Buttons

 

I have had this pattern, which is Simplicity 1944 from 1947, in my collection for a while. My cousin just had a baby girl, so I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to make up this cute little sun suit. The pattern is a size 3, so it will be awhile before she grows into it, but it was so darn cute I had to give it a  whirl. I used plaid lightweight cotton, and went with a rickrack trim in fuchsia. There is a fuchsia stripe in the fabric, but it is not showing up well on camera. This is View 1, which has self made ruffles. View 2 uses purchased trim. I also contemplated using elastic in the legs, but in the end I went with the self made bias tape that is called for in the pattern. I did some quick and dirty hand bound buttonholes, which look less than great but do the job. Definitely more practice needed in that department. Unfortunately, the brim pattern piece for the matching bonnet was missing. I contemplated drafting a new one, but decided against it because I already have a giant pile of stuff in my sewing stash I need to get to, so I kept in simple with just the sun suit. Enjoy!

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I love gingham! It’s such a classic look. So when I wanted to make a simple summer dress just right for those hottest of summer days, I chose a black and white gingham cotton.

Fabric: black and white gingham cotton ($4/yd)
Pattern: Simplicity 2502
Year: 1948
Notions: buttons (from stash)
Hours to complete: 6-ish
First worn: May 2012
Total cost: ~$12

I had some fun with the seam finishes and special vintage construction details.

Black and white striped bias tape!

Sneaky hidden buttons in the fly front!

There are more photos and construction details over on the blog.

Also, I’m destashing some plus sized vintage patterns c. 1950s-1970s. If any of you would be interested in giving them a new home, check out all of the details here.

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As a three-time cancer survivor, my mom has had more than her share of challenges.  This year, I’m especially happy to give her a pair of hand-made pajamas – her favorite garment – for Mothers’ Day.  Since she grew up in the 1950′s, this terrific vintage pattern was the perfect find:

1950's Pajama Pattern - Simplicity 1325

I chose View 3, with shorts, because she lives in the South.  Instead of the two hip pockets though, I did just the single upper pocket from View 1.  Here’s the result:

Pajama top

The fabric is a crisp cotton in yellow (her favorite color) with ribbons and pale pink roses.  I trimmed the sleeves and pocket with lace.  I love the boxy shape of the top.  The bottoms have a cute front pleat, which truly gives them 1950′s flair!

Pleat detail on pajama shorts

 

Pajama shorts

I accomplished a few sewing ‘firsts’ with this project:  first collar, first set-in sleeves and first project finished with my new machine ( a Husqvarna Emerald 116, which I’m absolutely loving!).  This machine makes near-perfect button holes, automatically:

Woohoo, a buttonhole!

And here is perhaps my favorite detail, the pink vintage buttons:

Pretty buttons

Altogether, a fun and worthy project.  I know my mom will love them!  And I’m looking forward to making a few more pair, for summer and winter.

Has anyone else made vintage pajamas or lingerie?  I’d love to hear your advice.  Thanks for reading!

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I was at Hawthorne Vintage when I found the blue plaid Pendleton I used for my Peony as well as this more manly 1970′s beige plaid wool. I decided it was high time I created something more inticate (well, not necessarily more intricate, but tailored in a way that I was less accustomed to) and I purchased the Colette Patterns Negroni shirt.

I was also gearing up to make my Sew For Victory dress, which has a button-up bodice. I was nervous to try a shirtwaist dress for the first time using a vintage pattern. As always, the instructions in my Colette Pattern Booklet lead me through this Negroni project with ease and when it came time to make my Doris Dress, it was a breeze! I <3 colette.

Having only just 3 yards of fabric I went ahead and cut it out in size small. As it turns out, small men’s Pendleton shirts are in high demand in PDX. I found a friend who was interested in buying this shirt, even though I didn’t have enough fabric to make full-length sleeves. Yes, it is a bit awkward to have a heavy wool shirt with short sleeves, but as my mother said, “Men usually end up rolling the sleeves up anyway.” I think I did a good job of making due with what I had and gave life back to this bit of old wool, don’t you?

 

For more pictures and construction details, visit my blog. Thanks!

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