A Tutorial ~ DIY Vintage Hair Tie

Remember the vintage styled hair tie I debuted in this outfit post?  Today I want to show you how to make your own version of this cute hair accessory! This tutorial is great if you have a hankering to try sewing, and would like a simple, easy project to begin with.

If you already have sewing skills, you can just download the free pattern for The Vintage Bow Hair Tie and jump right in!  {Note: You still might want to skip down to the end for the giveaway however!   ♡~ (^ ε ^) }

VBHT-Tut_21

Materials you will need:

  • Fabric:  92cm (36.5”) x 12cm (4.75”)  or  46cm (18.5”) x 24cm (9.5”)
  • Sewing Machine
  • Thread to match fabric
  • Needle for hand sewing
  • Fabric Scissors
  • Vintage Bow Hair Tie Pattern
  • Pins

Vintage Bow Hair Tie Pattern:  Download here

VBHT-Pattern_1

How to make your own Vintage Hair Tie:

VBHT-Tut_1

Step One:  Print out Vintage Bow Hair Tie Pattern twice, and cut out pattern pieces. There should be four in all.

VBHT-Tut_2

Step Two:  Join pattern pieces together as indicated.  The broken line tabs should go under the un-broken line tabs.  The last piece of the pattern, the rounded tip piece will have to be upside down to sit correctly.  The pattern should end up looking like a very long canoe!

VBHT-Tut_3

Step Three:  Fold your fabric over and place pattern on top.

VBHT-Tut_4

Step Four:  Slide any excess fabric back under so that the raw edge of the fabric is under the bottom edge of the pattern, and the fold of the fabric under the top edge of the pattern. This way, when you cut the fabric, there will be very little waste.

VBHT-Tut_5

Step Five:  Cut fabric.

(Option): If you have the smaller width of fabric you can ‘piece’ this pattern together by cutting HALF of the pattern TWICE as shown above.

VBHT-Tut_6

You should end up with a piece like the one on top if you cut the whole pattern, or two pieces like the ones on the bottom if you cut half of the pattern twice.

VBHT-Tut_7

Step Six (Option for pieced pattern):  If you have pieced the pattern, put the right side {the bright side of the print} of the fabric together and pin.

VBHT-Tut_8

Step Seven (Option for pieced pattern):  Sew along the straight edge to join the two pieces of fabric together.  Allow 1/4” to 1/2’’” for the seam allowance.

VBHT-Tut_9

Step Eight:  Fold the fabric in half ~ right sides together.

VBHT-Tut_10

VBHT-Tut_16

Step Nine:  Starting at one end, allowing 1/2” for the seam allowance, sew along the outside edge of the fabric.  (Option):  You can sew this seam by machine, or by hand.

VBHT-Tut_11

Step Ten:  Leave a 1 1/2” gap at the opposite end to pull the fabric through the right way.

VBHT-Tut_12

Step Eleven:  Pull the fabric from the inside of the tube, turning it the right way out.

VBHT-Tut_13

Step Twelve:  Press flat with an iron.

VBHT-Tut_14

Step Thirteen:  Tuck the raw edge of the gap in and press.

VBHT-Tut_17

Step Fourteen:  Thread needle, and sew up gap. Start off by passing the needle from inside the fabric tube to the outside, so that the knot end stays hidden inside. You can use the “Stitch in the Ditch” technique to hide your hand sewing, as explained below.

VBHT-Tut_18

The idea behind the “Stitch in the Ditch” technique is to hide your stitches inside the seam, such that you cannot see the stitches once you have finished.  To stitch in the ditch, you pass the needle through the fabric that is tucked INSIDE the gap, and repeat a little further along on the opposite side.  Continue up the sides until the gap is ‘bridged’ by the rows of stitches.

