1940s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

1940s Organic Cotton Gingham Dress

By on October 12, 2017

5955 McCall sewing pattern, 1946

After watching the brilliant documentary The True Cost, about the human and environmental impact of fast fashion, I decided to try and make a completely ethically-produced dress. I chose to make it using an original sewing pattern from 1946 that I had won in a competition on the Vintage Sewing Pattern Nerds Facebook group. It’s a little later than my usual style dress (1930s to early 40s) but, as it looked like it could easily be from the late 1930s, I decided to go for it.

1940s organic gingham dress

The fabric I used was 100% organic cotton gingham from the Organic Textile Company. They produce this beautiful soft cotton in two different sizes and both in three different colours, red, blue and black. As I loved both sizes so much I chose to use both in red and use the smaller one on the bias. Of course, each of the pieces I cut in this way had to be stabilised with straight cut facings.

1940s organic gingham cotton dress

All of the trimmings I used were either vintage pieces or items I already owned, even the ivory cotton thread I used to sew the dress up. This all adds up to an almost totally ethically made garment. However, there is one thing I did have to buy new, and it wasn’t organic or ethically-produced, so I can’t quite say this dress is 100% ethical.

Head on over to my blog to find out what this item was and, if you want to know more about why it isn’t ethical, have a read of the comments at the end of the post.

Continue Reading

1940s | Blouses | Modern Patterns | Vintage Sewing

Gertie Keyhole Blouse, New Book for Better Sewing

By on September 26, 2017
Gertie Keyhole Blouse, Vintage on Tap | Vintageontap.com

Hello, everyone!

Long time since I’ve shared a project on here, but I haven’t been sewing too much lately 😣

Anyway, the last thing I worked on was the Gertie Keyhole blouse from the New Book for Better Sewing.

Gertie Keyhole Blouse, Vintage on Tap | Vintageontap.com

The pattern itself requires some pattern drafting!

It was a transformation from the Bow Tie blouse from the same book.

Essentially, you have to move the bust dart to the shoulder, and gather the shoulder for a cute rusching detail.

 

Gertie Keyhole Blouse, Vintage on Tap | Vintageontap.com

Five rows of gathers, and a keyhole cut out from the neckline- super 40s!

 

Gertie Keyhole Blouse, Vintage on Tap | Vintageontap.com

Absolutely LOVE how it came out– I’ve worn it at least once a week since I made it haha!

 

Anyway, more photos including a sewing tutorial (!!) over on my website.

All in all 10/10 in terms of how much I love it 😎

(Definitely recommend it for daily use! I wanna remake this in some yummy silks!)

Continue Reading

1940s | 1950s | Accessories | Burlesque / Pinup | Hats | Vintage Sewing

Vintage Headscarf + Free Pattern

By on March 26, 2017
Vintage Headscarf, free sewing pattern | Vintage on Tap

Its been a beat since I originally completed this project over on my blog, but it occurred to me that I never posted this project here, which is a shame since I know there are plenty of readers here who would be super interested!

Inspired by some old-school vintage traveling hoods and vintage headscarfs, I had to make my own from a vintage 1940s pattern, ASAP!

Vintage Headscarf, free sewing pattern | Vintage on Tap

My leopard print headscarf has already seen a bunch of wear since I made it- and all in all, it stitched up about an hour, start to finish. Perfect for protecting your pincurl sets and generally protecting you from the wind and humidity.

Vintage Headscarf, free sewing pattern | Vintage on Tap

I actually am super surprised at how much I love this headscarf- it was such a simple project but it feels super Old Hollywood Glam haha!

Vintage Headscarf, free sewing pattern | Vintage on Tap

I made the drafting instructions available over on my blog if you were interested in making this yourself. Since the pattern is from the 1940s, I figured it would be a good idea to just draw the pieces out (total of 4 pieces, if you’re making a lined version)- and put them online. I also went ahead and did a short video, showing you step by step how to make the hood as well, over on my YouTube channel.

Click to Get the Instructions!

Click to Watch the YouTube video!

I’m actually already planning on sewing this up in a white lawn for the summer time. Its also a good reminder to pick up some fabulous glam sunglasses to rock with it 🙂

Continue Reading

1940s | Dresses

A 40s wool dress with sunray-darts

By on February 24, 2017

While spring is already knocking at the door, I had the idea to sew a wintery wool dress. This pattern is included in a booklet with fabric-saving-pattens from 1944. It features a very slim skirt, slightly puffed sleeves and sunray darts around the neck.

I used a pure wool fabric in dark green for the dress and a black wool fabric for the contrasting belt and  bow. Unfortunately I was a bit over-ambitious and sized the pattern down too much, now it fits a little tight and has sleeves that are a little on the short side. But I do love it and am very happy with the result.

