1950s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

The Next Dress ~ Plotting, planning and scheming!

By on February 10, 2012

Start with one vintage pattern ~ Advance 9785.

Add a dash of floral fabric ~

And one excited me…

And you have my next dress project in the wings!

It wasn’t long after finishing my last dress{The On My Way Dress} that I began to wish I had another project to do.  Then I was digging through my stash trying to find fabric and a pattern that went together before I knew it.  The McCall’s I sewed up last time was obviously my first choice for a pattern, being the easiest and newest of all my patterns{most of which are vintage} but I simply could not find a fabric that worked for what I had in mind.  So I picked the biggest length of fabric that I cared the least about, a vintage pattern that seemed easy enough for me figure out using logic and decided to go to town!

This is my attempt at draping the fabric on Elizabeth, my dress form, to figure out whether this stripy flower pattern will work. I only found out while tracing the pattern that the bodice is cut on the bias whereas the skirt is cut on the straight grain…  I think it will look alright, but it’s going to take some really careful cutting to match this up nicely!   : S   Eeek! Scary stuff!  So tell me, am I being stupid tackling stripes and bias at the same time?  Keep in mind that I have never matched patterns before and I have only sewn one dress to date!

That’s another thing ~ is it easier to start pattern matching with small or large patterns? I sort of feel large might be easier, but I could be so wrong about that, it’s not even funny….   : \

….On the other hand ~ how cute is Veiw 2 with the chevron pattern on the bodice?  I am planning to do View 1 with the long sleeves as I felt this fabric has a more autumn/winterish feel to it, and Veiw 2 gives me a fairly good idea of how this might look in the end.

Oh, I am so excited to start sewing this up ~ I have to do the muslin next and after a tricky FBA that didn’t seem to work, I wonder how it will turn out…. Don’t worry, I’ll let you know if it’s a win or a fail!

xox,

bonita

P.S.  ~  For more photos, posts, outfits, and tutorials please come and say hi to me at my blog Depict This!   I hope to see you there soon.   ^ ω ^

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1960s | Dresses

New Year, New Dress

By on January 5, 2012

Even though I didn’t have anything more exciting than church planned for New Year’s Day, I thought a new dress would be in order. Continuing my pretty well-documented shirtwaist fetish, I tried out one of my latest eBay acquisitions, Simplicity 3580 from 1961. The pattern called for button links, and as luck would have it I had some nice vintage pearl ones in my stash! (They are really just shank buttons with a metal linky deal in between.) The fabric is some wonderful Tula Pink ‘Parisville’ I’ve been hoarding for the right moment. Yes, that is a Marie antoinette-style lady you are seeing with a fully rigged sailing ship in her hair.

I used five smaller buttons instead of the one giant button they suggest – since I had the lovely vintage pearl shank buttons, it seemed a shame not to use them. I also used some wide ribbon instead of making a covered belt, but other than that, I followed the pattern pretty much exactly. It’s a ‘proportioned’ size, so I took advantage of that by making the bodice in the ‘tall’ size, since I am 5’7″. I cut the skirt at a Medium and still had to hem it up 4 inches (I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, these patterns were drafted for Amazons) – next time I will save some yardage and cut the skirt at the Short length. Anyway, here I am all tricked out in heels and my trusty crinoline petticoat.

I love it, this dress was so easy to make (no side zipper!) and a lot of fun to wear. The only thing I really didn’t like is the one piece front facing/collar thing, it doesn’t lay flat no matter how much I press and understitch (but it’s a dark and busy print so you can’t really tell). I can see myself using this pattern again and again and switching out the collar and sleeves.

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