From 1929

voor1Today, I finally finished this dress! Tracing out the pattern for it was the first sewing related thing I did this year but it took me three months to actually finish it. Normally, I sew pretty quickly but this time, I kept being held up by other things, other sewing and the need to find the right fabric.

And in the end, I think it is for the best that I had some time to let the toile “marinade” on the sewing room table. The dress was way too sack-shaped initially and I think the solution I came up with in the end is much better than anything I considered back in January.

2This was the pattern. A wedding dress from Gracieuse magazine nr. 16 from 1929 (this magazine was published twice a month). I shortened the skirt so it would not be a wedding dress.

1This was the toile. Very, very baggy.

In the end, I adjusted it by simply taking out 10 cm at center front. This meant sacrificing the cowl-neck (one of the features for which I chose the dress) but fixing all the other issues.

zij1

 

voor4

I am very pleased with the finished dress. 1920’s styles are always tricky. Their loose shapes are just so far removed from anything we are used to. I think this one is a happy medium though: I think it can still be recognized as a 1920’s look but it also looks sleek and elegant to my eyes which are attuned to more modern styles (usually starting in 1947…)

As usual, there is more about the dress, including more pictures, on my blog

That’s A Wrap! (vintage Simplicity 4130 Review + BONUS comparison to modern Butterick B6285)

Hi all! It’s been a long time since I’ve come onto We Sew Retro to look around and contribute, it’s good to be back.

S4130

I sewed up vintage Simplicity 4130 a while back and just got around to reviewing it. All in all, it was a great pattern to work with. I converted it to use a knit fabric, but a friend of mine sewed it up in woven and it turned out just as lovely. So it’s a versatile pattern as well! My favorite part is that it’s reversible!

dscf0985

dscf1013

Since it’s so similar to Gertie’s new pattern Butterick B6285, I asked a blogger friend who’s used it, Christina of Gussets and Godets, for her thoughts, as it could be a convenient substitute if you can’t locate Simplicity 4130. Doesn’t Christina look cute? It’s a great match to the vintage pattern.

IMG_2472

 

Thoughts about working with Simplicity 4130 and more photos on the blog, thanks for stopping by!

 

vogue 6879 – a big plaid dress

I think like a lot of sew-ers, I seem to keep buying the same pattern over and over, well not the sam1e, but the same style, I am generally drawn to

16879 – a line dresses (pockets a bonus)

2 – empire line

3 – funnel neckline

 

 

 

 

and this pattern had all three.  I also had some plaid leftover that had just made a disappointing skirt, and as I looked at thrown over mannequin, I thought it would make a better dress.    I managed to squeeze the dress pattern, and I put the hem line as near to crease of knee as I could – this is the hemline that seems to suit me best as I only really wear flat shoes and I think it gives a flattering proportion to me anyway….

 

..OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The cut didnt take long, and it was a quick sew.  I attached the lining to the panels as it seemed the most straightforward approach.  Its a great pattern and I would highly recommend, although the only drawback (and its minor) is the cut of neckline and sleeve cap does make movement slightly restrictive, so not really a dress for housework!

 

1920s Silk Blouse and Pleated Skirt

After admiring everyone else’s achievements last year for A Stitching Odyssey’s Vintage Pledge I decided that this year I was going to join in. My own pledge was to challenge and push myself with my sewing. I’ve just finished my first outfit for the pledge, a 1920s silk blouse and pleated skirt. I created the pattern for the blouse by tracing around a simple silk top I already had and then making my own adjustments. The pattern for the skirt was McCall’s M7022 pleated skirt which I lengthened to a more suitable 1920s style.

1920s blouse, skirt and cloche hat

I used a beautiful Pre-Raphaelite inspired green and purple floral silk for the blouse which I bought from the fabulous ClothSpot and this was my first challenge. I’d never worked with silk before so was really, really nervous about starting it and I put it off for about four months. The Vintage Pledge was just what I needed to force myself to be brave and just get on with it. As it turned out there was nothing to worry about!

Pre-Raphaelite inspired silk fabric

I added vintage, probably early 20th Century, jet buttons to both the front of the blouse and at the side to close the band around the bottom.

1920s blouse, skirt and cloche hat

The skirt is in a black cotton twill that I dug out from my stash. I’m not overly happy with it, mainly because the fabric is all wrong for the style of skirt, it’s way too stiff. I’m not sure if I’ll try and adjust it or just make a different one.

If you would like to read more about how the whole outfit and see more photos feel free to pop over to my blog. And while you’re there why not check out my latest post where I’m running a giveaway of £40 to spend on fabrics at ClothSpot. (Giveaway ends midnight 20th March 2016)

Retro Pencil Skirt

Another project in my quest for a me-made placement wardrobe – the pencil skirt from Gertie’s New Book for Better Sewing! I sewed it up in a gorgeous chocolate-coloured wool that belonged to my great-aunt.

Chocolate Pencil Skirt

This pattern came together so quickly and easily; I absolutely love how it turned out! The style is very flattering, too – I’m so pleased to have such a chic and elegant skirt to wear to placement :) I also added a few extra vintage touches: bias bound seams and a lace trim on the hem – I think it’s little touches like this which make all the difference!

Read all about it and see more photos here on my blog!

Until next time,

Miss Maddy xx