Aprons

I named this past year’s Christmas dresses after the Johnny Cash song because they’re frankenpatterned from three vintage patterns each.  The collar and cuffs are done with Victorian fagoting stitching, the pinafores are thirties for the bigger one and forties for the smaller one, the bodice and skirts and collars are fifties dresses, and the sleeves are late sixties-early seventies.

 

 

The red and white ribbons are bias cut, hand-dyed silk and a sort of a nod to candy canes.  :) I also inserted entredeux into both the bodices and the pinafore skirts and the dresses underneath have beading lace on both the skirts and bodices.  Gracie requested a Christmas dress that wasn’t “itchy” and didn’t have puffed sleeves and had a twirly skirt, so this was my answer.

 

 

Once again, I used CRIN in the hem, and had a crinoline to go underneath to make the skirt nice and full.  I learned that you need to use a size 70 needle because the 80s and 90s can lead to hitting parts of the CRIN and runs in it.

 

 

The pinafore or as Gracie calls it the “fancy apron dress” is made so that with a slip, it can be worn as a separate dress when the weather gets warmer.  It’s hemline is also finished with CRIN.    I made matching bows from silk satin ribbon, which I really don’t recommend because they were so limp!  (Plain old polyester grosgrain has much more body and stiffness!)

 

Grace claimed that she’d rather wear baby sister Nicole’s dress because it was cuter!  (And here I thought I’d gone to great lengths to make them matching dresses!)  I’m afraid I don’t have pictures of the girls wearing them because all of the more affordable portrait studios have moved out of town, so we gave Sears a try and only came out with one portrait, which was a Christmas present to Mommy and Daddy.

 

The fabric is red with gold stars, but aside from the color, it’s a non-Christmas Christmas print.  I’m hoping they’ll get more wear out of them that way.

 

Nikki’s bow is on a headband because she’s rocking the baby mullet right now and doesn’t have enough hair in front to hold a bow yet.  I’m starting to look for vintage boy patterns now, ’cause they’re getting a baby brother, but since I know it’ll be a year to 18 months before he’ll fit into toddler 6 months patterns, I’m just not in a hurry!  More on this project on my blog, Granny Lane Sewing.

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Rosey the Robot Maid did most of the apron wearing in the Jetson family, but I have to think that if Jane needed to wear an apron for show that she’d choose something like this one.

I used Butterick 9578.  This pattern had been on my list for a while, and got bumped to the top thanks to the Did you make that? Apronalong.

 

 

The pockets are really fun – they’re basically a square sewn from two different fabrics, then you fold down the top corner.

There are a few more photos on my blog.  I’m working on the full apron version as well – hopefully I’ll get that wrapped up soon because the apronalong ends tomorrow!

 

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“You’re the talk of the bridge club in these snappy aprons.”

I finally have my sewing groove back! To kick things off here is an apron made from Butterick 6743. According to the Vintage Pattern Wiki, this pattern was sold in 1953. I bought my copy from Etsy last year in factory fold condition. It is hard to imagine how the pattern had not been used until for over 50 years as it’s just too darn cute!

The pattern asks for one yard of fabric and five yards of bias binding. There are four pattern pieces: front section (cut 1), side section (cut 2), waist band (cut 1) and tie ends (cut 2). I selected a medium weight cotton fabric in a retro print that I thought would be perfect as a half apron. To set it off I paired it with a musky pink bias binding. I sewed up View C (original pattern photo at end of post) in only a couple of hours.

 

 

 

“Saucer patterns with novel loop holes.”


The curved edges were finished with bias binding making finishing these seam a breeze. I sewed the waist band to the apron panels using a French seam, and double folded all the tie edges to give a nice neat look and to make the bands slightly sturdier. Here are a few shot of the underside of the apron.

 

 

 

Now I worry it is too cute to use! Can one wear an apron as a fashion accessory?

And finally, here is the original pattern in all its glory…

Please feel free to follow all my sewing activities as my blog Buckingham Road.
Sam xox

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I made this a couple days ago as a birthday present for a little girl in my son’s class and it’s from fabulous 1952. the only things I changed was to bag line the apron instead of using like 7 yards of bias binding and I added a button tab instead of neck ties. The bag lining is much faster to sew and adds that little bit more protection in case she dumps a ton of paint on herself.

I loaded the pockets with art supplies and I think she is just going to love it.

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