Children

bodice of child's dress

 

This is the bodice of the dress that I have made for my three year old god-daughter.  In real life the dress is finished apart from a tiny bit of hand stitching to neaten off a few details on the inside.  However in blogland it is still a work in progress because I have been showing the construction step by step to demonstrate the dressmaking techniques I use. Because I only use straight stitch machines – hand machines and treadles – zigzagging and overlocking is a mystery to me.  I didn’t know what an overlocker looked like until I watched the Great British Sewing Bee recently, and I had been reading American blogs for ages before I worked out that sergers were what we call overlockers.

bound armhole seam

Today I have put a post on my blog, lavishly illustrated with 18 photos, showing how I do bound armhole seams.  Previous posts include photos of how I have drafted the pattern piece for the collar and done the felled seams.

 

I hope my posts are helpful to keen retro fans.  There is still a way to go before I have posted all the stages of construction.

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I sewed up an Easter dress of my daughter’s choosing from 1940s Simplicity 1573 pattern for girls in size 6. I modified it slightly, but it’s mostly true to the pattern. It’s also another projects for Sew for Victory 2.0, and I’m hoping I’ll have more projects completed before the deadline.

While the fabric pattern is completely modern, the idea is definitely vintage and 1940s.

Read and see more about it on my blog.

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These are some matching Easter shirts I made for my boys. Both are made from vintage 40s/50s patterns and will work for my Sew For Victory entries. (I’m hoping to sew up some more 40s patterns before the April 30th deadline.)

They were so easy to sew up and I already have plans for a few more shirts for them.

See more on my blog.

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McCall’s 7456 & Simplicity 6693, from the 1980s & 1970s, have been getting lots of use at my place…ever since I saw the guitar gods in Cracker, both wearing Western shirts at a concert & thinking, “Hey, the Roommate should be able to dress like a guitar god, even if he doesn’t play guitar!”  A request from a friend for a similar shirt, led to me making 2 shirts, because I couldn’t resist doing one for his little boy, too.  The yoke/cuff/placket contrast for both is from some fabric I got on our trip to West Africa, so it’s authentic wax print.  I’m running out of that, though, so used some regular cotton for the main part of the boy’s shirt, and some Marimekko from Crate & Barrel Outlet for the main part of the men’s shirt.  Find out more on my blog, Bella Industries, Inc. 

 

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