1950s

Vintage Vichy Blouse Butterick 6217

By on February 15, 2017

Hi y´all,

dear me, it´s been a long time since my last post…but that´s about to change.

My vintage and vintage-inspired wardrobe is going to take shape over the course of this year, yeah.

A first is my new blouse, Butterick 6217, designed by Gretchen Hirsch.

I love the cute bow over the chest, especially as I am an A-cup gal, so this pattern was in my stash quite soon after it came out. It took me a while to really get to sew it up, but the result is really nice.

The sizing of the pattern proved to be a problem though. I cut exactly after the measurements stated on the envelop, but the result was a bodice much too big for my frame. Funny as it may seem, the armholes were too narrow, even on the bigger bodice!

So I cut it out again two sizes smaller, lowered the armhole about an inch and lengthened the bodice about two inches.


Now I´m quite happy with the result and there´s the idea of a second version in white already in my head…

Feel free to check my blog for more information.
Cheers and hopefully sooner than the last time.

Milan

Blusen: eine neue Liebe

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1930s | Blouses | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

1930s Bishop Sleeve Blouse & Pocket Detail Skirt

By on December 8, 2016

1930s blouse and skirt

Do you ever have an idea in your mind that never really pans out when it comes to your sewing? Yep, that’s exactly what happened here. Both the blouse and skirt were going to be very different to how they actually turned out, mainly due to not having quite enough fabric for either of them!

The white silk with navy polka dots is actually a vintage fabric I picked up at a flea market. It was very narrow and as a result, the originally planned pattern of McCalls – 7053, from their Archive Collection, just didn’t fit. So after abandoning this idea, I decided to use the top half of this beautiful original 1930s dress pattern instead. It’s been sat in my collection for a while totally unused, but boy am I glad I used it this time.

Vintage 1930s Buttons

It worked out beautifully in this fabric, despite having to redo the front yoke many, many times. The issue was that it needed to be lined to give it some stability and the join at the bottom, where the button placket areas overlap, was incredibly fiddly. After many attempts, both on the machine and by hand, I finally got it to sit right. However, after all that stress I gave up on trying to do buttonholes, so just sewed the buttons in place.

1930s sleeve detail

Instead of finishing the sleeves with a mid-forearm cuff as shown in the pattern, I decided to add a long cuff right down to the wrist. I absolutely love this style of bishop sleeve, it’s so classically 1930s, and of course keeps your forearms warm! I finished it off with four buttons and rouleau loops to allow enough room to get my hand in and out.

The fabric itself, unfortunately, has weakened during the pre-wash and making up stages. As a result, I’ve decided to only wear it on special occasions and to try and find another white and navy polka dot fabric for a more wearable version. I think it would work well in a crepe or a soft cotton lawn.

1930s blouse yoke detail

The skirt was drafted from another original 1930s pattern, which I’ve used multiple times as it’s such a simple design so can be changed to just about any style. The fabric is a deep mustard linen, which I bought from My Fabrics and a dream to work with. It’s quite a heavy weight linen so can be used for both summer and winter.

The design itself was taken from an original 1930s skirt I own but haven’t yet worn. I love the little pockets on it, so decided to replicate them here with a slightly different style button tab. They worked out quite well I think and give such a lovely interest to the front of the skirt, along with the deep single kick pleat on the centre front.

If you want to read more about it, and see the gorgeous original 1930s navy suede shoes I wore with it, just pop on over to my blog.

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1940s | 1960s | Blouses | Jackets | Skirts

Separates turned Suit

By on September 22, 2016
Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green

Back in spring I had planned to participate in the Vintage Suit-Sew-Along. While I never did get around to making a vintage suit per-say; I did manage to make this great vintage inspired suit.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
This suit is amazing!

My lovely green suit is made up completely of separates. I actually started this project with the blouse using Simplicity 1364.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
Yes, I know another Simplicity 1364 top

I wanted to make a skirt to go with the blouse and the Delphine skirt from the book “Love at First Stitch” By Tilly Walnes. This is my go to skirt pattern.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
The Delphine skirt is so easy to make

Once I had the blouse and skirt I thought this outfit was the start of the prefect vintage style suit. All it needed was a jacket to top it off.

Since I had limited fabric I deiced to make the bolero using Butterick 6354 pattern.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
This bolero really finished the outfit

This was the perfect paring of separates into the most amazing suit. I love this suit from the color the print. It may just be my favorite outfit I’ve made.

Akram's Ideas: Vintage Inspired Suit in Green
I love everything about this suit

 

To read more about my process for making my lovely green suit check out my blog Akram’s Ideas (http://akramsideas.com/vintage-inspired-suit-green)

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1970s | Blouses

Dig My Wide Collar – 1973 Simplicity 6110 Blouse

By on September 5, 2016
Simplicity 6110, copyright 1973

Simplicity 6110, Misses’ Blouse, Skirt and Pants

Seventies fashion always makes me smile.  I absolutely love the exuberance of this era’s designs:  cheerful, big buttons, the oh-so wide pointy collar that spreads from sleeve cap to shining sleeve cap, it all makes me grin.

S6110 frontAccording to the envelope, “This design has the new narrow shoulder look.  The shoulder length of the pattern is shorter and the head of the sleeve is higher.”

I sewed this up using Michael Miller’s “Little Lifesavers” quilting cotton.   This type of fabric is perfect for the way I wash and wear clothes.  That is to say, hot water, high heat in the dryer, and I’ll likely spill something down the front every other wearing.

