satin

Hello 1980′s!

by Inkdork on April 23, 2014 · 4 comments

in 1980s,Blouses,Skirts

So, on the 3rd, my boyfriend and I are going to an 80′s themed party and while I have a few things that might work in my closet, I wanted to really, really look the part. I had a skirt pattern I thought would be good, and I had big plans for coordinating my skirt and blouse, but I ended up going a completely different direction.

My blouse is from a 1986 Kwik Sew 1262 View A pattern, which I did in the worst fabric I have ever worked with in my life. Gold lame’. You so much as look at it, and it ravels strings of tinsel all over the floor. My sewing room looks like Christmas blew through it after making this blouse. I can die happy if I never have to use this fabric again and wish I would have gone the liquid lame’ fabric instead.  Aside from that, I did like the pattern, but would make it in a moderate knit next time. The sizing was a bit off- supposedly this was supposed to fit up to a 45″ bust, and I measure 42″ and you can see its pretty tight through there. Ignore the icky face I’m making- it’s super bright and sunny today and I was half blinded so not looking up.

The skirt pattern is View A from McCall 5184 from 2006, but without the flounce added to the bottom, and with an extra 2.5″ added to the length. I made this skirt up in another fabric as printed without the flounce and it was a micro-mini. A little too short for my tastes. Cute, but no. I’m 33 years old… lol. I made the skirt out of white satin, fully lining it as the fabric was a bit thin.

I stitched the zipper in first in a yellow thread, then once it was how I wanted it, used white thread and picked out the yellow. I’m really happy with how the zipper turned out, and even though its white and I’ve no idea where I’ll ever wear it again, I quite like the skirt.

I spent about $15 total on fabrics, the skirt pattern I bought years ago at Joann’s, and the blouse pattern I bought in a small lot, and it probably costs me about $2. Either way, I have the perfect outfit for the party, for under $25. I’m still undecided on shoes, but will be crimping my hair for the night and playing with crazy make-up. I make jewelry so will be making earrings and maybe a necklace, probably out of super bright polymer clay.

Anyway, that’s my share for today! I dont have this one up on my blog yet, but you’re welcome to pop by anyway! Deb’s In Stitches!

{ 4 comments }

Hello all,

The usual – long time lurker etc. I’ve been sewing for at least two thirds of my life and am a part-time seamstress for hire. I also work in the theatre industry as a Stage Manager and Props builder. I’ve recently been making things from my vintage pattern stock, some of which are posted on my blog, and others which will be soon!

I thought for my first post, I’d share a project that I completed in the fall for a good friend’s wedding. Since I’ve been on contract for the past few months, I’ve just recently been able to add it to my site. I’ve been getting into 1930s styles, and the bride is a long time fan of the era, so it was a perfect fit that we design her dress accordingly. As a prelude, I don’t normally do wedding dresses. I feel that there is a large pool out there and I’m only interested if it’s a special, personalized gown. My previous versions have included a light green dress, and a Sleepy Hollow themed wedding party.

I did lots of research on 30s gowns, and working with fabric on the bias. Here’s the finished gown on the bride – in the end, I could not get it onto my dress form as there were no fastenings. The bodice is entirely cut on the bias and fits her like a glove (a glove that fits obviously…).

Late afternoon light on a lovely lady.

Action shot.

Princess seams, a beaming Groom and a fairy flower girl.

The pattern was self drafted. Pearl beads accent the front and back neckline.

Bodice beading and a custom veil too!

A train was attached with pearl beads also, which was removed for the reception (for dancing and sitting comfortably).

The back View without the train.

For more pics and nerdy sewing details, see the full post here.

More fun projects to come!

~ Heather

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So, I found this amazing pattern for a smoking jacket from 1951, Butterick 1769. Despite being neither a smoker nor an idle rich guy from a Hollywood melodrama, my Husband decided he needed one in classic satin and quilted velvet. He accompanied me to the fabric store on a Saturday (an event never to be repeated), where he picked out this gorgeous Asian style brocade. We splurged and bought the fancy dress velvet to do the collar and cuffs. I made up a muslin sample, which actually fit him pretty good. I just needed to shorten the sleeves and he decided he would prefer a belt to buttons, so I drafted one. This is where the fun ensued. Slick satin just refuses to be sewn, especially when you are trying to meaningfully join it to any type of napped fabric. Sheer hell. Puckering. I ended up using tissue paper between the layers, which helped some, but not enough. I had to hand baste the batting to the velvet to do the quilting, which took forever and isn’t totally even. The piping was a pain, and in retrospect I should have used a finer weight cording. To top it off, I forgot to cut the back pleat into the lining, which I didn’t discover until I handed the jacket to my Husband to try on. I had to buy more fabric to recut it. Despite the hellacious and neverending trouble this pattern gave me, I still think it turned out pretty good. My Husband likes to strut around the house with a martini while wearing it, so mission accomplished. The moral of the story is that choice of fabric and finish details can make a BIG difference in your work load!

 

 

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Here’s a bustier/ bra top I made yesterday from Simplicity 3250. I made it from a 50 cent remnant of luxury satin, found in the $1 bin at my favourite fabric store!

Very comfortable to wear, it’s a one way stretch satin. I thought I’d be clever and sew the 2 ends together at the neck, saving me another set of buttons to wrangle with. The significance of those buttons becomes clear when putting the bustier on – it’s OK, I just have to get hubby to do me up at the back!

Anyway, it was a fun project.

{ 6 comments }