Vintage Sewing

1964 Winter Sheath Dress

By on May 18, 2018

This dress was made by me earlier this year, when temperatures were below freezing!  The outside of the dress is a cozy, lofty, nubby wool blend bouclé, and the inside is fully lined in a soft 100% cotton (in a sweet pink color) for softness against my skin.  With this fabric combo, my dress is as warm as being wrapped in a blanket but it looks so stylish for being such a simple design.

I really think my pattern, Butterick 3296 from 1964, must have been designed with Audrey Hepburn from the movie “Charades” in mind because the dress and pillbox hat is just her style.  This gave me an excuse to wear a vintage 60’s hat from my collection, as well as vintage 60’s jewelry from my Grandmother!

To see and read more about this sewing project, please visit my blog’s page for it here!

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1950s | Blouses | Pattern Drafting | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

My new spring outfit

By on May 7, 2018

Hello everyone,

since it is so quiet here, I decided to write a short post about my new favourite outfit for spring. The whole look started with the idea of an green outfit inspired by Karlotta Pink’s latest fabric collection. The colour of the print is quite difficult to describe, but it was very important for me that the colour of the skirt would make the colour of the blouse shine.

The pattern of the blouse is self-constructed, because I had fallen in love with a no longer available Simplicity Schnitt 1624. A very similar pattern was reissued by Simplicity, but due to my last experience I became a bit cautious with regard to fit. It should be a figure-hugging blouse and not a nightgown.

The Blouse

For this reason I set about reconstructing the pattern myself. That sounds a lot more awesome than it was. Since I prefer to adapt existing models out of pure laziness rather than develop a pattern myself, I am not particularly experienced at it. The drafting was quite easy and there were only little to adjust – for more information on drafting the blouse check out my blogpost here.

The Fabric Desaster

I wanted to use a lime green satin for the skirt, because it is always available at my regular fabric shop. They didn’t have the fabric at the time, but it was supposed to arrive soon. No luck. (They still don’t have it.) Then I went on a fabric shopping trip to Zurich and I was sure I’d find something. But: Nothing.

A little annoyed and under time pressure, due to to a sewing blogger meeting, I ordered 5 different green fabrics. I didn’t want “okay”, I wanted perfect (at that time I was really obsessed with the right material for the skirt). And in the package were even three possible fabrics. I then decided for the most harmonious combination with the kiwi green cotton-linen blend.

Grünes Set 5

 

In the end everything did go as planned. The blouse was a fast sew and the skirt did go together easy too.

If you wish to see more pictures and read the whole background story (there were more drama than mentioned in the text), you can hop over to our blog PeterSilie&Co or directly to the longer blogpost.

Till next time,

Sabine

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Vintage Sewing

Butterick “New Deltor” 1919

By on February 18, 2018

Hi! This is my first post, but I’ve spent much time pouring through all your fantastic projects!  My name is Erika and I live in Chicago.

I bought this vintage pattern a few months ago and dusted off my aunt’s sewing machine.. I wish I could say, it came together easily, but it was more like three months of grueling effort.

But now that its done I might throw out all my other clothes. I love it.

I also loved working from the true original, crumbling pattern.  And making the muslin copy with tailor’s tacs.. The typography is even amazing.

 

Thanks for looking.

May all your seams be french xo

Erika

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1940s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

1940s Vogue 8811 (For the hot Australian summer)

By on January 27, 2018


This is my second Vogue 8811. Made from a beautiful navy blue based Japanese cotton lawn.

Western Sydney has had weeks of over 40ºC and this dress is perfect. High jewel neckline and kimono sleeves to protect from the sun, and a lovely tea length to stop behind-the-knee sunburn.

The only seriously mod was to omit the sleeve facings, I did a narrow hem instead.

Swing by my blog to for more details and images!

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1970s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

Winter Sewing (McCalls 4968)

By on January 9, 2018

 

I just finished sewing a winter wool jumper dress from 1970s-era McCall’s 4968.  I’m very happy with it: it is comfortable, unusual, and very warm.  My Grandpa and Grandma both made admiring comments about it when I wore it for the first time last Sunday.  The thrifted worsted wool was easy to work with so long as I was careful to press it well, grade all the seams, and edge-stitch all the darts, seams, and edges on the right side to keep them flat and crisp.

Please come visit the sewing blog that I share with my husband for more details and other recent vintage sewing projects: Mr and Mrs Rat.

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1930s | Coats | Vintage Sewing

By on December 19, 2017

1930s winter coat

One thing I’ve wanted to make for a couple of years now is a 1930s warm winter coat. In the past I never quite had the right coat to go with my 1930s clothing and this year I was on a mission to resolve that problem. After purchasing a beautiful original 1930s halo hat in dark teal felt wool, I knew this was the colour my coat had to be. It was neutral enough to go with most things, but wasn’t the same old black, grey or navy that most coats seem to be in.

1930s coat top stitching detail

I set on a mission to find the perfect matching shade of dark teal in a heavy wool fabric and after several months I finally stumbled across a gorgeous one from Dragonfly Fabrics. It has an amazing diagonal textured design to it, which creates a lovely interest to the fabric.

The pattern I used was a self-draft pattern from an original 1930s tailoring booklet, which allowed me to create one exactly to my size in an authentic 1930s design. I did make an adjustment to the front curved seam though, as the original line didn’t really suit me across the chest. This was simple enough to do and I actually think the final seam looks much better.

I also decided to make the top line of the cuff curve with the front seam of the coat to make it look like the line was carrying on. Thankfully this worked spot on when I sewed it all up, something I wasn’t entirely convinced would happen!

1930s coat - back

You can read so much more about this coat and how I made it by heading to my blog. You’ll also find loads of photos, including ones of the incredible Autumn inspired lining and all of the matching garments that create the entire ensemble.

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1930s | Blouses | Coats | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

December Red – a 1930’s Red Wool Ensemble

By on December 17, 2017

This outfit all began the fabric. The print (Asian Art Deco?) from this quilting cotton was irresistible and there was just enough of it (left to purchase) to scrape out a blouse. It seemed so suited for something 1930’s, but is a quilting cotton, so not terribly drapey. I already had a very long length of wool crepe that coordinated, so I knew I could make something to go with the finished piece.

I went in  search for the perfect 1930’s blouse pattern, to start, which proved to be a little easier said than done, as I had trouble finding a blouse pattern that suited the fabric. I did settle on a gorgeous 1930’s dress pattern with a fabulous neck bow, that could be converted into a blouse and skirt. Next up, I searched for a coat pattern and ended up finding all my patterns in the same place. Yay!

The Dress Pattern (above) that I chose to adapt to a blouse and skirt, appealed to me, at first, because of the bow, but also because of the angled shaping of the front opening and V-shape at the center front on the skirt. Because of the minimal length of fabric, I knew the fuller sleeve was not an option.  The short puff sleeve seemed more flattering as well, so I did end up using it in the end.

The Coat pattern was an easy choice.  I love that it had some flair to both the sleeves and the bottom edge.  It seemed a very easy and less formal design that would pair nicely with the finished skirt and blouse.

Each piece turned out very well and I’m excited to wear them all to a Caroling party next weekend.  The Red is VERY festive, don’t you think?

If you would like to see more of how I adapted the dress pattern into a skirt and blouse, some great sewing techniques for the coat and all my resources for the entire ensemble, please visit my blog.

Until next time, Happy Sewing!

xo

Jennifer

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