S6110 back full lengthFitting was simple, as there is no bust dart.  Instead, the front is gathered into yokes.  By comparing the measurement of the pattern to a blouse that fits, I determined I only need to make a rounded upper back and swayback adjustment.

I also shortened the sleeves about an inch and a quarter.  Otherwise, they end at my elbow crease, making my waist look wide.  Between the wide collar and the short, cuffed sleeves, it appears I have a waist (I’m actually pretty square).

Can you dig my exuberant collar?
Can you dig my exuberant collar?

I wanted to emphasize the very pointed collar and cuffs.  I tried Pellon 950S, ShirTailor, which gave a crisp feel to both.

Sewing the blouse was incredibly straight forward.  The instructions are clearly written, and the diagrams quite helpful.

Cuff Detail
Cuff Detail

The oversize buttons that I love didn’t look quite right down the front of the blouse.  I happened to have two sets of the same orange buttons in different diameters.  What can I say?  I like orange buttons, so I have a lot of them.  The three-quarter inch diameter buttons matched the scale of the little lifesavers, and I like the effect much better.

But the cuffs, oh, man, the cuffs were made for the orange 1 1/8″ buttons.  The sheer exuberance of oversize orange buttons makes me so happy!

 

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1940s

Advance 5232 Blouse in Liberty Silk

By on April 10, 2016

A few days ago, someone on the WeSewRetro fb page asked if anyone ever used liberty silk, which prompted me to revisit and finish this blouse. I started last Autumn.  I had picked up some Liberty Silk a few months previous, and as it was relatively expensive and I was only buying it on a whim I bought .75m, which was really limiting my making options.

Advance5232 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I got this pattern on Vintage Pattern Bazaar and thought it perfect for the Liberty, which it really was.  I had to grade up one size, as well as taking a small bit of the shoulders as I was not going to put shoulder pads in.  I cut it out and it all just about fitted (the selvedge were incorporated into the back seam.  I also decided to sew it on an old Brother/Jones machine as it had a silk setting and I was curious to know what that was.  I soon found out it means sewing in tiny tiny stitches which ended up being a bit of a pain, and if I was to do it again, I would just sew on my usual singer at usual settings.  The main reason it was a pain, is that I also did the gathering (what was I thinking) and the top-stitching in this stitch.  The top stitching looked awful.  it made the shirt look ‘country and western’ style and as I was in no mood to take out tiny stitches, I popped it into my wardrobe so not to look at it for a while (head in sand etc).

Anyway, when the post came up on facebook, it was a timely reminder to finish the blouse.  I undid the top stitch and sewed the yoke underneath, and it looked way better.  I hand hemmed, and put a cream button and loop (I couldn’t remember where the fabric scraps were to cover the button and make a new loop – so now – blouse finished.  Liberty silk is lovely to work on.  the weave is very dense and fine (and very strong!).

WIN_20160410_18_18_37_ProWIN_20160410_18_18_00_Pro

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1950s | 1960s

Faux Crop Top (+ Tutorial)

By on April 6, 2016

 

Last year I happened to stumble across McCall’s 4933 (available on etsy here!!) and noticed that it was not a crop top, as it seemed, but a faker posing as a crop top. I couldn’t find it in my size so I did some sleuthing and the back of the pattern envelope shows that it is basically just an extra long top with a big tuck in it–I can do that! You can too!

I used my go-to crop top pattern, Simplicity 3480 which I think is from 1959 or 60. All you do is straighten out the side seams, making your top reeeeally long, and then take one big tuck at waist level to create the “overblouse” effect. It looks like the hem, but it’s really just a long pleat.

I’m a firm believer in wearing just about anything that makes you feel good, but if you feel like you can’t (or don’t want to) pull off a crop top for whatever reason, or you just want something a little different, is is easy to transform a regular top pattern into one for a tuck-in crop top. I’ve made a couple of these fake crop tops (or “tuck-in blouse with look of short overblouse” as the original pattern described them), and I loveeee them. They’re so easy to wear and offer good coverage while looking cool and, as my mom said, “neat and tidy.” You can see the full tutorial here!!

xoxo,
allie J.

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1950s | 1960s | Blouses | Dresses | Pants / Trousers | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

2 New Vintage Pattern Makes: Simplicity 3257 and Advance 8288

By on April 4, 2016

Hi y’all!

I’ve recently sewn/photographed/blogged about two new vintage makes. Simplicity 3257 is a c. late 1950s combo skirt/trouser pattern and went together really beautifully. I highly recommend it for the skirt, though I haven’t yet tried to sew up the trousers. The skirt only used three pieces and was very true to size. I enjoyed the instructions for certain vintage craftsmanship that we don’t often use today, like the lapped zipper. I’ve been doing it the “hard” way all this time!

s3257

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2016-04-04 at 3.10.24 PM

My other creation was inspired by c. 1957 Advance 8288. It’s a “sub-teen” pattern for coordinating separates. I LOVE having options and variety, and even though it looks like a dress I can wear each piece on its own! So wonderful. I didn’t actually sew with the pattern, but rather I used the art as inspiration and Frankenstein-ed two patterns from my collection to make the blouse. The skirt is a simple dirndl style with two side pockets. Both are made with vintage metal zippers from my stash, though the rayon fabric is new (from Gertie’s collection at Joann). My friend, who sewed up this project with me, did have the pattern and noted that it was simple to make but included a lot of wearing ease.

advance-8288

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Links to the blog posts for more pics + sewing/pattern details:

Simplicity 3257

Advance 8288

 

Thanks for looking!

xx Lauren

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