· Vintage Petticoat Comparison ·

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Anyone who wears 1950s styles will know that a good petticoat will take your dress from “meh” to “fabulous” in an instant! But the world of petticoats can also be overwhelming and, let’s face it, expensive. I’ve tried several different styles in the 7+ years I’ve been wearing vintage and I’m excited to finally put all my thoughts in one place! I have a few economical ideas, a few reviews of popular reproduction brands, and mainly- loads of photos! Hop on over to my blog, Mode de Lis, for the full run-down!

Happy petticoating! I’d also love to hear of any experiences you’ve had with petticoats- do you have any favorites?

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They don’t make it anymore the way they used to

Some time ago (oh my, 2 years to be precise) one lady from my family had heard about the fact I’m sewing and she approached me with a request.

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In general I don’t grant “would sew me this or that” favors, but there were 3 things that made the situation different that time:
1) the lady had a fabric that we both loved
2) she has waited patiently for me to sew the dress for 2 years without as much as a word of hurrying me up
3) she wanted to have a dress like the ones worn in her youth, that is the late 60s. She sighed, looked at the clothes in her closet and said “They just don’t make it anymore the way they used to in the 1960s, you know”.

 

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The trick was that she only had a 140cm (about 1,5 yards) of the fabric. I chose Simplicity 1609, a 60s repro, because if the iconic and clearly defined A-line of the dress and clever shaping with only 4 main pieces, but the pattern called for at least 170cm of fabric.
That is why, my dear Readers, the print is awfully mismatched at the seams.
Have mercy.

The back

The back

I changed the fastening- instead of a long back zipper I made a small opening at the neck with a tiny button and a loop made of a strip os bias-cut self-fabric with the stretch steamed out of it. As you can see in one of the photos above, I also made a small string-like belt to help with accentuating the waist.

 

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Because I had so little fabric, I hemmed it with a help of white satin bias ribbon, hand stitched (as always) to avoid marking the fabric from the outside.

I invite you to visit my blog, rvdzik.blogspot.com, to read more about the pattern alterations and see the photos of the insides of the dress :-)

Chocolate Bonbon 1950s Dress

 

 

 

On my blog today, I’m sharing about a dress I made earlier this year in a super-fun polka dot pattern.  The pink accents on the brown background reminded me so of chocolate bonbons, I couldn’t help but name the dress as such!!  ;)

The dress features a rever-type color, edged with ricrac, and a center front opening.  The sleeves have a slit detail that is edged with ricrac as well.

Hop over to my blog to read more about the details!!  :)  Have a great week, ladies!

Vintage Butterick 8038- Flamingo Version!

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I was such a huge fan of my first version of vintage Butterick 8038 that I knew another version was the perfect excuse to buy this fabric!

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I know I must really love this pattern if it meant that the fabric successfully avoided a, ahem, maturing period in the stash… ;-) I made the dress just as called for on the pattern and it quickly became my ultimate favorite summer dress! The fabric came from Hobby Lobby (they’ve had such great prints this year!).

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Stop by my blog for some more details and photos- Mode de Lis

My first blouse

70s Blouse

I’m a newbie, newish to sewing and brand new to WeSewRetro. Vintage sewing and I have had a bit of a rocky road on the way to where we are now. I’ll admit at first, I didn’t see the appeal.

Then my great aunt heard that I wanted to sew and sent me a box of patterns she had used when she was a school sewing teacher. The patterns ranged from mid 60s – mid 70s, and slowly as I looked through them all I kinda fell in love with the style.

Style 4721I used Style 4721 from 1974 and made View 2, but shortened the sleeves. I also used snaps instead of buttons. The fabric is vintage cotton that I inherited from my grandmother, so I’m not sure how old it is.

 

Close up

This is the first blouse I have ever sewn, and while it’s not perfect I’m actually pretty stoked with it. I’m really digging the neck tie. I think this is definitely a pattern I will make again.

 

Retro Upcycled Dottie Angel Frock Using Vintage Laura Ashley Textiles

Dottie Angel Frock by Karen Vallerius

I used to wear pinafore frocks like these back in the day, so when I saw this Dottie Angel frock all over Pinterest I decided I had to try the pattern out (Simplicity 1080).  I adapted the pattern by using a vintage 80s Laura Ashley floral button through skirt as the main body of the frock.  The hemline contrast section was an earlier 70s Laura Ashley cotton and the pockets were cut from a 90s 00s LA blouse.  Following photos show the textiles more closely.

Will definitely be trying this in the “dress” style too.  I love vintage florals from the 70s and 80s by Liberty of London, Laura Ashley & Marion Donaldson and plan to make many more “pieced” garments using treasured textiles from my stash.  Please visit my blog if you would like to read more

 

Dottie Angel Frock by Karen Vallerius

Dottie Angel Frock by Karen Vallerius