A ‘Round the House Wrap Dress

Simplicity 2275, dated 1948 | Lavender & Twill
Stitching challenge 2015 for a vintage wardrobe | Lavender & Twill
Vintage - around the house - mama style | Lavender & Twill
Hunter green vintage 1940s reproduction heels | Lavender & Twill
Easy 1940s style | Lavender & Twill
Pin curls, vintage, and 1940s frocks | Lavender & Twill
*whew*

Am I ever so glad that this dress is done! I have never had so much trouble putting together a sewing project before ~ not because it didn’t come together easily enough, that wasn’t the problem ~ it was because I just couldn’t get the dang thing to sit right! (┛◉Д◉)┛*rage*

I suppose this is where experienced seamstresses look pointedly at their muslins and toiles, then at me, then back at the neat little muslin sitting on the dress form…..

Yah.  Ain’t nobody got time for that! Least ways, I don’t.

I found out that the bodice of my 90% completed dress was not fitting correctly because of my nursing bust size, even though I’d measured the pattern and thought that it would fit. The design of the back of the neck was not working for me either. It wouldn’t sit right no matter how I adjusted it ~ up or down!

Getting the dress to fit required a lot of what my coding Mister calls “hacking”. In my sewing world however, hacking involves taking a sharp pair of scissors to already sewn seams and hacking the bajeebies out of the fabric along strategically drawn chalk lines.

I cut roughly two inches out from the back of the neck, and lopped off three to seven inches from the sleeves, then hemmed the skirt up by five inches. It was a risk that the whole thing would fall apart if I snipped too much, or in the wrong place, but it paid off as the dress sits much better around the neckline now.
It isn’t all weird and bunchy like it was before. I don’t quite know what was happening, but the back of the dress sat really high up on the back of my neck, and it was making the darts sit in the wrong place, which was making the bodice puff up really strangely above the bust.

Of course, getting it to work took a lot of extra fiddling, which took a lot of extra time, and I ended up taking way too long on this project. Plus, I’ve been sick as a dog for the last week, which means May is officially up and I didn’t manage to get my other project ~ a winter blouse ~ done this month.  (TT ^ TT)

So, only one more project ticked off the great Sewing All the Things challenge of 2015, but at least it actually happened because I was worried there for a moment that I would end up having to toss the whole dress.

The source of much trouble! ~


Next question ~ does anyone want to purchase this pattern?  It will come with all the original pieces of the pattern, the original instructions {taped, because they are falling apart}, the original envelope, and also a copy of the bodice, sleeve, facings, waist inserts, tie, and pocket pattern pieces all traced onto Polytrace {similar to Swedish Tracing Paper ~ it’s a soft, woven fabric-like paper}. Basically, I traced off everything but the skirt, so you can work straight from the pattern copy.

If you would like to buy the pattern, along with the the Polytrace copies for $20.00 AUD, please email me with your Paypal address and mailing address, and I can send off an invoice which will also include whatever the P+P will cost.

~ Project Details ~

  • Year: 1948
  • Pattern: Simplicity 2275
  • Fabric: 2 1/2 metres of red and green sprig floral of poly-cotton{?}. I have no idea about the fibre content of this fabric as my Grandmother gave it to me.
  • Notions: None, is a wrap dress.
  • Time to complete: Three weeks
  • Make again? Nope. I really don’t want to make this dress again. It was just such a hassle to get it working properly that I really don’t want to go through all of that again. I like the dress, but not that much.
  • Wear again? I will, but I think it’ll probably be in my “around the house, running errands, going to playgroup, etc” wardrobe. Which is okay with me because I need more vintage around the house clothes anyway.
  • Total Cost:  $0.00 ~ yay for stash busting!

Have any of you had sewing dramas with almost-but-not-quite-failure projects before?  Would you seam rip to make it work, or try ‘hacking’ it up? Plus, how great are my new shoes ~ right?  (ノ ゜ω゜)ノ

xox,

bonita


༺ ♡ ༻


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Smooth Sailing Trousers – My First Pair of Pants!

After going through a phase of sewing nothing but knit dresses and T-shirts, I’m back with a very vintage-style garment! This is my first pair of pants, made from the Smooth Sailing Trousers pattern from Wearing History. Since I became interested in vintage styles, I’ve always loved 30’s/40’s style wide-leg trousers, and this pattern was exactly what I was looking for! It’s hard to see because the fabric is black, but there are pleats at the front, darts at the back, a side zipper, and optional cuffs, belt loop and belt. I made the version without cuffs, but with the belt loops. I skipped the belt, though, because I have a couple black belts already!

I cut a size 12 for the muslin and graded to a 14 at the hips, but ended up sizing up for a little more ease at the waist. I tweaked the fit a little though by keeping the darts, pleats and crotch curve from the size 12. I also shortened the pieces by 2″.

I used a bamboo rayon (not sure what to call it exactly) with nice drape, but it ended up being really shifty and stretchy on the bias after I washed it – it was originally very crisp and linen-like. It probably wasn’t ideal for these pants, because they’ve really stretched out and need re-hemming (possibly some other alterations too…).

The pattern is very simple to construct, perfect for someone new to making pants. The hardest part was working with the fabric! If they hadn’t stretched out so much, I would have been very happy with how they turned out. Right now, I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with them, but I’ve made anther pair and I can definitely say that I love the pattern and the style!

For more photos and construction details, check out my blog! I also wrote a detailed review of the pattern as a guest post on Sew Sweetness, if you want to know more about the pattern itself!

Oh, and I also made the blouse I’m wearing in these photos. It’s the Sewaholic Pendrell, made from a muumuu that I bought at a thrift store! Thanks for reading!

