plaid

Plaid and Velvet

by Joni on December 26, 2013 · 10 comments

in 1950s

This was a last-minute, impulse project – that’s the only way I sew anything for myself, to be honest. The pattern is Vogue 9059 – one of my favorite Vogues of all time. It took me the better part of two years to find it in my size for a price I could afford – I ended up getting it for under $25, yay! Even better, the fabric for this dress was totally free. My sister found a bolt of this gorgeous Ralph Lauren tartan sateen home dec fabric at a thrift shop and bought the whole thing. She’s made a few projects for herself and she also cut off a generous dress-sized hunk for me. Everything else, from the velvet to the zipper to the vintage belt buckle, was scrounged from my stash. (Know what this means? It means I get to buy some more fabric.)

My first thought was that the elegant yoke bands should be a contrast fabric – maybe solid white.  However, as you can see from the line drawing, the bands end at the shoulder seam; using a contrast color would have caused awkwardness there. (Design elements that end abruptly at a side seam = my absolute biggest fashion pet peeve. Remember all those awful Nineties blouses with the vest attached on the front only?) 

So the yoke bands were plaid, but I eliminated the button overlap and cut them in one piece so they wouldn’t be too busy. Totally unintentionally, the plaid on the top and middle bands matched perfectly. Nice! The bottom band didn’t match and I needed something there to break up the yoke seam, so I cut the bottom band out of some black cotton velvet instead. (The bottom band doesn’t reach the shoulder seam – as you can see, it peters out around the high bust area.)

This pattern wasn’t really intended for a plaid – I don’t think it was intended for a print material at all, actually – so I knew I was going to have to fudge it on the skirt. So I decided to worry about matching the plaids on the skirt front seam only and let the others fall as they may. This was my first attempt at matching plaids, and I was clearly affected with some sort of beginners’ luck, as it came out pretty good. We just won’t even talk about the other skirt seams, particularly on the zipper side!

And here is the dress in action on Christmas morning, complete with red lipstick and pearls and my new chiffon petticoat!

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tartan circle skirt

Seems a bit lame to post a circle skirt on here after seeing all the latest amazing vintage dresses on here. But hopefully it still counts as retro and hand made!

I really didn’t expect to get to sew much else before Christmas so I am so pleased it’s entered the wardrobe before 2014! It’s something I’ve had in mind for so long. I love what happens to the circle of tartan when it hangs like this.

And it goes without saying that it makes for a good twirl!

twirling in tartan circle skirt

I’ve been making a lot of longer, vintage length skirts recently so it made a change to wear something above the knee. More partylike, methinks!

tartan circle skirt

In case you are wondering, the boots are called Lola Ramona and are from Office. And my most favourite umbrella ever is from Love Umbrellas!

More deets and pics over at ooobop!

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Plaid skirt

by Pimpinett on November 30, 2013 · 17 comments

in 1930s,1940s,Skirts

I’m finally getting somewhere with my everyday wardrobe. I tend to wear a few favourite garments all the time, and having something like two skirts and three tops that I love to death in constant rotation isn’t really ideal. All those favourites are getting worn out, too. I’m on a complete ban on sewing silly party clothes, with the one exception of a New Year’s gown in sequin seaweed that’s in progress right now, and for once it’s working. I just finished this plaid wool skirt and thought I’d show it off, mostly because pattern matching usually isn’t something I do all that well, but this turned out quite nicely. Nice to know that I can get a fairly large-scale plaid to match well enough not just horizontally but vertically too, in a fitted garment on a figure with a large waist-to-hip ratio.

 

The fabric is a mid-weight wool in a crepe-like, slightly textured weave, and this is a lined seven-gored skirt with five inverted box pleats.  The jumper is new too, made from a soft wool knit fabric that I bought years ago and already have two tops in. I have loved and worn them for seven years or so. They’re getting close to worn out now. My mom knit the scarf after a vintage pattern; I’m not a good knitter myself, sadly.

I have another meter of the plaid fabric, for a top or jacket of some sort. Haven’t decided on the details yet, but probably a fairly unstructured jacket for indoor wear, so I can wear it like a two-piece dress.

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 Hello fellow sewists! I recently finished this dress and the sudden drop in temperature here in the bay area means I should get some use out of it soon. I was  inspired by this post by Jill of Tea With the Vintage Baroness.

The pattern is Screen Star Pattern 865 from the New York Pattern Company and the envelope features actress Helen Mack

I changed the cuffs to french style and used matching fabric covered buttons

I do so love a big 'ol 30's collar. Its so huge I think this could pass as a Pilgrim costume for Thanksgiving.

The main fabric is a heavy rayon crepe purchased at Britex fabrics. Its difficult to find rayon crepes that are really heavy so when I saw this one I didn’t hesitate. The plaid collar, cuffs and mock pockets are made with a vintage feedsack I bought at the Alameda Flea Market.

‘Till later!

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