Parrot Print Gathered Skirt

I love big novelty print skirts! Novelty skirts are kind of a staple of 40’s and 50’s fashion.

While I do love novelty print skirts, I actually have very few in my wardrobe. Since I get my fabric second hand I don’t usually come about interesting prints, mostly solids or modest floral prints.

However, when I came across this lovely vintage (or at least old) parrot print fabric I knew I was destined to make myself a novelty skirt.

Akram's Ideas: Parrot Print Gathered Skirt

This print makes the prefect Novelty Skirt

Originally I wanted to make a nice full circle skirt but alas, I didn’t have enough fabric. So in the end, I did a traditional gather skirt with waistband.

While the light weight cotton or print may not be autumn appropriate I’m still very happy with this skirt and can’t wait to get some serious wear out of it this summer.

Akram's Ideas: Parrot Print Gathered Skirt

Can’t wait to wear this next summer

To read more about my process for this fun novelty skirt see my blog Akram’s Ideas (http://akramsideas.com/vintage-inspired-gathered-skirt-parrot-print/)

Tutorial: How to Sew Heart Pockets – Sweeten up Any Make! Ft. Tilly and the Buttons Coco Dress

Hi everyone!

Welcome to my first sewing tutorial! I love sewing with jersey and as I’m trying to sew some more everyday items and cosy Autumn pieces, it’s time to get creative with it! I recently picked up this beautiful ponte roma jersey with another 60s style Coco dress in mind and I think this classic black and white stripe is dying for a red colour pop. In the form of a cute heart pocket of course!…

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For my full heart pocket tutorial & images, check out my blog The Crafty Pinup.

Thank you!
xo

Awesome Autumn Dress

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This ia a 60’s inspired dress. Its made with a very fine cord and is slightly A line and has a funnel neck and bishop sleeves.

The pattern is one from Burdastyle (September 2015), but is easily customised to that vintage feel.

I altered the sleeves and added the funnel neck to achieve the desired effect. I know 60’s dresses are much shorter than this one, but I’m not comfortable with miniskirt length these days.

You can find more details on my blog autumn-dress-6.

Vintage for Halloween and Everyday

I just love when I get to do a Halloween costume that will be worn as an everyday outfit as well. Because who really wants to put a ton of work into a dress that will only be worn once. I was beyond thrilled when I asked my 2 year old daughter what she wanted to be for Halloween this year and she responded with an enthusiastic, Lucy!! Followed by her favorite quote, “do you poop out at parties?”.

Her dress was created by altering a pattern I already had on hand (The Dainty Darling dress) in one of my favorite sewing books, “Sew Classic Clothes for Girls” by Lindsay Wilkes.

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My dress was created using Butterick’s B6018.

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I have to admit, I am so beyond pleased with this pattern. I think I am going to have to sew it up again in view b.

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But the best part of our costumes, is the fact that only the aprons were the costume-y bits and we can wear our dresses out again for a wonderfully vintage mommy and me look!

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You can read more about my make at my blog, Seams Sew Retro.

Spider Web Taffeta Circle Skirt

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I really do try my best to buy natural fibers, I’m just not a fan of polyester or acetate, nor nylon or spandex. Then of course there comes along a fabric so fun or downright special that I have to break my own rules… like flocked velvet spider webs on black taffeta! It may not be silk, but this fabric was too great to pass up!

The pattern for a circle skirt is so simple to cut and sew together it’s no wonder the style remains popular among vintage reproduction sewers. The hardest part is the zipper, but then again perhaps zippers and I just don’t get along and other seamstresses don’t fear them the same way I do! The hems on these skirts sure do take ages to finish if you are doing them by hand though.I usually finish circle skirt hems with bias tape sewn on by machine then ironed under and stitched down by hand. It takes two and a half packages of pre-made bias tape to do such a hem, but it is so worth it in the end! No hassle, just time consuming!

 

 

 

 

 

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The skirt has a lot of natural body to it as the taffeta is quite stiff on its own, but of course I still wore it over a petticoat too for maximum flair. Another way to get this kind of body in a circle skirt with a less stiff fabric is to use horsehair braid in the hem, but I didn’t have to bother for this skirt. I have been putting twill tape in all of my waistbands though so they don’t stretch out on me after the first wearing. There is nothing more annoying than having a waistband suddenly grow a few inches out of nowhere as it isn’t a fun repair to make!

For more photos of this outfit visit me over on The Closet Historian. Happy Halloween everyone!

 

 

 

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Une jupe plissée

Hello again :-) Some time ago I started sewing a skirt with an interesting pleat arrangement. The pattern is vintage Simplicity 2813 from 1958. I found it on Ebay and it came to me from the beautiful France.

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I love it so much I’m going to use it again and again; currently I’m thinking of navy silk shantung/dupioni or faille for the 2nd version. But back to my number 3, already sewn using black wool blend:

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As with most of the vintage skirt patterns, once I’ve chosen the size the fit was perfect – so I made none alterations at all. Even the lenght was spot on.The construction of the skirt is straightforward; it has side seams and center back seam as well as eight darts, which are the main reason for a good fit between waist and hips.

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The bottom part is separate, to be completed on its own and sewn to the main skirt pieces after they had been constructed as well.  On the top of the junction there is an ornamental strip of fabric, finished off with a bow.To get the bottom part to stand away from the skirt and accentuate the flare, I made the upper skirt-lower skirt junction as a kind of buttressed seam. That proved to be a quick solution which worked perfectly. The zipper is a lapped one, sewn by hand with prick stitches.

I invite you to my blog, rvdzik.blogspot.com, for more details. Thank you for reading!