70s

 

Bubblegum pillows with Simplicity 8139 pattern (1977)

 

 

 

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Today I finished my 70s Boudoir Dress. I decided to name the dress after the fabric which it’s made of. 

I was really glad with how the dress turned out and was eager to take pictures of it. When I finished the dress this morning I tried it on and then the worst thing happened (well in a sewing kind of way), when I was closing the zipper, it broke! After all that work, my zipper broke :(  

I was so frustrated, I was ready to take pictures and now I didn’t have a finished dress. When I took off my dress, I made the zipper, after some tinkering, kind of work again. Luckily I could take the pictures after all. But I need to replace the zipper for sure, it’s not running smoothly anymore. 

After putting the dress on again it was time to take pictures. I started taking them inside, but the light was so bad, none of the picture came out pretty good. We moved outside, there was a lot of wind so I worried about the pictures again. But one of my cats came along and made my dat. She really wanted to be in the pictures. She distracted me a lot, but she also cheered me up!

Ok, what about the dress? I used a 70s pattern, but I think it has a 40s feel. I already made a wearable muslin so I was easy to make. The dress is fully lined with a white cotton fabric. The dress has a broken blind zipper. Instead of serging the seams I choose to turn the edges of the seams and stitching it. 

When you’re sewing something, things might go wrong. When it happens during the sewing proces, I don’t like it, but I can live with it and often  learn from the mistakes I make. But really, when you just have finished your dress, you don’t won’t things get broken. Please tell me, what was your sewing disaster? What made you get so frustrated that you would like to throw your project away?

 


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Yesterday for Mother’s Day, my sweetie pie husband gave me the day off. He cooked all of our meals and cleaned up too, and I was free to get some good sewing time in. I made a dress for the baby in a cute little retro print synthetic knit I found thrifting for a quarter.

For the second time now, I sewed an entire garment “in the flat.” Does anyone else do this? What the heck do I mean? Well, the instructions for the pattern I used, Butterick 5976, would have you sew the side, back and shoulder seams, then attach the collar and facing, insert the zipper next, and then ease in the sleeves and hem them (those tiny little sleeves!) before hemming the dress bottom.

Here is what I did:

  1. Serged the shoulder seams together and pressed them backward
  2. Eased in the sleeve cap and serged into place
  3. Serged sleeve hem and hemmed/stitched the opening of the sleeve while flat
  4. Sewed the collar as usual. Serged bottom of facing and attached facing and collar to dress
  5. Understitched facing and instead of tacking stitched facing to shoulder it in the ditch through the top of the shoulder seam
  6. Serged both sides of back seam separately then sewed to zipper bottom position. Inserted zipper, and hand slip-stitched facing edge at top of zipper
  7. Serged side seams and sleeve seams all at once. Pressed seams toward back. Alternately (to allow for small adjustments later) you could serge front and back individually and sew
  8. Serged hem and hemmed it

I don’t know if there is any reason not to sew this way, but I have been finding many aspects of construction easier when garments are sewn in the flat- especially kids stuff. Um, and zippers! If you are machine sewing a zipper, it is way, way easier to sew it flat without all of that extra fabric in the way. And why fuss to fold and hem a tiny sleeve when you can just sew it flat? Yes, this does make a seam that ends at the armscye, but isn’t that seam hidden by the child’s arm anyway?

 I’d really be interested to know if anyone else sews this way or has tried it, or if anyone knows of reasons why it might be a bad idea.

Another neat part about this project, for me, was that it was constructed mostly on my serger, which I have used a lot for finishing, but not construction. I imagine this method of sewing flat made the serger construction easier, as there were curves to sew but not circles.

 Now that I’ve rambled on, here are some pics of my little munchkin in her new dress.

 

Courtesy of the Vintage Pattern Wiki


 

She is wearing my shoes :)

 

It is great how she is so excited to wear a dress I have made her. Sometimes she comes to me with a shirt or scarf and says, “Mommy, I made this for you!” It won’t be long before we’ll have a little sweatshop going!

Also posted at my blog, Farmhouse Garden.

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