Accessories | Giveaway | Vintage Sewing

A Tutorial ~ DIY Vintage Hair Tie

By on May 2, 2015

Remember the vintage styled hair tie I debuted in this outfit post?  Today I want to show you how to make your own version of this cute hair accessory! This tutorial is great if you have a hankering to try sewing, and would like a simple, easy project to begin with.

If you already have sewing skills, you can just download the free pattern for The Vintage Bow Hair Tie and jump right in!  {Note: You still might want to skip down to the end for the giveaway however!   ♡~ (^ ε ^) }

VBHT-Tut_21

Materials you will need:

  • Fabric:  92cm (36.5”) x 12cm (4.75”)  or  46cm (18.5”) x 24cm (9.5”)
  • Sewing Machine
  • Thread to match fabric
  • Needle for hand sewing
  • Fabric Scissors
  • Vintage Bow Hair Tie Pattern
  • Pins

Vintage Bow Hair Tie Pattern:  Download here

VBHT-Pattern_1

How to make your own Vintage Hair Tie:

VBHT-Tut_1

Step One:  Print out Vintage Bow Hair Tie Pattern twice, and cut out pattern pieces. There should be four in all.

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Step Two:  Join pattern pieces together as indicated.  The broken line tabs should go under the un-broken line tabs.  The last piece of the pattern, the rounded tip piece will have to be upside down to sit correctly.  The pattern should end up looking like a very long canoe!

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Step Three:  Fold your fabric over and place pattern on top.

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Step Four:  Slide any excess fabric back under so that the raw edge of the fabric is under the bottom edge of the pattern, and the fold of the fabric under the top edge of the pattern. This way, when you cut the fabric, there will be very little waste.

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Step Five:  Cut fabric.

(Option): If you have the smaller width of fabric you can ‘piece’ this pattern together by cutting HALF of the pattern TWICE as shown above.

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You should end up with a piece like the one on top if you cut the whole pattern, or two pieces like the ones on the bottom if you cut half of the pattern twice.

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Step Six (Option for pieced pattern):  If you have pieced the pattern, put the right side {the bright side of the print} of the fabric together and pin.

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Step Seven (Option for pieced pattern):  Sew along the straight edge to join the two pieces of fabric together.  Allow 1/4” to 1/2’’” for the seam allowance.

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Step Eight:  Fold the fabric in half ~ right sides together.

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Step Nine:  Starting at one end, allowing 1/2” for the seam allowance, sew along the outside edge of the fabric.  (Option):  You can sew this seam by machine, or by hand.

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Step Ten:  Leave a 1 1/2” gap at the opposite end to pull the fabric through the right way.

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Step Eleven:  Pull the fabric from the inside of the tube, turning it the right way out.

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Step Twelve:  Press flat with an iron.

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Step Thirteen:  Tuck the raw edge of the gap in and press.

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Step Fourteen:  Thread needle, and sew up gap. Start off by passing the needle from inside the fabric tube to the outside, so that the knot end stays hidden inside. You can use the “Stitch in the Ditch” technique to hide your hand sewing, as explained below.

VBHT-Tut_18

The idea behind the “Stitch in the Ditch” technique is to hide your stitches inside the seam, such that you cannot see the stitches once you have finished.  To stitch in the ditch, you pass the needle through the fabric that is tucked INSIDE the gap, and repeat a little further along on the opposite side.  Continue up the sides until the gap is ‘bridged’ by the rows of stitches.

VBHT-Tut_19

The hand sewing sits below the crease made by pressing the raw edges in, and when you pull it tight, it closes the gap and hides the stitches.  Knot your work, and pass the needle down into the seam and out through the fabric. Pull the thread taunt when you snip, and the tail of the thread will pull back and disappear into the inside of your fabric tube.  Invisible stitches!

VBHT-Tut_20

Step Fifteen:  Enjoy your new vintage-inspired hair tie!  A fabulous accessory for those ‘around the house’ days to keep your hair out of your face, or when you are fancied up for day out in your favourite dress.  Make a new one every time you sew up a project and you can have co-ordinated hair and wardrobe!