VBHT-Tut_19

The hand sewing sits below the crease made by pressing the raw edges in, and when you pull it tight, it closes the gap and hides the stitches.  Knot your work, and pass the needle down into the seam and out through the fabric. Pull the thread taunt when you snip, and the tail of the thread will pull back and disappear into the inside of your fabric tube.  Invisible stitches!

VBHT-Tut_20

Step Fifteen:  Enjoy your new vintage-inspired hair tie!  A fabulous accessory for those ‘around the house’ days to keep your hair out of your face, or when you are fancied up for day out in your favourite dress.  Make a new one every time you sew up a project and you can have co-ordinated hair and wardrobe!

༺ ♡ ༻

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and have fun making your own vintage hair tie. If you have any questions about anything at all, please don’t hesitate to ask and I’ll do my best to help out.

As always, I’d love to see your creations so please do let me know about them ~ you can share by leaving a comment or link to a blog post, tweet a picture @bjvear or share on Instagram by mentioning @missbjvear, or hashtag #DIYLavenderandTwill so I can take a peek!

VBHT-Tut_21

༺ ♡ ༻

Now for the exciting part:

Giveaway

If you’d like the chance to win this sweet floral print hair tie, check out my blog Lavender & Twill for more details!

 

xox,

bonita

༺ ♡ ༻

Find me:

Instagram | missbjvear
Pinterest | bjvear
Ravelry | BJVear
Twitter | bjvear
Youtube | Bonita Vear

All patterns and instructions copyright to BJVear Studio. Available for personal use only, no commercial rights allowed.

Spring for Cotton – Simplicity 1782

Here is my finished Spring for Cotton project! A 1940s blouse using Simplicity 1782. I’m also counting this towards my list of Vintage Pattern Sewing Pledge projects. :)

Simplicity 1782 wasn’t originally on my list of patterns to make for the Vintage Pattern Sewing Pledge or Spring for Cotton because at the time I didn’t own a copy. One popped up on Ebay but couldn’t bring myself to spend $40.00 for a blouse pattern. Le sigh.  Much to my delight another copy came up for sale, again on the evil bay, and I was determined not to miss out this time! As you will see, I decided to test this pattern in some quilting cotton from the stash. But I have other fabrics destined to become tops. I’m thinking of making either View 1 or 2 from this semi-sheer white on white cotton and another version of View 3 in the yellow and white. :) Something bright for spring!

Overall I’m pretty happy with how this turned out and I think I have a very wearable muslin/mock up. It does have some minor fitting issues to work out. I found that the waist seam hit at exactly the same level as my skirt waistband and the waistband of my favorite high waisted pants. This makes it look and feel a little awkward. I think shortening the waist would help a little bit. Also, and maybe it’s just the color and/or material I used but when I first tried this blouse on it looked very much like a maternity top. Adding a dark belt helped somewhat. Quilting cotton may be just a little too stiff for this blouse, just my two cents. The next time I make it will be with a much softer cotton. I have a few more photos on my blog if you would like to see them.

Summary of the Pattern
Fabric:
Quilting cotton
Pattern: Simplicity 1782, View 3, Size 14/32″ bust
Year: 1946
Notions: Thread, bias tape, snaps.
How historically accurate is it? Not bad. The fabric is not a reproduction print but I think it has a cute vintage feel to it.
Any tricky parts to the pattern? Not really. This pattern seemed to go together really fast and easy.
Did you change anything? The pattern calls for 5/8″ seams but I found the blouse to be a little snug in the waist and difficult to put on and take off. I changed the seams to 3/8″ and this helped.When I make this again, which I plan to do, I will build in a little extra seam allowance.
Time to complete: 3 to 4 hours
First worn: Yesterday for photos.
Total cost: All the materials were from the stash! Yeah! I think I paid around $12 for the pattern.
Notes: Next time I will a more ease to the waist. Also shorten the waist a little bit.

And this photo. Because, flamingos! For those who may not know I’m hosting a “Color Recipes for Spring” photo contest, and there are still a few days left. You can read the details on how to enter here. (The deadline has been move to Sunday May 3rd!) For inspiration see this post and my interpretation of the color descriptions here.

