Western Jeans (Butterick 5895 meets Advance 8341, c. 1957)

I’m a little bit obsessed with Butterick 5895 (Gertie’s pants) now that I’ve gotten the fit perfected – so I thought I’d try making a pair of western jeans (ranch pants) from the same pattern.

The inspiration was this pattern – Advance 8341, View 1 – Frontier Pants.

pants

I guessed what the pockets should look like from a pair of Freddies Jeans, and added them to the Butterick version (and lengthened the legs).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pockets turned out better than I hoped for! I’m specially proud of the button holes – my machine is 1950’s and it’s pretty hard to do a nice button hole.

The fabric is stretch denim, but it’s not super stretchy as it holds it’s shape really well.

There’s nothing I would change about these jeans – not one thing!

If you’re interested, I did a quick tutorial on my blog showing how to adjust your pants pattern to allow for a bigger booty or belly (and what the Butterick pattern looks like unmodified for curves).

Share the curvy love!

XXX

Hollywood Belted Blouse

On a recent trek to the antique store, I found a cache of vintage patterns! One of them was this lovely belted blouse from a 1940s Hollywood Pattern. It is such a lovely style, and the pattern is a cinch to make!

I made the yoke, collar, pocket contrast and belt out of a contrasting fabric. I lined the pocket so as to not have seams visible inside.

The pattern features a yoke that is topstitched onto the front and back bodice. I just love that way of sewing seams!

As cute as this style is, it just does not look very good on me. I’ve never been able to wear belted-blouse styles, and this unfortunately is no exception!

 The good part is, it looks beautiful on my mom! I’m happy to get to see my work on someone else, so I don’t really mind. :)

Have you ever made a belted blouse?

For more photos and details, hop over to my blog! Thank you!

1940s Summer Frock

Summer 1940s Dress 2

 

It’s great to be back on We Sew Retro again! I haven’t posted on here in months.

I have fallen deeply in love with 1940s styles, and have been sewing up bunches of them! I made this dress last week, and I just love it. The fabric is lightweight and just perfect for summer!! I used Butterick 5846 (a modern pattern that’s renowned for its vintage flair), and replaced the flared skirt with a gathered style.

 

Summer 1940s Dress 10

 

Hop over to my blog for more details!

Summer Sewing

Hey guys, lately I’ve been enjoying the warm weather and have put away my winter patterns for a few months. Yesterday I began this bra top, and today I finished it! It was super easy and quick, not to mention really cute. Where do you all wear your retro bra tops? I think they’re really neat, but not as practical as a full shirt. I really liked the small amount of fabric it required- about 1 yard and 1/2 yard of lining. I used all scraps for it!

DSCF7237 DSCF7238 DSCF7244 Circa 1940s Simplicity Pattern 2825 Junior Misses and Misses Jacket Bra and Shorts Size 14

The finished product looks a little different from the drawing. The folded edge is small so it lays flat rather than sticking out a little. I am not sure how to fix that.

The shorts I made last summer out of this pattern:

1960s McCall's Pattern

Top: Simplicity 2825

Year: 1949

Cost: <$5

Shorts: Simplicity 4009

Year: 1962

Cost: $5

Thanks for looking!

 

Everyone loves a Bad Girl (Butterick 5895)

I feel really late to the party sewing up Gertie’s Butterick 5895 - better late than never though!

I’d wanted a pair of 1950s fitted pants for ages, but wasnt sure a bigger gal like me could pull them off – I was so wrong!

With a few mods (full list on my blog) to make adjustments for a big booty and large calves, they fit perfectly.

I used a stretch cotton chino (had it for 10 years in my stash) and would recommend using a heavier weight stretch cotton so it won’t hug your bumps and lumps.

Verdict – perfection! I need these in ankle length, in demin, and in novelty prints! I can also see these pants being the basis for little shorts, and maybe even a playsuit.

Bigger girls – definitely add these to your sewing list! xxx

Modern Home Needlecraft

I was fortunate to be gifted this book by a friend. I have spent the last couple of weeks pouring over the pages. There are some amazing techniques, pattern drafting directions and suggestions for make do and mend.

The book was published in 1946 and came in its original card envelope, with the address still intact. it even had the slip inside that stated it must be paid for by return, so maybe it was from some book club. It was published by Odhams Press in London, which I’d never heard of.

Inside the book I found two patterns, one for a child’s dress – it’s not a printed pattern, but looks to be in very good condition. There is also a knitting pattern for a boy’s slipover. I don’t knit so cant ever imaging making this.

The book contains a wealth of information and there are a range of techniques covered. Have you ever heard of a Jetted pocket?

There are pattern drafting instructions for a range of simple garments including suspender belts and underwear; mens shirts and pj’s; childrens shirts and trousers.

And to top it all off, suggestions to make do and mend. How to make your garments last longer or refashion them. I particularly like the section on disguising underarm shabbiness!

This is an absolute treasure and I look forward to trying some of the techniques and patterns for myself.

Have you ever come across such a gem?