top

Another 1930s re-pro pattern from EvaDress, I made these up a few months ago but finally got around to documenting them. I had started the blouse (not enough of the lovely rayon for a whole dress) ages ago, but the sleeve pleats got the better of me and then I got busy with other things. Once I’d figured them out though, I’m in love with the look.

EvaDress 1934 Frock

As I had an occasion to wear it, I finished the blouse and made up the lower portion of the pattern in a similar green coloured mystery fabric I picked up second hand.

EvaDress 1934 Frock (as separates) by HLB

EvaDress 1934 Frock (as separates) by HLB. Back view.

Cutting out the blouse and getting it to do what i wanted was a bit of a challenge. It’s a buttery rayon with lovely drape but frays terribly at the edges and slinks around when you try to sew it. I pinned it to within an inch of its life and took the time to hand baste as well as hand hem the bottom edge/ties, collar and  sleeve edges. Time consuming but a nice neat finish.

Sleeve detail. Self covered button and pleating.

Most people thought it was a dress when worn together, but I actually like that I can mix and match it. For another event I made a shorter black rayon skirt with side godets for dancing in.

EvaDress 1934 Frock (blouse) with self drafted skirt by HLB

I’ll definitely be making this up again with some strategic alterations. As always, do check out the full post on the blog.

~Heather

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my first edition

And my first 40′s  sewing !!!  So I have a challenge, make a sailor outfit with patterns from XXI era….

I hope I made a sucess

 

 

 

A skirt from Colette’s pattern and a top from New look…

 

 

It was a really pleasure to sew it and now to wear it

See more pictures on my blog 

 

 

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In my attempt to keep up with recent goals of making things for myself and also using my vintage pattern stash, I chose this 1965 blouse pattern – View 4:

1965 Simplicity 5885

This was my first button backed top pattern. I like the idea, but honestly I’m not sure why this was so popular, as doing it up yourself is a little challenging – and that’s without wearing a girdle as most likely you would be in this era. I cannot imagine having to do up more than 4 buttons this way without a ladies’ maid.

Modified Simplicity 5885 (1965)

Modified Simplicity 5885 (1965) Back view.

The collar was of course very high and tight, so I lowered it in the front to make it more comfortable. I also took in the side seams a little to give the blouse some shape. It’s actually a pretty boxy design – ok if paired with a nipped waist skirt, but I wanted to be able to wear it untucked as well. The nice thing about making up new garments from vintage patterns is that I don’t feel guilty when making alterations! The nearly finished version of this blouse was relegated to the UFO pile for months awaiting a solution to the excessive ease issue that did not involve completely re-making it. See the ‘before’ pics on the original post here.

 

Simplicity 5885 Modified centre front with pin tucks.

Simplicity 5885 with a skirt.

In the end, I ended up having to remove the collar tabs and most of the neckline facing. I took about an inch out of the centre front by way of pin tucks, which also help give it a nicer line. I also extended the back shoulder darts down to the waist to help pull it in a bit more. It’s still a little on the boxy side, and if I make it again I’ll be sure to grade the whole thing down from the start. It does improve the look to wear it with a skirt or high waist pants. In the meantime, I’m planning to try out some other quick tops for summer from the vintage pattern stash.

~Heather

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Just sneaking my last bit of vintage sewing into the end of 2013 – some basic women’s summer tops using Simplicity 2118 (circa late 1950s).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is what the pattern sleeve looks like – I went with View 1. Apparently they are bra tops – I couldnt image wearing this as a bra!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I didnt realise how versatile this pattern was until I made it up – it only takes an hour or so, and uses under 1.5m of fabric.

The pattern has plenty of ease, and I didnt need to do a FBA to size up  like I would normally (I have a 39 inch bust, the pattern is for a 38 inch).

The golden rod fabric I used is a new quilter’s homespun (mercerized cotton) from Spotlight here in Australia. It’s got a really nice polished feel to it, and comes in some fab retro colour ways.

I made it again in black poplin for my Christmas Day outfit, plus a 1940′s tablecloth turned into a skirt.

I would recommend this pattern if you can get your hands on it; easy, versatile and a great wardrobe builder.

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