1950s | Blouses | Shirts

Simplicity 2522

By on May 11, 2014

I chose this pattern to enter the garment on the PatternReview “Vintage” challenge.  It’s a 1958 pattern for blouses with bateau necklines.  I actually love the look of the blouse, but it has some fit issues that weren’t obvious with the muslin and I really wish I had caught before I cut the fashion fabric.  That said, I am smitten with the little bows on the trim and I did get compliments on the blouse when I wore it today.  For more blurb, please visit my blog.

 

 

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1950s | Pattern Drafting | Shirts | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

Vintage Ensemble

By on April 29, 2014

After discovering a bit about Ulyana Sergeenko and her designs, I decided I wanted to do my own take on one of her outfits, and this is my first result!

For the top, I used a pattern envelope from the 1950s as inspiration, Simplicity 4538. I didn’t have the actual pattern, but it looked easy enough to sew the two ends together. The other seam is across the back to form the yoke, but it stops so you have room for the arms. It was easy enough and it took me about 10-20 minutes to figure everything out.

As for the skirt, I drafted my own circle skirt from 2 yards of fabric. I put in a pocket on one side and a zipper on the other.

I have more details here on my blog.

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1940s | 1950s | Children | Kids | Shirts | Vintage Sewing

Easter Sewing for Boys And a Sew for Victory Entry

By on April 16, 2014

These are some matching Easter shirts I made for my boys. Both are made from vintage 40s/50s patterns and will work for my Sew For Victory entries. (I’m hoping to sew up some more 40s patterns before the April 30th deadline.)

They were so easy to sew up and I already have plans for a few more shirts for them.

See more on my blog.

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1970s | 1980s | Children | Mens | Shirts | Vintage Sewing

Two (yes 2!) Vintage Western Shirts for a friend & his little boy

By on April 2, 2014

McCall’s 7456 & Simplicity 6693, from the 1980s & 1970s, have been getting lots of use at my place…ever since I saw the guitar gods in Cracker, both wearing Western shirts at a concert & thinking, “Hey, the Roommate should be able to dress like a guitar god, even if he doesn’t play guitar!”  A request from a friend for a similar shirt, led to me making 2 shirts, because I couldn’t resist doing one for his little boy, too.  The yoke/cuff/placket contrast for both is from some fabric I got on our trip to West Africa, so it’s authentic wax print.  I’m running out of that, though, so used some regular cotton for the main part of the boy’s shirt, and some Marimekko from Crate & Barrel Outlet for the main part of the men’s shirt.  Find out more on my blog, Bella Industries, Inc. 

 

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1960s | Mad Men Inspired | Shirts

Butterick 2475: 60s Pussybow Blouse

By on March 1, 2014

here we are and finished in all it’s splendour is my blummin gorgeous 60s blouse a la Joan Harris (nee Holloway).

Joaniegreen

Having never made a blouse before I wasn’t entirely sure what material to go for. I decided on a trusty poly-cotton which meant the drape would be a bit stiffer than the one shown in the picture but I did want the collar to be a little stiffer, and as I wasn’t sure how this would all play out I thought not splashing the cash on fancy fabric would be the best option.

I went about cutting the pattern, fabric and interfacing out and I was quite happily thinking “less pieces, less work than a dress”. Ah, the young sewing fool inside me.

At the end of the first day I’d made the bodice and the collar. It dawned on my when I finished that I’d absolutely breezed the collar this time, I think I’ve been so caught up in worrying about the set in sleeves that I appear to have somehow mastered collars without thinking about it. Pretty good eh?!

Butterick 2475

Now, I made a little list of goals at the beginning of the year (some have totally fallen by the wayside already) and one of these was to master set in sleeves by the end of 2014. So when I went into this part of making the blouse I did so with a new determination that I would not simply settle for “that’ll do” and I would set these sleeves in over and over until I got them perfect.

Plenty of people gave me advice (thank you everyone for all of your helpful tips and guidance) but I really owe massive thanks to Clare at www.sewdixielou.com for spurring me on when I was halfway through ripping the sleeves out for the second time (and on the verge of having a little cry) who simply said “I never use gathered way hate it. I do it by hand gently easing larger fabric pinning every 1/2″. Then when happy pin in between pins then baste by hand. Remove pins check how it looks then machine”.