༺ ♡ ༻

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and have fun making your own vintage hair tie. If you have any questions about anything at all, please don’t hesitate to ask and I’ll do my best to help out.

As always, I’d love to see your creations so please do let me know about them ~ you can share by leaving a comment or link to a blog post, tweet a picture @bjvear or share on Instagram by mentioning @missbjvear, or hashtag #DIYLavenderandTwill so I can take a peek!

VBHT-Tut_21

༺ ♡ ༻

Now for the exciting part:

Giveaway

If you’d like the chance to win this sweet floral print hair tie, check out my blog Lavender & Twill for more details!

 

xox,

bonita

༺ ♡ ༻

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All patterns and instructions copyright to BJVear Studio. Available for personal use only, no commercial rights allowed.

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1950s | 1960s | Vintage Sewing

Green Shell Top Tutorial

By on May 19, 2013

Today I will be showing you a variation on Burda Shift Dress 09/2012 #107

This variation turns the top into a 50s/60s shell style top with a cross back. You can use Burda 09/2012 #107 or Collette patterns Laurel as your base as we only need the front and part of the back of the pattern.

If you have another pattern for a shift dress or plain top, you can use this too! I will instruct you to make this top to fit you so make sure you have your measuring tape and if you have one a dressmakers mannequin or packing tape shell (if you ever made one). I don’t have a mannequin and I did ok so don’t worry if you don’t have one


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Vintage Sewing

Make Your Own Bow Belt…

By on April 25, 2013

As promised, I’ve written a detailed tutorial on how to make your very own bow belt on my blog like the one I made for my striped dress.

23 Apr 2013 6

Bow belts are so easy to make and can add that pretty little detail to any outfit to finish it off. They are also great for using those scraps of left over fabric you have that you aren’t quite sure what to do with.

There are endless options for customising your belt as well. You don’t have to make the belt from one single fabric – mix it up and have a different coloured bow and belt, or a different textured knot on the bow. You can also just make the bow part of this tutorial and use it as a decorative feature on any number of projects from head bands, pillows and cushions, hair pieces, shoe clips…the list is never ending.

 

If any of you make one, I’d love to see them!

xx

Jen

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1930s | 1940s | 1950s | Accessories | Vintage Sewing

Handy Headscarf for Vintage Hairdos

By on May 31, 2012

I’ve just done a tutorial on hand sewing a headscarf to use for those vintage hairstyles.

I’ve actually used the one featured in the tutorial already to keep my curlers in place when setting my hair.

I’m a recent convert to the world of scarves. Not only (to quote jane austen) do they save a fortune in hair dressing but when not used as a hair accessory keep your neck warm. And if made big enough make a great impromptu picnic blanket.

I’m planning on getting some vintage inspired printed fabric to make some more. I do prefer silk over cotton for headscarfs but cotton over silk for neck scarfs. I like with making my own I can have them match outfits if I buy a little extra fabric for each project. Planning on making a neckerchief as well.

Its definitely a great way to use up scraps as well or make gifts.

All comments welcome

Find more info at

my blog

 

 

 

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Dresses | Pattern Drafting | Skirts

Whopper of a fishtail

By on January 7, 2012

I’m back! I haven’t posted since we were on blogger. Katherine’s done some brilliant work migrating us all over here, hasn’t she? Bravo. Finally, now, you can aggregate posts by author. I just looked through all my posts (63! Yowsers!) and the comments and got all overcome with the loveliness of the (We) Sew Retro community. You folks are ace.

Time to be giving back. I made a fishtail dress for New Year’s Eve and was shocked and delighted at how easy it was to frankenstein a fishtail onto an otherwise yawnfest straight skirt:

So I made a scrappy how-to that I hope will spread the good news. Hope you find it useful! I’m not any kind of drafting professional so I may have violated several tenets of drafting law… forgive me my sins and just gawp at the flounce! And please share your results if you test it out. We wanna see.

Fishtail skirt tutorial

 

 

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