polkadot

In my attempt to keep up with recent goals of making things for myself and also using my vintage pattern stash, I chose this 1965 blouse pattern – View 4:

1965 Simplicity 5885

This was my first button backed top pattern. I like the idea, but honestly I’m not sure why this was so popular, as doing it up yourself is a little challenging – and that’s without wearing a girdle as most likely you would be in this era. I cannot imagine having to do up more than 4 buttons this way without a ladies’ maid.

Modified Simplicity 5885 (1965)

Modified Simplicity 5885 (1965) Back view.

The collar was of course very high and tight, so I lowered it in the front to make it more comfortable. I also took in the side seams a little to give the blouse some shape. It’s actually a pretty boxy design – ok if paired with a nipped waist skirt, but I wanted to be able to wear it untucked as well. The nice thing about making up new garments from vintage patterns is that I don’t feel guilty when making alterations! The nearly finished version of this blouse was relegated to the UFO pile for months awaiting a solution to the excessive ease issue that did not involve completely re-making it. See the ‘before’ pics on the original post here.

 

Simplicity 5885 Modified centre front with pin tucks.

Simplicity 5885 with a skirt.

In the end, I ended up having to remove the collar tabs and most of the neckline facing. I took about an inch out of the centre front by way of pin tucks, which also help give it a nicer line. I also extended the back shoulder darts down to the waist to help pull it in a bit more. It’s still a little on the boxy side, and if I make it again I’ll be sure to grade the whole thing down from the start. It does improve the look to wear it with a skirt or high waist pants. In the meantime, I’m planning to try out some other quick tops for summer from the vintage pattern stash.

~Heather

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Yes…it’s back the simplicity 4404 skirt pattern. But this time I’m actually going to make it stay high waisted by making the waist considerably smaller.

I’m loving the trend amongst the blogs I read for polkadot items.

I picked out a olive green fabric with white polkadot.

Combining it with black piping.

I have gone a little piping mad…it just looks so much better than just plain old bias binding.


 I may have slightly made an error with the waist facing.I forgot to leave a gap for  the zip opening….and didn’t sew up the centre point (that’ll teach me to think – I don’t need to read instructions…I’ve done this before). But with the addition of piping the it turned out my*wrong* was actually *right* in order to get it to sit right at the point. And for reference this skirt is entirely handsewn….ouchy fingers from having to sew through so many layers.

Not sure about how much additional decoration to do. I decided rather than pre making the piping and sewing it on the hem. I’ve done a little cheat to make it look like piping even though its just a bias bound hem.

I have already worn the skirt twice. Its comfy and is not too vintage to look like a ‘costume. It actually has had quite a few compliments.

More info on my blog

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Hiii!

This dress, made from Mccall’s 6006 (1945) has to be my favourite make so far! I am so so in love with 1940′s Mccall’s patterns – they’re just the best. What I love about this one is – the cool cap sleeves…If you could call them that. Maybe flutter sleeves? The tucks at the shoulder and back waist. The gathering on the front waist….The awesome gored skirt.

green-polka_0051

More pics and things over at my BLOG

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