1940s | 1950s | 1970s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

A pattern mash up, 50 plus 70s equals 40s

By on November 20, 2016

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Perhaps the pièce de résistance that a woman might have in the 50s, that rather special pattern in the stash of work and household clothes. Advance 6190 was a delight to work with! And I am so pleased with the results.

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I was very short on fabric for this project, but the fabric, a wool blend crepe, given to me by a friend, was perfect, so perfect, I had to use it, so I teamed the 50s bodice up with a simple skirt from a 70s pattern, and voila!

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I now have a very 40s looking dress, win!

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I have more photos and making details over on my blog.

I hope your sewing projects are going well as we approach the end of the year.

Happy sewing, Angela x

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1960s | Dresses | Modern Patterns

Tutorial: How to Sew Heart Pockets – Sweeten up Any Make! Ft. Tilly and the Buttons Coco Dress

By on November 6, 2016

Hi everyone!

Welcome to my first sewing tutorial! I love sewing with jersey and as I’m trying to sew some more everyday items and cosy Autumn pieces, it’s time to get creative with it! I recently picked up this beautiful ponte roma jersey with another 60s style Coco dress in mind and I think this classic black and white stripe is dying for a red colour pop. In the form of a cute heart pocket of course!…

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For my full heart pocket tutorial & images, check out my blog The Crafty Pinup.

Thank you!
xo

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1950s | Dresses | Kids

Vintage for Halloween and Everyday

By on November 1, 2016

I just love when I get to do a Halloween costume that will be worn as an everyday outfit as well. Because who really wants to put a ton of work into a dress that will only be worn once. I was beyond thrilled when I asked my 2 year old daughter what she wanted to be for Halloween this year and she responded with an enthusiastic, Lucy!! Followed by her favorite quote, “do you poop out at parties?”.

Her dress was created by altering a pattern I already had on hand (The Dainty Darling dress) in one of my favorite sewing books, “Sew Classic Clothes for Girls” by Lindsay Wilkes.

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My dress was created using Butterick’s B6018.

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I have to admit, I am so beyond pleased with this pattern. I think I am going to have to sew it up again in view b.

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But the best part of our costumes, is the fact that only the aprons were the costume-y bits and we can wear our dresses out again for a wonderfully vintage mommy and me look!

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You can read more about my make at my blog, Seams Sew Retro.

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1950s | Dresses

Vintage Butterick 8038- Flamingo Version!

By on October 18, 2016

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I was such a huge fan of my first version of vintage Butterick 8038 that I knew another version was the perfect excuse to buy this fabric!

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I know I must really love this pattern if it meant that the fabric successfully avoided a, ahem, maturing period in the stash… 😉 I made the dress just as called for on the pattern and it quickly became my ultimate favorite summer dress! The fabric came from Hobby Lobby (they’ve had such great prints this year!).

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Stop by my blog for some more details and photos- Mode de Lis

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1930s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

Red Linen Wrap Dress

By on September 3, 2016

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Seeing as vintage can sometimes seem a little bit prim and higher maintenance, it can feel great to just toss on a wrap dress and be extra comfy. No petticoats or under structure, just a linen rayon blend and an adjustable waist tie!

I’ve made a 1930’s inspired wrap dress before, and I used the same pattern once again, a self drafted number cobbled together from my usual kimono sleeved dress bodice pattern and an A-line skirt pattern. I did change the sleeve shape just a bit to be a bit more square and actually kimono like, as I knew I wanted to take photos of the finished dress in a Japanese garden. The red linen/rayon blend is from Joanns, and they carry this same fabric in several colors in their linen section. I like the addition of rayon, it means the fabric wrinkles a bit less ferociously than a linen would on its own. This fabric also has a nice weight to it and holds a crisp edge well when ironed.

Here is a 1930s pattern image that shows a similar dress, though I think these 30’s numbers are meant to be more casual house dresses and I made mine more formal for wearing out and about.

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The most tedious thing about making this dress was making, ironing, and stitching on the self fabric bias binding along the edges. The dress is unlined, and has no facings, so the bias binding encloses all of the raw edges including the hem. I sewed the bias along the outer edge by machine (that was a lot of pins!) and then after folding it over to the backside stitched the entire length down with invisible hand stitches on the back. Time consuming indeed, but worth it in the end for a nice finish!

 

 

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I am so pleased with how the dress came together in the end and I already want to make another version in the black colorway of this same fabric! Perhaps that will be a project for next year 🙂 For more photos of this dress and my day at the Denver Botanical Gardens visit me over on The Closet Historian!

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