Aaaaaaaaaaahhh! Aaaaaahhhhh! And other assorted screaming….

The production company behind The Great British Sewing Bee is making an American version and they would love to find some people who sew vintage. In other words, you!

I’m so incredibly excited about this I might explode. For goodness sake, if you’ve entertained the idea of being on the show for even a millisecond, apply by sending an email and current picture to sewingcasting@loveproductionsusa.com! Are you going to apply? Let us know in the comments…

 

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I recently attended Dapper Day, a vintage-themed event at Walt Disney World in the Magic Kingdom. It was a Disney and vintage-lover’s dream! I sewed two dresses for the occasion, one for me (in red) and one for my friend Andi (in blue).

Disney Dapper Day

Disney Dapper Day

 

 

 

 

For my dress, I sewed Butterick 8408 ,a 1958 pattern. I love the bow detail at the neckline and waist. It had some interesting construction details, included a zipper inserted into a dart! The skirt was also tremendously full, which ended out working great for petticoat-wearing.

Butterick 8408

For my friend Andi, I sewed a pattern I designed and drafted myself that has a bit of a nod to the 1940s. It has six darts at the neckline, cap sleeves, and a full skirt. I call it “The Marfa Dress,” after a town in Texas that has mysterious lights.

Marfa Dress for Disney

It was the most magical of days! See all my Dapper Day posts on my blog.  There’s loads more there about the event, as well as construction details for both of our dresses!

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I’m trying to find a modern pattern equivelent for the dress in the image below.

I’d be happy if I could even find the correct ‘shape’ to cut out to get that 1970′s collar. But I can’t find a tutorial anywhere….surely someones done it before.

I’m hoping you can help me. I think I can use my shirtdress pattern (I’ll have to compromise with a button down the front) but its the collar I always have trouble with….if I can get me a basic 1970s blouse shape It would give me a base to work from.

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This project took what felt like forever and were in fact three years. In autumn and early winter I never had time to finish it and after christmas motivation was gone because I so longed for spring.

It was one of the first vintage pattern I ever bought and I had no experience in sewing with these at all. This led to a number of mistakes and a wrong sizing, most of them clearly visible in the final coat, at least to me.

Fabric is a felted cotton, the lining matches the colour of the burgundy bias binding accentuating the front seams. Pattern is a 40ies Beyer-Pattern, the coat is meant to be a “traditional style”-coat and with it came patterns for different dresses, blouses and skirts, all in “dirndl”-style.

An enumeration of all the things that went wrong as well as more photos can be found on my blog www.parvasedapta.ch.

Thank you very much for reading, love

ette

 

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Hi guys and gals!

I’ve finally finished making Gertie’s Shaheen-inspired sarong dress (Butterick B6019) and I hope you like it!

The pattern:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My version:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This pattern was HARD! If you want the full story, it’s on my blog here.

The fabric is an indigenous hand-printed cotton from the Babbarra Women’s Centre, available from Spotlight (Australia).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The dress definitely needed a little bolero, and Butterick 6087 (from 1952) looked like a good match.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While the dress nearly drove me mad, the bolero was very easy – which I greatly appreciated by the time I came to sew it!

If you’ve been thinking of sewing this pattern, definitely give it a go but don’t get down-hearted if it’s a bit of a struggle. Unpick, resew, keep going – you’ll have a killer dress in the end.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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VintageSaddleBagHi All!

I wasn’t at all certain this post would be welcome here because this baby is not a garment but an accessory! Anywho here goes, hope you all still find it interesting and inspiring!

This gorgeous retro-inspired bicycle saddle bag was not actually made by me… but by my ridiculously clever husband! I just had to share it with vintage lovers and since this is where I share my vintage makes I thought it would be the place.

I’m so very proud and awed by my vintage bike mad, non-sewing, non-leatherworking hubby who conceived of the idea, created the design from scratch (including drafting the pattern), sourced the leather and hardware, dyed and finished the leather himself, and then sewed it completely by hand. The man’s talents are limitless.

The part I like about it the best? That I could easily see it tweaked to make an amazing 70′s style shoulder bag with long strap… I may have already put an order in! If you’d like to see more feel free to pop over to my blog to check out the deets.

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Hi there!

This is my very first post on this site as well as the very first dress I have put out there on the world wide web!

It’s very exciting!!

I love vintage and vintage inspired clothing, accessories…well everything really. I wanted to create a perfectly fitting vintage inspired dress pattern that I could use time and time again, changing the necklines and skirts for different looks.

So, I took this vintage pattern as a base…

I have searched the internet for more details on Reveille patterns but I can’t find anything. Does anyone out there know anything about them?

I spent many hours tweeking the bodice for the perfect fit (seem my blog for more details). But it was all worth it.

Here it is, the finished product…

Since my fabric features lighthouses and boats, I thought it would be a great idea to head down to the beach for photos.

Unfortunately, it was freezing cold and blowing a hooligan, hence the crazy hair and pained expression.

And a sneak peek at the inside of the dress. I love bias binding seams and hems. It makes it so tidy!

I’ve shortened the length of the dress for a slightly more modern silhouette so that I can wear it for work if I want to. I might make another one in a proper 1950s mid-calf length for the weekends :-)

Thanks for reading, I hope to see you all again really soon!

Love, Eliza Brown x

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To be honest, I’m not entirely sure I should publish this here.

Some vintage inspiration definitely went into making this jumpsuit but I’ll be the first to admit that it’s a bit of a mish-mash of styles.

The leg shape was inspired by some of the hobble dresses from the 1910′s. Because I wouldn’t much like to eh… hobble, I made trousers rather than a skirt.

The bodice is rather similar to what I would use for a 1950′s style dress and at first viewing, my boyfriend was thinking 1980′s (which I didn’t really like).

And yet, I kind of like it. After all, who can resist a garment you can twirl in? I look forward to wearing it when it gets colder again (spring has really started this week, here in the Netherlands)

More about the jumpsuit (the pattern for which I drafted myself, as usual) on my blog

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30s coat pocket

I made our little niece a vintage tweed coat using a 1930s Pictorial Review pattern:

Pictorial Review 6128

Pictorial Review 6128

In true 1930s spirit, all the materials were re-purposed or came from my stash. We had some purple Woolrich tweed and black lining, and I cut the pocket flaps from an old pair of leather gloves. The buttons are vintage Civil Defence buttons from wartime Britain.

This was an experiment in both coat-making and tailoring for me. The pattern instructions said to pad stitch only the undercollar, and because the coat is a size 1 there could only be so much hand sewing. I love working with wool and heavy fabrics, so the project was a lot of fun, especially the pockets and lapels.

Here are some photos of the finished coat:

1930s child's coat front

1930s child's coat - front view

1930s child's coat - back view

1930s child's coat - back view

Here’s a closeup of the front buttons. I also tried out some handworked keyhole buttonholes:

Civil Defence buttons

Civil Defence buttons

For more details and tailoring progress pics see my blog post.

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I made a cape and so far it’s perfect and I love it!

I used Vogue 6032 from 1963 and I used a charcoal wool with purple satin lining. It’s fairly warm, except for the no-sleeves bit so it’s perfect for the spring now that it’s starting to warm up.

I had a bit of trouble converting all the hand stitching in the pattern instructions to my new serger (as I’m fairly inexperienced with both hand-stitching and serging), but I think it came out really well.

It took a bit of practice to get used to walking with my arms out front instead of to the sides, but really it’s like going out with a fashionable blanket on so how can you go wrong??

More construction details and pictures on my blog.

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