bow

I’ve had this retro pattern in my stash fr what seems like ages and I’ve not yet sewn anything from it. Yesterday I sat down with a yard and a half of a pretty (but unfortunately polyester) fabric I grabbed at Joann’s a few days before. I knew this fabric would present some problems, mainly with it being really slippery, but I was not expecting it to literally disintegrate along the seams the minute any pressure was placed on them.

I stitched this up in a few hours, put it on, and as soon as I reach to grab something, the center back seam split completely apart. I took it off, and barely applied pressure to another seam, and it shredded apart too. Ugh! I wasn’t expecting that at all. After the seam shredding business, I busted out some bias tape and bound all of my seams, hoping that would  keep them together. I’ve been wearing the blouse all day today without any incidents, so it appears to have worked. We’ll see how it fares in the wash but I think it will be okay. In hindsight, I’d cut this with slightly large seam allowances and use French seams on it if I make it again out of a similar fabric- Its a close fitting blouse and there isn’t much easy at all in it.

The directions call for a button and loop closure at the neck, but I went with a hook and eye instead mostly because I have literally thousands of hooks and eyes and they were within reach.

I love the ridiculously large bow and the collar is really cute. I might make this again in a solid color cotton as I really like it, but not sure as its pretty distinctive. I don’t have this up on my blog yet, but as usual, you’re welcome to pop by and say hello!

http://debsinstitches.com/

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I made this dress to wear to a Downton Abbey inspired tea, but also as an entry into the Historical Sew Fortnightly Challenge #3 Pink.  The pattern itself is a repro of an original 1921 Butterick pattern and it went together very nicely.  For being such an old pattern the instructions were much better than what you find on BurdaStyle magazines, although they are wholly inadequate Big Four standards today. I used a poly shantung for economical reasons but other than that, the dress is pretty historically accurate.  Actually, it’s not a dress but a skirt suspended from a “long underbody” and then a blouse on top. I am very happy with how it turned out.  It’s not something I can just wear around but it served its purpose, and I think I’m going to use during Costume College for day activities.  For more pictures and a description of the Historical Sew Fortnightly challenge, please visit my blog.  I almost forgot, I made the hat too, using Simplicity 1736 and wool/rayon felt.

 

As a side note, I hadn’t made any posts since the blog was moved over from Blogger but I could have sworn I had an account.  Apparently I didn’t so I had to create one, and it’s showing that I have no other posts.  Bummer.

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A couple of months ago, I joined a sew-along. I thought it would be a good way to stretch my new skills. It was hosted by Seamstress Erin and I thought I’d share what I accomplished with you all.

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The most tedious part of sewing: cutting out the pattern.

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The point at which I realized I had not bought the zipper…

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Simplicity 2154 Details

  • Size: 8
  • Fabric: Flower print light cotton(?) with metallic detail
  • Lining: No, this project used facings.
  • Notions: Tiny black rosebud for neck detail, grey zipper
More details on my blog!
Thanks for reading!

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As promised, I’ve written a detailed tutorial on how to make your very own bow belt on my blog like the one I made for my striped dress.

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Bow belts are so easy to make and can add that pretty little detail to any outfit to finish it off. They are also great for using those scraps of left over fabric you have that you aren’t quite sure what to do with.

There are endless options for customising your belt as well. You don’t have to make the belt from one single fabric – mix it up and have a different coloured bow and belt, or a different textured knot on the bow. You can also just make the bow part of this tutorial and use it as a decorative feature on any number of projects from head bands, pillows and cushions, hair pieces, shoe clips…the list is never ending.

 

If any of you make one, I’d love to see them!

xx

Jen

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