Going Dotty for Spotty Cotton

1940's blouse made with Simplicity 1590 retro re-release | Lavender & Twill

Full 1940's look for autumn | Lavender & Twill 

Peplum details & box pleats from Simplicity 1590 | Lavender & Twill

Adore platform chunky heels & gloves for a perfect 1940's look | Lavender & Twill

Details of the fabric & buttons for my Simplicity 1590 make | Lavender & Twill

Simplicity 1590 sewn up out of quilting cotton | Lavender & Twill

Ohmygoodnessyouguys! I keep signing myself up for all these sewing challenges ~ and then I don’t know why I am doing this to myself!  (> o <)’

First it was the insane Sewing All The Things idea, then I saw A Stitching Odyssey’sVintage Sewing Pattern Pledge and of course I was all “Oooh! That looks like fun!” so I put my name down:

I, Bonita Vear of Lavender & Twill, pledge to sew at least five vintage or vintage reproduction patterns in 2015 ~ these MUST be patterns that I haven’t used before from my stash!”

Because that fits into my sewing schedule for 2015, right? But then I saw Rochelle’s Spring for Cotton group sew along annndddd ~ BAM! April’s plan for the Simplicity 2275 wrap dress flew out the window {also because I was in the middle of a top secret sewing project that took most of April to get done}.  Hello quick project! This fit in with Brittany’s 40s Fashion Calender challenge for February which I was behind with: sew a 1940’s blouse and turban.

So last Monday I went to Spotlight with a handy Christmas gift card {thank you Mom!} and tried to find the perfect cotton fabric to use for Simplicity 1590, a retro re-release of this simple, but cute 1940’s blouse with a peplum.

1590_TP_EN_H5_U5.indd
~ I hadn’t made this one up yet, but I really liked View A and couldn’t wait to try it! ~

I found the perfect 100% cotton quilting fabric with a really nice ‘hand’ to it. It was soft, and it draped nicely, as well as having this fabulous vintage-looking print in the colours I wanted ~ navy and white.  Well, okay, I wanted navy, white, and red, and ended up with navy, cream, orange, and pink! But it was the closest to what I had pictured in my head and I knew it would suit this project perfectly.

Disaster struck when I reached the cutting counter ~ I needed 1.7 metres of my magical fabric and there was only a little over 1 metre left on the bolt!  Yikes!

The lady at the counter went to see if she could find some more of the fabric, or something similar, while I racked my brains to figure out how to make it work. I knew she wouldn’t find anything as I had already scoured the quilting fabric isle and sure enough, she came back empty handed.  I quickly whipped out my pattern pieces {which I had traced out onto Polytrace so that I didn’t have to cut the pattern tissue} and proceeded to lay my pattern out on the cutting counter!  It just fit ~ but I’d have to make something up for the peplum, which took about 70 centimetres of the 1.7m needed all by itself.

I decided to wing it because I had fallen for this spotty cotton ~ it was “The One” for this pattern ~ sewers, you know what I’m talking about!

It did work, although you’ll notice box pleats at the back of the peplum, rather than gathers. I had much less fabric in the peplum so there really wasn’t any way I was getting gathers out of it. And obviously, I had to nix the matching turban because that just wasn’t going to happen ~ but in the end, I did it!

I squeaked out a blouse that needed 1.7m of fabric from a piddley 1m and managed to fit in a matching vintage styled hair tie instead of the turban.  Which I am calling the “Vintage Bow Hair Tie” pattern. Original. (ง •̀_•́)ง

I think I can hail this 40s Fashion Calender/Spring for Cotton/Vintage Sewing Pattern Pledge project as success ~ one 100% cotton blouse, sewn with 100% cotton thread, and a matching 100% cotton hair tie, also sewn with 100% cotton thread.  A little bit of tweaking here and there, and I couldn’t get 100% cotton buttons, but I’m okay with the ones I picked.   : P   Actually, more than okay, because I’m a little bit dotty over them too….  ❤ ❤ ❤ヽ(*⌒∇⌒*)ノ

The result is that I adore this blouse!  It will definitely be a staple in my wardrobe. All the stress is so worth it in that pivotal moment you see some gorgeous fabric slowly coming together then ~ POW! (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧ You have a new garment!

