SURPRISE! I’m back! Quick, right? Today I have a project that I consider more throw-back than vintage: Simplicity 5399 from 1981. Truthfully, I don’t think there’s been the same type of evolution in men’s fashion as there has in women’s. Most men’s patterns seem timeless to me. These shorts were my first foray with sewing a men’s garment. Aside from the obvious, sewing these wasn’t much different than sewing clothing for myself. This came as a surprise. A certain competitive design/sewing television program had led me to believe that menswear was somehow more difficult or challenging than women’s.  It’s not; with the exception of the client. ;-)

Both my husband and I are thrilled with his new shorts. Now that I’ve tested the water, I see more menswear in my sewing future! Do you sew men’s garments?

See you soon,

Michelle 

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Hello!

Long time, no see :)

In the past few weeks I’ve been incredibly busy with school but I managed to take a break from learning and squeezed this cute capripants in my schedule. The pattern I used is Gertie’s Butterick 5895 which doesn’t seem to be very popular. That I don’t really understand because the pattern is amazing! It leaves so many options to adjust the trousers to your liking.

For example, I made heart shaped pockets for the back and sewed a one-sided zip (I hope that’s what you call it in English :/ ) in the back. The waistband is a tad bit wider than the pattern suggests but that is okay (only about 1/2”) and in the end I wish I had made beltloops…well, next time!

I will make one more adjustments at the hems. I plan on tightening them around the knee area and sew slits on each side, so they’re more summery.

The top is Butterick 4685 which I shortened to waist-lenght.

Fabrics:

Pants: denim-stretch

Shirt: Cottonblend (used for blouses)

(whoops forgot to take out some basting stitches ;P )

Hope you like them :)

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My first pencil skirt (from Burda 2012-05) with a tiki blouse (from Burda 2009-09), a little 50′s way …
I didn’t know if I will wear it, but my lover’ve said to me : go !

Denim for the skirt and italian cotton for the blouse (2 years in my wardrobe to wait)

Have a nice day

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I’ve always loved the round retro cushion, but I just couldn’t justify the expense of buying one – cushions are serious investments these days! So, I decided to make one and show you guys just how easy it is to make your own as well!

You can find the full tutorial on my blog. The bulk of the cushion is hand-sewn, so it does take longer to make than your traditional square cushion cover, but the results are simply gorgeous (the centre grid on this cushion took me about 2-3 hours to hand sew one evening). It also gives you a chance to practice your hand sewing and it’s really quite forgiving if you’re a bit rusty.

While the cushion itself looks complicated, I’ve hopefully made the process much easier to understand and once you get the hang of it, it’s a little like knitting with it’s repetitive stitches which makes it great t.v sewing.

 

If you do give one of these a go, please let me know!! I’d love to see them.

xx

J

 

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Hi there everyone,
My friend at work is leaving for pastures new this week. I’m really sad she is leaving, she quite often keeps me sane! Because she is also a really creative person I wanted to make her a leaving present rather than buy something.
When I was about 5 years old my Nana bought me a cute little broderie anglaise apron. Nana wasa thrifty gal too and I’m certain she bought it at a jumble sale! I loved that little apron and wore it when we baked (well Nana baked, I just rolled a bit of pastry around until it turned black) and sometime just because I wanted to.
So inspiration hit! I will make my friend an apron so she can look vintage glam while pottering around the house.
I didn’t have a pattern so after a couple of hours soaking up vintage inspiration on Pinterest, I drafted my own.
And here are the results…
I think I will make more of these little aprons. They make great little vintage inspired gifts. You can see more pictures and info on my blog.
Hope you are having a great Monday folks.
Love, Eliza Brown x

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Hi!

First time poster- long time lurker- but I finally have something that I felt I needed to share!

 

This swimsuit was made from the Pin-Up Girls 2901 ‘Denise Swimsuit’ pattern, which is one of Beverly Johnson’s patterns. I have actually been lucky enough to take her master swimwear course!! It’s a 2 week course, all about making swimwear, and I just finished my first week of the course!

This is the second swimsuit I’ve made- and after my first, more plain suit, I knew I wanted to go with a vintage vibe for my second (who doesn’t secretly want to be a 50′s bombshell on the beach?).

So out came the flower print and in came the ruching!! This is a princess seamed suit- and I thought it would be perfect for that really retro look- so I added this ruched modesty panel to the center front.

A modesty panel is a piece that comes over the front and is supposed to hide the crotch area- it can go much lower almost like a skirt in the front. As you can see I’m not overly modest and mine stops at the top of the leg, haha, I added it more for the ruching.

What I love so much about this suit- beyond the fabric and the overall bombshell goddess feel- is that it’s really figure flattering, between the princess seams and the ruching over the tum- I’m laughing- well let’s just say that I’m confident enough wearing this that I can post a picture of myself on the internet in a swimsuit (eeek)!

