Skirts

Hoffman Construction Co

Felix and Val's

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I picked up this old wool club jacket at an estate sale a few months ago.  The back embroidery was fabulous even though the coat was moth-eaten and very worn.

McCalls 4161

I used McCalls 4161 coat pattern from the 1940s as a starting point to sew up a jacket that actually fit me.  I cut as much as I could from the original navy wool and added a brown plaid to compliment (and of course I needed a matching skirt).

Finally some Spring sunshine in Wisconsin!

pockets mimick the shoulder lapels

elbow patches were my hubby's idea

I love sewing with wool and plaids are definitely my favorite!  Working with this heavy club jacket was a bit tricky though.  The navy wool is so thick and dense, it was tough to bend and roll the seams.  My finishing work on the inside isn’t as pretty as I’d like it to be because I couldn’t roll the salvage edges under.  It was just too bulky.  I also gave up on hand-stitching the cuffs and bottom waistband.  Again, too bulky.  So instead I did some extra top-stitching to really nail the wool flat where several layers met.  More photos and sewing details are on my blog.  And just in case you’re wondering, the construction behind me is a new ram barn.   The old barn had holes in the roof and cracks in the walls.   Seemed an appropriate place to take pics given Felix and Val’s profession.

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It’s been a while since we last spoke. Truth is, I haven’t been doing a lot of sewing. Who knew that moving house would be such a time consuming task? Not me. That’s for sure. After my routine is broken, I have a hard time getting myself back into rhythm, and the things I was in the habit of doing become difficult to find motivation to do. After a few months of slacking, I couldn’t handle any more daydreaming about sewing. I needed to start. I dug out the most basic project I could think to sew. Simplicity 9267 from 1971 is a basic skirt pattern with timeless, classic design.

I used our extended winter as an opportunity to play with my favorite textile, wool. A skirt pattern like Simplicity 9267 is a fantastic canvas for improvisation. I wanted my skirt to be a basic wardrobe piece with a little bit of interest. I added faux leather trim to the pattern pieces using a zig-zag stitch and created a chevron design over the hips.  I wrote a bit more explanation and posted some additional photos on my blog.
This project was exactly what I needed to get back into the swing of things. I’m thrilled to be sewing again and setting my sights on spring. I’ll see you again soon!

XOXO,

Michelle

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The second skirt in my Pendleton quartet is another plaid number. This one is fairly plain as well, with some simple alterations made to change the look up a bit. I widened the waistband and added suspenders. I’ve always really liked the look of the suspender skirt (whether from the 1910s or the 1950s or anywhere in between), and have intended to make myself one for a long time now. I thought it would be a nice silhouette with this plaid also, simple enough to showcase the pattern, but not so overly simplified as to be boring. This piece of wool had just a few moth holes that needed repair, so I set myself to work at re-weaving again. This is a much finer weave than the previous fabric, so it required a little more precision, but it really wasn’t too bad. I have to admit, I think I’m actually getting a little hooked on it. It’s just the kind of insanely meticulous work I find fun and relaxing (’cause maybe I’m a little nuts).

 

After pulling threads from a scrap of the plaid, I set to work reweaving the two holes in the skirt front, and then the two in the suspender pieces.

 

Doing this made me feel a little bit like the woman who made Chanel’s braided trim for decades (although not old, French, and incredibly skilled).

 

You can see the first hole mid-repair just to the right of the pin.

The skirt turned out pretty well, and I had just enough left of the fabric to make a matching hat (because every outfit should have a matching hat, right?). Anyway, I used the Wearing History Sporty Toppers pattern, view 1. I was working with scraps, so the plaid doesn’t match perfectly on top, but it doesn’t bother me too much since there is so much seaming to break it up in the first place. I used a slightly narrower ribbon than called for in the pattern, but I like how it looks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To complete my sort of “golf-course” couture look, I managed to finally finish one of my biggest UFOs; this brown wool suit jacket. I started this suit about three years ago, finished the skirt, got about half way through the jacket and then put it on the back burner and left it there to stew. It feels really good to finally have it finished and out of the project pile. It’s far from perfect, but finished it all I was really aiming for at this point, so I’m happy with it. I don’t have all the pattern details in front of me, but I’ll try and dig them up. I’m pretty sure it’s a McCall’s pattern, and it’s from the 50s, but I’m not sure the exact year and can’t remember the number. Anyway, here’s the ensemble all put together and ready for a stroll across the fairway. (Both pieces need a little touch up with the iron).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, that’s that. Now on to other projects in the queue. I’ve still got two of the wool skirts to put together, and then numerous other summery projects to start, but I’ve got an Edwardian event to go to in early May that I also have to make some stuff for, and that will probably take precedence. Hope everyone has had a good week!

 

-Evie

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Blue and Green

by Starspangledheart on February 19, 2014 · 4 comments

in 1940s,Skirts

I’ve been sewing and knitting again and have added two new basics to my wardrobe.

The skirt is made from green twill and McCall’s 7032.

The sweater vest is a sports vest made from a 40s pattern in A Stitch in Time Vol. 2. It was quite fun to knit up.

I also opted to wear a new vintage hat with this outfit! I just adore hats even if I’m not much into millinery.

Who else here enjoys vintage knitting along with vintage sewing?

More details on the blog: http://star-spangledheart.blogspot.com/2014/02/back-to-basics.html

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