60(s) squares

Some time ago I made the Simplicity 1609 repro pattern for a gift and I liked it enough to give it a try as a nice, breezy summer dress (yay for sewing warm weather garments in mid-December…). I had some vintage, but still fresh and luminous white cotton sateen in a period-perfect abstract/square print.

 

1_s

I made only minor adjustments, including a suble lengthening of the dress and interfacing its hem to make the A-line shape more pronounced.

To keep things simple, I didn’t line it, as it’s supposed to be a way out of my constant summer dilemma, “how not to expose too much skin but be able to stay cool in a sizzling city”. I think this pattern was made for cheerful, light dresses; it’s so simple and unfussy.

 

2_s

I hope you like this little project of mine. To read more, visit my blog, rvdzik.blospot.com. Have a wonderful day! 🙂

· A Christmas Pixie! ·

gretelchristmasdress-6

Merry Christmas to all of you! I’m sharing some photos today of my sister wearing a “vintage Hallmark Christmas card”- inspired dress that my mom made for her a couple years ago, and thought you all might appreciate the festive vintage look! 🙂 Swing on by my blog- Mode de Lis– for more photos!

gretelchristmasdress-20

Gretel made all the faux fur accessories- detachable collar and cuffs, muff, and pixie hat! I’m hoping that if I ask very nicely she might let me wear it on Christmas…. 😉

gretelchristmasdress-23

The Little Red Dress Project, Butterick 5603

The holidays are now in full swing and I knew I had to hurry and stitch up my holiday dress! Fortunately I was able to fall into the “Little Red Dress Project” guidelines with my 1956 Butterick 5603!

Butterick 5603 | Vintage on Tap

Butterick 5603 | Vintage on Tap

Butterick 5603 | Vintage on Tap

Butterick 5603 | Vintage on Tap

 

I used silk dupioni, silk charmeuse to underline the whole thing, and silk organza to stabilize it. Surprisingly, for a dress with so much hand sewing, it didn’t take more than a few days to complete. The fit itself also wasn’t too difficult, though I did need to change the bust darts into pleats to be able to handle a full bust adjustment of 2″. From the waist, I cut about 5-6 inches to accommodate a small waist length as well.

To see more photos and read more about my specific tips sewing this dress, please check out my blog.
To watch the whole start-to-finish making of video, head on over to YouTube! 

By Hand London – Kim Dress – The Pinup-Perfect Party Dress!

Hi pinups! To round up this year’s sewing pattern reviews, I thought I’d end on a festive note with my By Hand London ‘Kim’ Dress! The perfect dress for pinup-perfect party style this Christmas.

byhandlondonkimdress1

Sewing Summary:

Pattern: By Hand London Kim Dress

Fabric: Plain Cotton Poplin Fabric – Scarlet Red

Notions: 22″ concealed zip

Sewing time: Half a day.

Modifications: None.

Fit: I know I’m going to love the fit of this dress even more with a full bust adjustment.

Difficulty: Medium.

Watch out for: Getting even gathers and under-stitching the lining of the bodice.

Make Again?: Yes! I see this pattern being my go to Summer dress pattern once I made the bust adjustments. Simple, pretty quick and a gorgeous result!

byhandlondonkimdress5

For my full review & images, check out my blog The Crafty Pinup.

Thank you!
xo

1930s Bishop Sleeve Blouse & Pocket Detail Skirt

1930s blouse and skirt

Do you ever have an idea in your mind that never really pans out when it comes to your sewing? Yep, that’s exactly what happened here. Both the blouse and skirt were going to be very different to how they actually turned out, mainly due to not having quite enough fabric for either of them!

The white silk with navy polka dots is actually a vintage fabric I picked up at a flea market. It was very narrow and as a result, the originally planned pattern of McCalls – 7053, from their Archive Collection, just didn’t fit. So after abandoning this idea, I decided to use the top half of this beautiful original 1930s dress pattern instead. It’s been sat in my collection for a while totally unused, but boy am I glad I used it this time.

Vintage 1930s Buttons

It worked out beautifully in this fabric, despite having to redo the front yoke many, many times. The issue was that it needed to be lined to give it some stability and the join at the bottom, where the button placket areas overlap, was incredibly fiddly. After many attempts, both on the machine and by hand, I finally got it to sit right. However, after all that stress I gave up on trying to do buttonholes, so just sewed the buttons in place.

1930s sleeve detail

Instead of finishing the sleeves with a mid-forearm cuff as shown in the pattern, I decided to add a long cuff right down to the wrist. I absolutely love this style of bishop sleeve, it’s so classically 1930s, and of course keeps your forearms warm! I finished it off with four buttons and rouleau loops to allow enough room to get my hand in and out.

The fabric itself, unfortunately, has weakened during the pre-wash and making up stages. As a result, I’ve decided to only wear it on special occasions and to try and find another white and navy polka dot fabric for a more wearable version. I think it would work well in a crepe or a soft cotton lawn.

1930s blouse yoke detail

The skirt was drafted from another original 1930s pattern, which I’ve used multiple times as it’s such a simple design so can be changed to just about any style. The fabric is a deep mustard linen, which I bought from My Fabrics and a dream to work with. It’s quite a heavy weight linen so can be used for both summer and winter.

The design itself was taken from an original 1930s skirt I own but haven’t yet worn. I love the little pockets on it, so decided to replicate them here with a slightly different style button tab. They worked out quite well I think and give such a lovely interest to the front of the skirt, along with the deep single kick pleat on the centre front.

If you want to read more about it, and see the gorgeous original 1930s navy suede shoes I wore with it, just pop on over to my blog.

Grey dress from a 1960s Burda pattern

In summer I stumbled upon a beautiful and simple pattern for a dress in a 1962 wedding edition of Burda and immediatelly made a few versions of it, including one for a client who loved it as much as I did.

img_9671 img_9679

The pattern proved very versatile and looks great with a variety of fabrics –no wonder, because it’s just such a simple and staple piece. I really love the short sleeves, they add elegance to an otherwise simple design. I made it with different skirts. I usually freehand them, pinning tucks as I go but I also made one version with a circle skirt that I need to photograph.

img_9759 img_9674

This is one of my iterations of the pattern: I added a collar with a bow to it. For a moment there I was afraid it looked too much like a hotel personnel outfit! But I guess the bow helps distract the mind from this easy association ;). It’s fully interlined but with no lining. I’m having second thoughts about interlining this one… turned out quite stiff, even though the outer fabric was quite thin. I finished the skirt with a blind hem stich by hand.

Check out the original blog post for more photos.