But the really cool part about this swimsuit is the interior construction- this one has a ‘floating bra’ inside that is made with swim foam and regular channeling and underwire. If you don’t know much about Beverly Johnson aka ‘The Fairy Bra Mother’, her real forte is making custom bras and lingerie- so she has really incorporated that into her super supportive and flattering swimwear.

This really helps to give a much shapelier , 50′s hourglass look in a swimsuit!

After this course is over I can’t wait to go home and make swimsuits for all my super busty friends who refuse to go swimming with me because they can’t find swimsuits supportive enough to fit them!

I feel like I can take on any wave in this without any worries of a peek-a-boob incident- this suit isn’t going anywhere!

If you want to know more about this suit, swimsuit construction and this course, I am posting everyday of my course over on my blog!

Also I’m putting all my finished swimsuits up on PatternReview  if you want to know more about the Pin-Up Girl’s patterns!

Why can’t it be summer right now?

xo erin

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This dress was actually intended as a wearable muslin (after two non-wearable muslins) for a dress I’m making for my high school graduation, but I’m quite happy with how it turned out!

The pattern is Vogue S-4727 from 1956, which I borrowed from a friend who has the most amazing vintage pattern collection. I sized it down using a photocopier (you can see my post on that here), and I was surprised to find that it fit me perfectly with very minor alterations!

Since there’s lots in the pattern that I’d never done before (underarm gussets, godets, a zipper inserted into a godet, hemming such a full skirt), I wanted to make a wearable muslin. That way, I would have a better idea how it was put together when I make the real thing (in a gorgeous turquoise silk dupioni).

Here’s where I need your advice! I’m not happy at all with my zipper or my hem, and I need to figure out better ways to do both.

The zipper starts in the side seam, then curves into the godet, but where it curves, the lap puckers and flips forward! I think I would have the same problem with a centered zipper, so I’m considering an invisible one, but I don’t really trust invisible zippers after having many of them break (once before I even finished the dress). Help!

Also, this skirt is full because of the godets, but is as full as a circle skirt. Before now, I had never hemmed a circle skirt, and I’m not really happy with the hem on this. It looks fine in the photos because I had just ironed it, but after a while it doesn’t hang very nicely. I would like to do the hem by hand when I make my grad dress, but I don’t really know the best way to do it. I’m considering using horsehair braid, just for fun, but any suggestions would be appreciated!

For more pictures, and for more construction details (including my problems with the zipper and hem), see my blog post.

Also, if you’re interested in following my progress on my grad dress, I’ll be doing a series of posts on the construction at my blog, Adventures of a Young Seamstress. Thanks for reading!

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It’s been a while since we last spoke. Truth is, I haven’t been doing a lot of sewing. Who knew that moving house would be such a time consuming task? Not me. That’s for sure. After my routine is broken, I have a hard time getting myself back into rhythm, and the things I was in the habit of doing become difficult to find motivation to do. After a few months of slacking, I couldn’t handle any more daydreaming about sewing. I needed to start. I dug out the most basic project I could think to sew. Simplicity 9267 from 1971 is a basic skirt pattern with timeless, classic design.

I used our extended winter as an opportunity to play with my favorite textile, wool. A skirt pattern like Simplicity 9267 is a fantastic canvas for improvisation. I wanted my skirt to be a basic wardrobe piece with a little bit of interest. I added faux leather trim to the pattern pieces using a zig-zag stitch and created a chevron design over the hips.  I wrote a bit more explanation and posted some additional photos on my blog.
This project was exactly what I needed to get back into the swing of things. I’m thrilled to be sewing again and setting my sights on spring. I’ll see you again soon!

XOXO,

Michelle

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I finally have a finished dress to share! It’s vintage Simplicity 7705, the knockoff of the famous DVF wrap. I’m super pleased with how it turned out and now want lots of knits to make more. It makes me feel a bit like Jerry Hall at Studio 54!

 

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For a long time I wanted to sew a peplum blouse. I think this style is really flattering, accentuating the waist and the gathered peplum gives you a curvier look. It’s really feminime. 

 The pattern really inspired me with the fabric choice. As you can see, the illustration shows a striped fabric. And I had a striped fabric for years in my stash. I think it’s a match made in heaven. Ok, maybe I’m exaggurating a little, but still.

Source

It was really hard to cut everything out of the fabric. Not only because of the stripes, but I hadn’t enough fabric for this pattern. But with som trial and error and a little bit of cheating I made it work. 

I had to make the hem width of the skirt a couple of inches smaller otherwise I wouldn’t make it. The skirt doesn’t have a waistband, but a facing. originally the centre front and back parts of the skirt needed to be cut along the fold. I couldn’t do this, and had to add a seam. 

i really stepped out of my comfortzone, using a bold striped fabric. Normally I’m more into floral prints. I’m not sure if it’s totally my cup of tea. What do you think?

As always you can fin more on my blog

 

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