Now, this may strike you as odd (but probably goes a long way to explaining more than bit about me) but I never considered for a moment that I should use any other method than gathering.

It’s what everyone had shown me; books, sewing tutorials online, pattern instructions. All gathering. It’s a rule right?

Wrong. I am learning more and more that sewing is about finding what works for you and just because people say you should do it this way, it doesn’t mean you have to do it this way.

In the end I went for a bit of both, I gathered a little and then pinned and pinned. I sewed from the inside of the sleeve ; calmly, slowly, gently and smoothed as I went. Et Voilà! A perfectly set in sleeve!

Butterick 2475

So overjoyed was I that I ran about the house and told Tim he should come and look, at which point he did and we embraced and then I did my little happy dance (literally). Then I proceeded to set the other in, with no problem at all and then made Tim come back every five minutes to look at my beautiful set in sleeves on my fantastic blouse.

Needless to say, it wore a bit thin (for him- certainly not for me) after the 50th time, saying that though he was very chuffed for me.

Next up were buttonholes and buttons, which I forgot to buy.  I finally located some small-ish ones and add them to the cuffs and the front of the blouse with a pop stud opening at the top (which is covered when the collar is done up) and here we are, the finished article.

Butterick 2475

Butterick 2475

Butterick 2475

Butterick 2475

Butterick 2475

I have refrained from modelling this as I really want to get the skirt made in March so that I can wear both together, just like Joanie.

I really feel like I’ve made sewing skills progress with this blouse.

If you’d like to read more or check out other things I’ve made, please visit my blog www.staceystitch.com 

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1930s | 1940s | Blouses | Shirts | Vintage Sewing

A modified take on the Wearing History smooth sailing blouse!

By on February 10, 2014

Hello everyone!

I am back with my latest make, a blouse made from the 1930s  Smooth Sailing pattern from Wearing History. I had the perfect Spitfire fabric and wanted to make a RAF blouse with a slight touch of ‘uniform’. I altered the giant puffed sleeves  into shoulder pleats, and added tabs to the shoulder. I think it looks a bit more ‘masculine’, but very smart 😉

 

I really can’t recommend this pattern enough, it is a lovely wearable style, and easy to tweak into whatever you like.

This is my second take, and I suspect more in the future. If you’d like to see more pictures and read more about the blouse and fabric, please hop on over to my place! Thanks for looking 😉

 

 

 

 

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1950s | Mens | Shirts | Vintage Sewing

Plaid for Christmas

By on January 4, 2014

I’ve been busy the last couple months with sewing that wasn’t vintage.  There were a couple of zombie events where I needed to make a Pride and Prejudice costume and a steampunk-ish costume.  Then I needed to make three Santa themed costumes.

I digress, this post isn’t about those projects.

A bit of back story – my husband spends pretty much 99% of his days in shorts, tank top and button down shirts.  EVEN WHEN IT SNOWS.  It use to be T-shirts, but as he’s the owner of his own tech company, I finally talked him into wearing shirts with buttons.

Quite a few months ago I posted about a box of retro patterns I was gifted by a friend and her family.  It was filled with patterns from the 50s-70s for men, women and kids.  This project is a button down shirt from that box of patterns.

Simplicity 5029 - View 3

I showed the hubby a couple of different patterns and he chose the pattern above, view 3 (short sleeves).

The hubby is a big fan of orange and plaid and I managed to find plaid shirting for $4/m.  I pre-washed and matched the stripes before cutting.  I know a lot of people find matching plaid intimidating, but a shirt project is a good place to start.  You don’t necessarily need to match every seam – it’s up to you.

I decide to cut the front pocket, the collar and back yoke on the bias to give the shirt some visual interest.  This patterns had the ease in the back dealt with slight gathering instead of pleats.  For a casual shirt, I think this is a great idea, but would still use pleats if I was making the dress shirts.

Back yoke.

 

Close up of front details.

One of the little details this shirt has that I love is the notched sleeve.  Simple detail, but a really nice touch.

Notched sleeve detail.
My hubby LOVES his new shirt, but he’s too shy to model it for us, so you’ll have to use your imagination.  My petite mannequin doesn’t quite fill out this shirt adequately enough to stand in for my 6’2″, 195lb hubby, but she’ll have to do.
The finished shirt on my female mannequin.
Until next time – keep your machines purring along!
xo girliefrank

 

 

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