my own dress” as a way to ease the financial burden that a wedding can cause. However, the more I thought about it, the more intrigued I was by the idea. When I finally decided, it seemed like the world was against me. But, that really only fueled the fire. I had sewn shirts and skirts so I knew a dress couldn’t be any more difficult…and it really wasn’t. Except for the fact that I bought real silk which meant I couldn’t get even a drop of water on it.
I was mostly inspired by Madeleine Vionnet and her 1930’s bias cut gowns. I loved the soft and feminine look of the gowns and the non-corset bodice. The flouncy bottom of her dresses also drew me to that style. I flirted with the idea of learning to bias sew but quickly laughed that off.
The more and more I sewed my dress the more I wanted lace on it. At the same time, my mom was offering for me to wear her dress from 1980 (not to mention she’s a half foot shorter than me and about 3 dress sizes smaller). So instead I decided to use the lace from her gown and incorporate it in my own.
I also decided to make a detachable train which I am so glad that I did. It felt so nice dancing around without a train dragging me down.

Here are some more photos of the dress. I used the delicate lace to draft sleeves and finished it with a small scalloped edge. The front and back bodice incorporated both the delicate lace and the wider lace. I trimmed the bottom of my dress in the wider lace and the front opening and bottom of my train.

Here is when the train came off:

Also I used vogue v2931 and took in the panels on the train, took off the bow and straps, and took in the top of the sloth as well. I also separated the train to make it detachable.

PennyandMary and DIYbride posted about it if you’re interested.

Thanks and I hope you enjoy!

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1940s | 1950s | Burlesque / Pinup | Lingerie | Vintage Sewing

Bullet Bra Sew Along

By on November 1, 2013

I recently completed the Va-Voom Vintage bullet bra sew-along! This was my first sew along and I loved it.  A bra was a great thing to start off with and Brittany’s pattern and instructions were great. I was really inspired by her collection of vintage bullet bras as well.

My first sew-along.

I added some faggoting stitch, a keyhole opening in the bridge, and some modern lingerie elastics and closure. Be aware, this girl is pointy!

 

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