Simplicity 6220 (1965)

It’s wedding season! Guess who needs 5 million spring/summer cocktail dresses? (Hint: it’s me!)

simplicity 6220 | allie J. | alliemjackson.com

I made Simplicity 6220 in this pale aqua silk thinking it would be good for spring/summer with bare legs and wearable in winter with white or black tights. Three-season dressing!

simplicity 6220 | allie J. | alliemjackson.com

Here is a close up of the v-shaped princess seams. This was what drew me to the pattern.

simplicity 6220 | allie J. | alliemjackson.com

I posted more about the construction of this dress here and more photos of me wearing it here!

Thanks for reading!

xoxo,
Allie
alliemjackson.com

A Vintage Dress in Blackpool

Lucy-in-20th-Century-Cloth-2-1-copy

Hello, I want to share with you a 50s style dress that I made recently. It is with retro print fabric by 20th Century Cloth which I loved as it is 150cm wide … we all love a circle skirt! The pattern is an Eliza M one, which again I love – it fits well. I altered it ever so slightly but it was easy to do.

The dress was perfect for a stroll on the beach and then a trip to Blackpool Tower Ballroom. I felt just the part. I also wore my favourite Christian Dior vintage sunnies… ever hopeful of a sunny afternoon…

Lucy-in-20th-Century-Cloth-1-copy

Hope you like it. I recommend having a look at 20th Century Cloth for fabrics – they have some gorgeous prints for vintage dressmaking.

If you want to pop on to my blog’s project page and see anything else I have made then click here.

Loving all of your beautiful designs and makings. Thanks for reading!

Lucy x

Simplicity 1692 – Lovely Leopard

I’ve spent this past week working on Simplicity 1692. I decided to do View B, and I picked this lovely leopard print cotton that I purchased from a buy/sell/trade group I’m a part of. I had just the right amount for the blouse. As I have discussed in the past, my wardrobe is in desperate need of some separates so this is the first in an effort to remedy that situation.

If you follow me on Instagram, you may have already seen some of these. I’ve been posting my progress updates all week!

This was the progress after the first night. I had all the darts and tucks sewn, along with the bodice sides and shoulders stitched and serged.

After the second night, I had the back opening faced and the button and loop added. I also had the neckline bound and hand stitched down.

Night three saw the sleeves attached and bound. All that was left at this point was to add a zipper… (I would have done that sooner but I didn’t have one the right size and color) and add the decorative bows on the arms and neckline.

They were added this morning. The pattern calls for an invisible zipper and that requires an invisible zipper foot. I don’t have one of those and I’m terrible at inserting zippers by machine. So… I hand picked the invisible zipper! I’m so pleased with how it turned out. It’s completely invisible and I’m very proud of it. I promise I will work on zippers and learning to insert them by machine in the very near future… Maybe.

So here’s some pictures of the finished top. Modeled by my lovely purple headless assistant Millie.

I’m also very proud of the inside of this top. All my seams are completely serged and finished neatly. It’s as lovely inside as it is outside.

And finally some pictures of the top on me… Ignore my lack of makeup and my ‘hanging-out-around-the-house-with-the-kids’ hair. Please. The fit on this blouse is pretty good. It’s a bit snug in the arms, but that is normally a problem I have with both hand made and ready to wear tops. Guess I’m going to have to do a few more arm workouts each week.

All in all this was a great make and I’m pleased with how it turned out. This makes #VintagePledge make number four for me this year! I pledged five so I should have that knocked out soon. I’d love to double my pledge this year. Check out my blog over at www.shessewbettie.blogspot.com to keep up with what I’m sewing!

Thanks again for hanging out through this. I hope everyone has a wonderful Memorial Day weekend (here in the states) and remember the reason why we get to celebrate this weekend. #rememberthebrave

 

Vintage Style 1940s Blouse

vintage-blouse-left-side

I’m excited to be contributing my very first project to We Sew Retro!  This top went together surprisingly fast (er ah, it was preempted with M6993 and other sewing projects).  There are sure to be more of these babies coming from me and Tabitha (my 1925 hand crank sewing machine) in the months ahead.

The pattern calls for six 1/2″ buttons; to my stash I went.  Lookie what I found!

 

vintage-buttons

Since I’ve been sewing vintage style garments I have come to love the double dart feature many of the patterns feature. As I whittle down my waist (ahem) I am sure they will be even more gorgeous.

spring-for-cotton-double-darts

The fact that my stash had five matching buttons did not stop me from using this one wonky button.  From where I stand it simply adds to the uniqueness of my vintage-style blouse.  Oh how eccentric of me don’t you think?

Simplicity 1692 Left Shoulder

Simplicity 1692 Shoulder Shot

The really cool thing I like about this blouse is that I made it from a repurposed cotton table cloth.  Not sure if it was vintage or not, but I like the feel of it.  There is also a subtle pattern in the weave that does not show up in my photographs.

vintage-top-side-front-view

This vintage style blouse is a definite re-do.  It was quick to make as well as fun.  There is no end to the vintage style embellishments that may be used for this retro Simplicity 1692, View D, beauty.  For inquiring minds and those who did not have a chance to visit my blog here are my project stats:

Project Stats:

  • Fabric – Vintage cotton table cloth (less than $2.00)
  • Thread – 40% off sale at Jo-Ann Fabrics
  • Invisible zipper – Repurposed
  • Vintage Cotton Rick Rack – pert near free
  • Vintage buttons – pert near free
  • Difficulty:  Intermediate

Cheers,

 

lyric-siggie-purple-cute