~ Project Details ~

  • Year: 2013 re-release of a 1940’s pattern
  • Pattern: Simplicity 1590
  • Fabric: 1 metre of DS Piccadilly Floral Spot 100% cotton quilting fabric in Navy, Cream, Orange and Pink ($11.89)
  • Notions: Five buttons with violet print on them ($5.00)
  • Time to complete: One week
  • Make again? Yes! I’m pretty sure I will. I love the neckline of this pattern, and it’s a really simple blouse to put together.  It’s fun.
  • Wear again? 100%!  I can see this blouse becoming quite a central piece to my 1940’s outfits. It’s easy to wear and I love the print, the colours, and the style. I’m so thrilled with how it turned out.
  • Total Cost:  $16.89 AUD

Have any of you sewn up Simplicity 1590?  Which version would you sew if you did?

xox,

bonita

༺ ♡ ༻

Find me:

Instagram | missbjvear
Pinterest | bjvear
Ravelry | BJVear
Twitter | bjvear
Youtube | Bonita Vear

Flirty Flamingo Playsuit

This month I decided to join in for #SpringForCotton hosted by the lovely Rochelle over at Lucky Lucille.
 http://luckylucille.com/2015/03/spring-for-cotton/
Then I stumbled onto The Monthly Stitch and saw that the challenge for the month of April was “Put a BIRD on it!”  I hadn’t written for The Monthly Stitch at that point, so I thought I’d give a challenge a go!

So, since flamingos are, in fact, birds, I decided to stitch up and use this flirty little play-suit to complete both challenges!
As you know from my last post I spent the last two glorious weeks in the Sunshine State enjoying some lovely times with my family. I just managed to get this finished up in the last few days of vacation and had the chance to have it photographed with the lovely palm trees. I miss palm trees so much. But I digress.
This play-suit is a mash-up of McCall’s M6969 and the skirt from Vogue V9000. I did view C of the romper and just used the skirt pattern as a template for the gores.

My fabric for this project is this lovely,vibrant, flamingo print, 100% cotton, shirting and a solid pink quilting cotton. I’d been eyeing the flamingo print for about four months and happened to go in with a 50% off coupon and snagged 5 yards of this for only $25! That’s a huge bargain as far as I’m concerned.

I also settled on self-covered buttons for this project.

For the construction of the first part, the romper, I decided that I wanted to do a solid color top and use the flamingo print on the bottom. I wanted it to look as if it were two pieces without actually being so. I also liked the idea of being able to wear the romper by itself with a belt and have it still look like a two piece set.

I added the white bias binding on all of the hems. I really liked how the contrast of the white played against the brighter colors.

Due to the long trip and baggage regulations, I was only able to bring limited supplies with me to my mom’s. Luckily, she is also a sewist and was willing to share her sewing room with me during my stay.

That also included getting to sew it up on her Husqvarna Viking Designer 1!! This thing sews like a dream. Seriously, it’s worth every very expensive penny. While I hope my mother lives forever, I also hope she leaves this to me in her will… unless she decides one day to upgrade and feels the need to pass this on to me. I wouldn’t complain one bit.

Lovely woman that my mother is, she also played my photographer for this project. Usually I just photograph my makes on Millie, my dress form. Unfortunately, she was still at home in Ohio and my mother doesn’t have one. So that meant, I had to get dolled up and get outside and in front of the camera. We are by no means professionals, but they didn’t turn out to bad for cell phone pics.

