rayon

Another 1930s re-pro pattern from EvaDress, I made these up a few months ago but finally got around to documenting them. I had started the blouse (not enough of the lovely rayon for a whole dress) ages ago, but the sleeve pleats got the better of me and then I got busy with other things. Once I’d figured them out though, I’m in love with the look.

EvaDress 1934 Frock

As I had an occasion to wear it, I finished the blouse and made up the lower portion of the pattern in a similar green coloured mystery fabric I picked up second hand.

EvaDress 1934 Frock (as separates) by HLB

EvaDress 1934 Frock (as separates) by HLB. Back view.

Cutting out the blouse and getting it to do what i wanted was a bit of a challenge. It’s a buttery rayon with lovely drape but frays terribly at the edges and slinks around when you try to sew it. I pinned it to within an inch of its life and took the time to hand baste as well as hand hem the bottom edge/ties, collar and ┬ásleeve edges. Time consuming but a nice neat finish.

Sleeve detail. Self covered button and pleating.

Most people thought it was a dress when worn together, but I actually like that I can mix and match it. For another event I made a shorter black rayon skirt with side godets for dancing in.

EvaDress 1934 Frock (blouse) with self drafted skirt by HLB

I’ll definitely be making this up again with some strategic alterations. As always, do check out the full post on the blog.

~Heather

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I adore rayon! It’s the fabric I most wish would come back into modern fashion. I’m always on the hunt for rayon with a great retro style print and I fell in love with this divine polka dot yardage.

It’s the size of the print and the color that make this perfect for late 30s/early 40s rather than 50s/60s where polka dots often shine. I ended up pairing this with Wearing History’s Dahlia blouse pattern. Originally, I had a button down blouse in mind but once I got this fabric in my hands, I knew it was screaming to be something more drapey.

The version I made has a cute little bow in the back! And the back is longer to help it stay tucked in to skirts and pants. 1900s and 1910s blouses often have this feature and I have to say it’s quite handy.

I also love, love the neckline! It’s high but not too high. And the edge of the wrap is cut on the grain rather than the bias like most wrap dress/blouse patterns I’ve worked with so there’s no bias stretch to make your neckline gape open.

To finish off the look, I also whipped up Simplicity 3457, an early 40s 12 gore skirt, in some fine whale corduroy.

For a more in depth pattern review of the Wearing History Dahlia blouse pattern and more photos, feel free to pop on over to my blog.

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Rayon is perhaps my favorite fabric to sew with! Love it! And it’s absolutely perfect for 40s dresses!

When I saw this fabulous tropical printed rayon in the garment district in LA, I knew it had to be a 40s tiki dress! And I promptly bought 7 yds. lol.

I used Eva Dress 3863 from 1943. It’s a daring wrap dress and it’s available as a multisize pattern!

 

I did view 2! It turned out so lovely!

I really love this fabric! More photos and construction details over on the blog!

P.S. These photos are from a modeling shoot with a professional so that’s why there’s watermarks.

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The nemesis dress!

by oldfashioned on November 28, 2011 · 6 comments

in 1940s

This guy nearly never got finished….but i really don’t give up easily. And so I have dubbed it my nemesis, because on so many occasions it nearly bested me, until finally i did it!

The pattern is one from the 40s i think although i dont know any more than this- anyone?

see how pretty it could have been?

After all the trouble it cause dme i think i’ll have to wear it, although i’m not sure i like it at all!

Read more about all the trouble it gave me on my blog.

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