Vintage Style 1940s Blouse

vintage-blouse-left-side

I’m excited to be contributing my very first project to We Sew Retro!  This top went together surprisingly fast (er ah, it was preempted with M6993 and other sewing projects).  There are sure to be more of these babies coming from me and Tabitha (my 1925 hand crank sewing machine) in the months ahead.

The pattern calls for six 1/2″ buttons; to my stash I went.  Lookie what I found!

 

vintage-buttons

Since I’ve been sewing vintage style garments I have come to love the double dart feature many of the patterns feature. As I whittle down my waist (ahem) I am sure they will be even more gorgeous.

spring-for-cotton-double-darts

The fact that my stash had five matching buttons did not stop me from using this one wonky button.  From where I stand it simply adds to the uniqueness of my vintage-style blouse.  Oh how eccentric of me don’t you think?

Simplicity 1692 Left Shoulder

Simplicity 1692 Shoulder Shot

The really cool thing I like about this blouse is that I made it from a repurposed cotton table cloth.  Not sure if it was vintage or not, but I like the feel of it.  There is also a subtle pattern in the weave that does not show up in my photographs.

vintage-top-side-front-view

This vintage style blouse is a definite re-do.  It was quick to make as well as fun.  There is no end to the vintage style embellishments that may be used for this retro Simplicity 1692, View D, beauty.  For inquiring minds and those who did not have a chance to visit my blog here are my project stats:

Project Stats:

  • Fabric – Vintage cotton table cloth (less than $2.00)
  • Thread – 40% off sale at Jo-Ann Fabrics
  • Invisible zipper – Repurposed
  • Vintage Cotton Rick Rack – pert near free
  • Vintage buttons – pert near free
  • Difficulty:  Intermediate

Cheers,

 

lyric-siggie-purple-cute

Housedress with Pockets

Long-time reader, first-time poster. This housedress is based on “The Magic Nightgown” at http://sewingvintage.blogspot.ca/2012/08/the-magic-nightgown.html, but in a cotton print, knee-length for a more 1940s look, and with patch pockets added. I made bias tape from the leftover fabric rather than using contrasting tape to finish the sleeves and neck opening. Also, I only did two darts. I think next time I make up this pattern, I’ll follow the “small” measurements for the neck opening, shoulder breadth and armholes, as the latter are slightly larger than I could have wished, but overall, I’m pleased with the look and the comfort of this casual dress. purple_dress

Vintage Simplicity 4687

simplicity 4687 vintage dress

It’s amazing how quickly I can rustle up a dress when I need to. Just a question of the right pattern, the right fabric and no serious fitting issues.

I’m not sure if this pattern is 50s or 60s but its a pretty simple shift dress all the same and works just as well 50-60 years on.

simplicity 4687 sewing pattern

Rather a lot of ease was a good thing as far as waist and hip was concerned but I did have to take a bit of bagginess out of the bust. Next time round, with a bit more time on hands, I’ll grade it properly.

simplicity 4687 vintage dress

It’s not lined but then the fabric is a great mid-weight cotton with a bit of stretch so there’s no need. The neck and armscyes are faced and I made sure to understitch so the facing lies super flat. I overlocked the seams which isn’t very authentic, I know, but I did hand-stitch a 2 1/4 inch hem.

Feels so good to wear a dress out in the evening of the day that you made it!

More about that over at ooobop

1930’s Inspired Scarf Looks

I just can’t seem to get enough of scarves, whether vintage or modern.  So I came up with a few ideas to share!  Changing the pattern or material will help create a different look will still maintaining that feminine, sophisticated feel.  Visit my blog for the step by step visuals!

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Best Wishes,

Aimee

1940s Wide Leg Trousers (EvaDress/Simplicity 3322)

2015 seems to be the the Year of the Pants for me – no more procastinating.

On the way  to sewing my dream project – perfect vintage jeans – I finally made the EvaDress Wide Leg Trousers (3322), a repro of Simplicity 3322 c.1940. The fabric is navy gaberdine.

eva1evadress

I haven’t made an EvaDress pattern before, so I wasn’t sure what to expect with fit etc. I did have to make four muslins to get the fit right though – it may have been due to the pattern grading to a large size (I made size 40). Thankfully pants are normally pretty quick to sew up.

The main changes I made were to use a back zipper instead of side buttons, and to lengthen the crotch depth by about 3/4 inch.

eva4

I’ve already made another pair up in cranberry gaberdine, and have a chocolate pair waiting in the wings too.

Even better, they go perfectly with a Smooth Sailing Blouse that I made a while back (isn’t orange and navy a great combination?). I think this may be the 15th time I’ve made this pattern up, it’s such a great staple.

eva5

As always, there’s more on my blog!

A cloche

When I made a hat to go with my 1950’s suit, I got interested in making other styles of hats as well.

Hats can be tricky for me. Not all styles work with long hair and a fringe. But I really liked the idea of making a 1920’s style cloche and fortunately, I had some patterns in my 1920’s Gracieuse magazines.

10This is the design I picked but I didn’t add the scarf.

patroonThe pattern looks like this. Different from any more modern cloche pattern I’ve ever seen.

clocheI made my hat from a material that is definitely not period accurate: thick synthetic felt. I cut the pieces without seam allowance and sewed them edge to edge by hand.

cloche2I think it’s a fun hat and it will count towards my Vintage Sewing Pattern Pledge. I’m not so sure it looks like something from the 1920’s though ;)