So there you have it. This is #vintagepledge make number 3 for me! I’m over half way to my goal of 5 for the year. I guess it’s time to unpack, clean up and figure out what my next project will be!! Find more of my work at www.shessewbettie.blogspot.com!!

Much love!!

blognametag

My 1950’s suit

Hi everyone. I’m happy to reveal my new suit. I’ve thought about making a 1950’s style suit for a couple of years but now I have finally given it a go.

voor1For this suit, I used a peculiar fabric from my stash, a linen tweed. The hand is a bit weird, stiff and limp at the same time, which makes it misbehave in the skirt. For the jacket, I used a very lightweight fusible interfacing which took care for those issues.

62feea25124bfe73dde117956820b93aI drafted my own pattern based on this picture from an issue of the Dutch ladies’ magazine Libelle. 

10312768_438598262982827_235609074456462868_nFor the hat, I used V8008 which has been in my stash for years, in fact, for longer than any of my vintage patterns. I made the pillbox from the suit fabric, interfaced it with mid-weight fusible cotton and lined it with thin synthetic felt. Instead of the flower decorations included in the pattern, I put a large flat bow from the same fabric on the back, tied up with a ribbon in a bow.

voor:zij1It’s not perfect, but nevertheless, I’m quite pleased with my suit. You can see more pictures and read more about it on my blog.

achter2

1920s White Lightning Dress

Greetings everyone! I’d like to share with you the dress I made for the Greater Boston Vintage Society’s White Lightning Ball. The event was held back in March at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum. I had a couple people tell me I looked like Lady Edith from Downton Abbey! :)

I made a new dress using a 1920s pattern – Vogue 9010 – that I purchased over the winter. I used a lovely ivory silk that I purchased from Deletable Mountain Cloth during their winter sale. The silk struck me as very Art Deco and I really liked the design and feel of it. So light weight. I used a cotton muslin to test the pattern. It looks rather odd because I didn’t have enough fabric to cut the full length of the right front panel. Not really an issue though as this was just a mock up. The dress is made from a back panel cut on the fold with little darts at the neck, a left front, a right front, girdle, as well as bodice and skirt cascades. I left the sleeves off . The right front crosses over the left and attaches with a series of snaps on the bodice and hips. The girdle is sewn into one side seam then wraps around the back and attaches at the opposite hip. I added a few extra snaps for good measure. Because my silk was rather delicate I made little cotton patches to go behind the snaps for extra support.

The pattern gives you the option of either hemming the edges or trimming off the seam allowance and adding a binding. My original plan was to only use a yellow/gold trim because I wanted to pair the dress with gold shoes. The binding was sewn first to the right side of the silk then folded over and pressed and hand sewn in place.

Summary of the Pattern
Fabric: Silk from Delectable Mountain Cloth
Pattern: Vogue 9010
Year: 1920s
Notions: Snaps, thread, pink and yellow China silk ribbon for binding
How historically accurate is it? Very.
Any tricky parts to the pattern? Not really
Did you change anything? Left off the sleeves for more of an evening look. Shortened the hem about 1 1/2″. I also added some additional snaps to the waist/hip area and some extra shirring to the girdle. The dress was a little high under the arms so I cut the arm holes a little deeper.
Time to complete: ummm, hard to say. I worked on it off and one for about 2 weeks.
First worn: March 28th, 2015 for the GBVS 2nd White Lightening Ball at the Larz Anderson Car Museum
Wear Again? Yes.
Notes: Due to the cascades and overall feel of this particular style, this pattern does need to be made with fabric that drapes nicely. One should also avoid fabrics with an obvious right and wrong side. My mock up was made using a cotton muslin which didn’t really hang right. It worked well for determining the overall fit of the pattern however and allowed me to mark up the fabric as needed. If I make this pattern again, which I would like to for day wear, I might try it with crepe and a contrasting cascade.

More photos and construction pictures on my blog.