Dress Forms

Simplicity 7072 front

 

For my sister’s birthday, I decided to make her a dress. Since she’s tiny, I jumped at the chance to bust out some of my smaller sized patterns (I covet size 18′s for myself) with a mod 1960′s silhouette. We decided on Simplicity 7072, which is a simple A line shift with French darts and a round neckline. Interestingly, my sister has an amazing vintage shift from the late 1960′s in an almost identical style. The fabric is even similar, although I used a quilting cotton, and the original is in a weird heavy woven. It’s almost like a lightweight upholstery fabric, but with a soft handfeel. Also, once I got the original on the dress form, I noticed that the pattern design is not centered. It was obviously hand made by a pretty good seamstress. While the pattern fit pretty well as drafted, I still had to do some pattern adjustments. These included taking it in a half inch all the way around, lowering the neckline a bit, and moving the shoulder in a bit. I omitted the facings and made a coordinating bias tape in espresso bean brown to finish the edge, which I did with an invisible stitch. I think it turned out really well. I hope it fits her! I barely got it to fit on my dress form. You can see the shadow on the skirt where I had to stretch it over the form. What would the world be without adjustable dress forms! Enjoy!

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This is not a new project but I’m planning on making a new one for decoration so I’m trying to recall what I learned from the last one.

I bought this Edwardian dummy pattern at Atelier Sylphe Corsets. The pattern is very precise and comes together without tweaking. For me, the instructions were enough but I wont recommend this for a beginner. The fabric is thick cotton twill, upholstery fabrics probably works the best. I recommend lining the neck, arm and bottom plates with cardboard for a clean look. I filled my dummy with polyester filling which worked OK but the material is to lightweight and it took ridiculous amounts of filling to get an even shape. There is a reason people used straw or sawdust originally. Next time Ill try something else. Over all this is a nice looking, unusual pattern.

Here it is again with a corset on. My first try on an Edwardian S-shape from a free pattern. The pattern was published in various home sewing books the years around 1910. This is a quickly made, single layer corset with only six bones on each side so its not very supportive but works well for testing the fit. The Corset is made for me so its a bit big for the dummy.

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my new baby!

by SundayDriveDesigns on September 9, 2012 · 6 comments

in Dress Forms

I have been looking for a dress form for awhile now.  The big problem, my budget.  Then this week I thought I would check craigslist, just for the heck of it.  And I found one!

And it adjusts to my size (ok I may have to add some padding to the middle bits)!  It’s hard pink plastic, that needs a bit of a wash with some white vinegar as it still has that “farm fresh” smell.  But other than that, it’s perfect!  Now all she needs is a name.  So I’m hoping to enlist some help from other WeSewRetro’ers.  Check out my blog for more details.

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