1930s

Hi, this is me wearing a 1930's style blouse. If anybody watched the last 'Great British Sewing Bee' programme you may recognise this? I don't have the book but found the pattern (for free) online :-/ Anyyywayyyy, with no instructions I had to fumble my way through. I'm happy with my result. What do you think?

A close up of the front collar. On my first attempt there was a gap between the collar but because of the shirring underneath it sort of puckered and didn’t look good. So, I undid it :-( and redid it. But I’m happy I did as it looks much neater.
I used bias strips and hand stitched them onto the wrong side to finish the sleeve edges. I made rouleux strips to used to fasten the buttons.
This is a picture of the back opening with collar and button and loop.
I made my own bias strips to hem the blouse and inserted an invisable zip to the placket.

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Another 1930s re-pro pattern from EvaDress, I made these up a few months ago but finally got around to documenting them. I had started the blouse (not enough of the lovely rayon for a whole dress) ages ago, but the sleeve pleats got the better of me and then I got busy with other things. Once I’d figured them out though, I’m in love with the look.

EvaDress 1934 Frock

As I had an occasion to wear it, I finished the blouse and made up the lower portion of the pattern in a similar green coloured mystery fabric I picked up second hand.

EvaDress 1934 Frock (as separates) by HLB

EvaDress 1934 Frock (as separates) by HLB. Back view.

Cutting out the blouse and getting it to do what i wanted was a bit of a challenge. It’s a buttery rayon with lovely drape but frays terribly at the edges and slinks around when you try to sew it. I pinned it to within an inch of its life and took the time to hand baste as well as hand hem the bottom edge/ties, collar and ┬ásleeve edges. Time consuming but a nice neat finish.

Sleeve detail. Self covered button and pleating.

Most people thought it was a dress when worn together, but I actually like that I can mix and match it. For another event I made a shorter black rayon skirt with side godets for dancing in.

EvaDress 1934 Frock (blouse) with self drafted skirt by HLB

I’ll definitely be making this up again with some strategic alterations. As always, do check out the full post on the blog.

~Heather

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Hello all,

The usual – long time lurker etc. I’ve been sewing for at least two thirds of my life and am a part-time seamstress for hire. I also work in the theatre industry as a Stage Manager and Props builder. I’ve recently been making things from my vintage pattern stock, some of which are posted on my blog, and others which will be soon!

I thought for my first post, I’d share a project that I completed in the fall for a good friend’s wedding. Since I’ve been on contract for the past few months, I’ve just recently been able to add it to my site. I’ve been getting into 1930s styles, and the bride is a long time fan of the era, so it was a perfect fit that we design her dress accordingly. As a prelude, I don’t normally do wedding dresses. I feel that there is a large pool out there and I’m only interested if it’s a special, personalized gown. My previous versions have included a light green dress, and a Sleepy Hollow themed wedding party.

I did lots of research on 30s gowns, and working with fabric on the bias. Here’s the finished gown on the bride – in the end, I could not get it onto my dress form as there were no fastenings. The bodice is entirely cut on the bias and fits her like a glove (a glove that fits obviously…).

Late afternoon light on a lovely lady.

Action shot.

Princess seams, a beaming Groom and a fairy flower girl.

The pattern was self drafted. Pearl beads accent the front and back neckline.

Bodice beading and a custom veil too!

A train was attached with pearl beads also, which was removed for the reception (for dancing and sitting comfortably).

The back View without the train.

For more pics and nerdy sewing details, see the full post here.

More fun projects to come!

~ Heather

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30s coat pocket

I made our little niece a vintage tweed coat using a 1930s Pictorial Review pattern:

Pictorial Review 6128

Pictorial Review 6128

In true 1930s spirit, all the materials were re-purposed or came from my stash. We had some purple Woolrich tweed and black lining, and I cut the pocket flaps from an old pair of leather gloves. The buttons are vintage Civil Defence buttons from wartime Britain.

This was an experiment in both coat-making and tailoring for me. The pattern instructions said to pad stitch only the undercollar, and because the coat is a size 1 there could only be so much hand sewing. I love working with wool and heavy fabrics, so the project was a lot of fun, especially the pockets and lapels.

Here are some photos of the finished coat:

1930s child's coat front

1930s child's coat - front view

1930s child's coat - back view

1930s child's coat - back view

Here’s a closeup of the front buttons. I also tried out some handworked keyhole buttonholes:

Civil Defence buttons

Civil Defence buttons

For more details and tailoring progress pics see my blog post.

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