Here is a the original pattern drawing:

More photos and details I included on my blog parvasedapta.ch

Greetings from Switzerland,

ette

Continue Reading

Vintage Sewing

Unprinted Precut Vintage Sewing Patterns

By on January 15, 2017

My least favorite thing about sewing is cutting out pattern pieces.

Whether it means wrangling enormous sheets of tissue to find the pieces I need or taping and cutting printer paper from PDFs, it’s just a slog for me. (Pssst, speaking of PDFs, we’re putting PDFs up in shop this month if you want to sneak a peek – official announcement to follow once we’re finished.) 

Actually as I was typing this I had a flashback to the last time I tried to turn a spaghetti strap right side out- considering there were bellows of rage and several unladylike gestures thrown to the heavens, cutting out pattern pieces might have to be second least favorite. But anyway, cutting out pieces = zero fun in this house.

So I’m all about unprinted vintage patterns, like this Simplicity pattern from the 1930s. 

I love that they can come straight out of the envelope and onto the fabric, but the marking system of various punched holes can take some adjusting to.

If you haven’t had a chance to sew with many genuine vintage patterns yet, staring down at a big blank piece of tissue can be unnerving, so here’s something you may not know: there was a brief period of time in the early 1940s when Simplicity (and just Simplicity I think…I’ve never seen another brand do this) released patterns that were both precut and printed, like this:

Best of both worlds, right? Well, maybe, maybe not.

The argument for printing patterns instead of precutting them was that printing is more accurate than punching pieces from a giant stack of tissue paper which might shift around as the cut was made. If you’ve ever accidentally sewn something using the wrong seam allowance, you’ve already seen how a tiny deviation can have big results on a finished garment.

If you want to try one of these pre-cut printed patterns, you need to be looking for Simplicity patterns from the early 1940s like these:

Not confident in your pattern envelope dating skills? Here’s a tip – look at the hair styles. If you spend a little time with a cup of coffee scrolling through pinterest (torture, right?) you’ll start to get a feel for the haircuts associated with each period.

You’ll also see on the logo in teeny tiny text it says ‘cut to exact size’ above ‘printed pattern’, like this:

[insert record scratch noise here]

About a week after I confidently asserted that only Simplicity did this, I found another one…this time a 1956 Vogue Pattern. Here it is:

You can see at the bottom of the front of the envelope and on the back flap ‘Vogue’s new printed and perforated patterns’.

Here’s a pattern piece, showing the seam line printed on and notches and perforations precut.

Continue Reading

1940s | 1950s

1940s honky tonk shirt

By on November 29, 2016

Hello fellow seamstresses !!
I post here to show you my first 40s-50s western project : a honky tonk shirt !
I don’t know if some of you like this style, but personaly I am completely crazy about it !

img_7164-3

Trying to get some class like those country singers had

(such as the great Charline Arthur in the picture below)

charline-arthur

 

I used a recent pattern, not vintage, but inspired by this era. (The magazine is the french BURDA , july 2010).

I changed it a bit : I drafted “pistol” western cuff instead of the straight ones proposed, and removed a part of the front, to keep just one piece of yoke. And I hand embroided it, yes ma’am I took patiently the time to do it ! haha

I used burgundy gabardine, and beige plain cotton (I won’t again, I don’t know why I did it, I forgot my previous mistakes : wrinkles, everywhere, only on he beige parts, always …)

And yes, I am planning on making the pants matching the shirt, of course 🙂

 

img_7258

 

Here is a front view of the shirt.

img_7188

It is not perfect but I am really happy with it and wear it a lot ! I can’t wait to make me others !

Oh ! By the way, I need your precious help : if some of you know a website where I could buy  good quality light rayon gabardine (any colour, plain would be better) it would be so great ! (And I know many of you here are some serious fabric experts 😉 )

Thanks for reading !

Here’s he link to th post on my blog : https://wildchildsophie.wordpress.com/

Continue Reading

1940s | 1950s | 1970s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

A pattern mash up, 50 plus 70s equals 40s

By on November 20, 2016

advance-6190-complete-bodice-necklinedetail

Perhaps the pièce de résistance that a woman might have in the 50s, that rather special pattern in the stash of work and household clothes. Advance 6190 was a delight to work with! And I am so pleased with the results.

advance-6190-pattern

I was very short on fabric for this project, but the fabric, a wool blend crepe, given to me by a friend, was perfect, so perfect, I had to use it, so I teamed the 50s bodice up with a simple skirt from a 70s pattern, and voila!

advance-6190-tall

I now have a very 40s looking dress, win!

advance-6190-complete-talljpg

I have more photos and making details over on my blog.

I hope your sewing projects are going well as we approach the end of the year.

Happy sewing, Angela x

Continue Reading