1950s | Accessories | Dresses | Mens

Pictures from Prom!

By on May 20, 2014

I promise this is my last post about my prom dress. Here’s the first post and the second post.

We had prom two days ago and I had a blast! I’m so glad with how my dress and overall look came out. I had so many people compliment my dress, both people who knew I made it and people who didn’t! My date, Alex, wore a bowtie that I made for him and I will admit that his bowtie did not look as good as the other bowtie I made for a friend.

This is me and my dorm parent/volleyball coach/directed study advisor. She helped me through all this and supported me the whole way.

 

 

This is me and Alex, quite the power couple, right?

He doesn’t know how to tie a bow tie so I helped.

This is Evan’s bow tie. He wanted a Boston Bruins bow tie and I told him as long as he bought the fabric I would be thrilled to make one for him.

 

This is all the girls on my lacrosse team who went to prom. This is a good full length picture of my dress.

Continue Reading

Accessories | Bags / Purses

Terminology help: What do you call this kind of pocket?

By on April 17, 2014

This is a little thing but it’s been nagging me forever.

What do you call the kind of pocket seen in this Flickr set (Simplicity 4717, 1943).  (This is my set; I made the dress a couple of years ago.)

I’ve gotten in the habit of thinking of them as “Colonial pockets” because they’re similar to the pockets women wore as a separate accessory before pockets installed in clothing became common, but I know that that’s only my lazy term for them and they must have a proper name.  Unfortunately, since I don’t know what that name is, I can’t search for it, and since they’re not a terribly common kind of pocket they’re not coming up on my various “types of pockets” searches.

 

 

Continue Reading

1940s | 1950s | 1960s | Accessories | Buttons

The Retro Cushion – A Tutorial

By on March 25, 2014
I’ve always loved the round retro cushion, but I just couldn’t justify the expense of buying one – cushions are serious investments these days! So, I decided to make one and show you guys just how easy it is to make your own as well!

You can find the full tutorial on my blog. The bulk of the cushion is hand-sewn, so it does take longer to make than your traditional square cushion cover, but the results are simply gorgeous (the centre grid on this cushion took me about 2-3 hours to hand sew one evening). It also gives you a chance to practice your hand sewing and it’s really quite forgiving if you’re a bit rusty.

While the cushion itself looks complicated, I’ve hopefully made the process much easier to understand and once you get the hang of it, it’s a little like knitting with it’s repetitive stitches which makes it great t.v sewing.

 

If you do give one of these a go, please let me know!! I’d love to see them.

xx

J

 

Continue Reading

1970s | Accessories

A very retro leather saddle bag

By on March 12, 2014

VintageSaddleBagHi All!

I wasn’t at all certain this post would be welcome here because this baby is not a garment but an accessory! Anywho here goes, hope you all still find it interesting and inspiring!

This gorgeous retro-inspired bicycle saddle bag was not actually made by me… but by my ridiculously clever husband! I just had to share it with vintage lovers and since this is where I share my vintage makes I thought it would be the place.

I’m so very proud and awed by my vintage bike mad, non-sewing, non-leatherworking hubby who conceived of the idea, created the design from scratch (including drafting the pattern), sourced the leather and hardware, dyed and finished the leather himself, and then sewed it completely by hand. The man’s talents are limitless.

The part I like about it the best? That I could easily see it tweaked to make an amazing 70’s style shoulder bag with long strap… I may have already put an order in! If you’d like to see more feel free to pop over to my blog to check out the deets.

Continue Reading

1940s | Accessories | Hats

An early 40’s beret

By on March 1, 2014

I made this beret as a part of The Historical Sew Fortnightly 2014 and this is the first challenge I have completed. It is a  wool beret in pink/rust tartan and the pattern is The Three Hour Beret, a reproduction pattern from New Vintage Lady, dating from the early 1940’s.  I have wanted to do this beret for some time and as I’m also making a reversible coat with the pink/rust tartan, I thought a matching  beret would look nice with it. The pattern was a little quirky and it was great  fun to sew it. Unfortunately when padded and worn straight it looked absolutely  awful on me. So I removed the padding and tilted it instead and it looked much  better, if not exactly as intended. For another face shape I am sure it will
look smashing as it was intended.

 

Here are a few versions made by New Vintage Lady.

 

 

Continue Reading

1930s | 1950s | Accessories | Hats | Jackets | Skirts

A sporty look, and the second chapter in my wool skirt saga.

By on February 28, 2014

The second skirt in my Pendleton quartet is another plaid number. This one is fairly plain as well, with some simple alterations made to change the look up a bit. I widened the waistband and added suspenders. I’ve always really liked the look of the suspender skirt (whether from the 1910s or the 1950s or anywhere in between), and have intended to make myself one for a long time now. I thought it would be a nice silhouette with this plaid also, simple enough to showcase the pattern, but not so overly simplified as to be boring. This piece of wool had just a few moth holes that needed repair, so I set myself to work at re-weaving again. This is a much finer weave than the previous fabric, so it required a little more precision, but it really wasn’t too bad. I have to admit, I think I’m actually getting a little hooked on it. It’s just the kind of insanely meticulous work I find fun and relaxing (’cause maybe I’m a little nuts).

 

After pulling threads from a scrap of the plaid, I set to work reweaving the two holes in the skirt front, and then the two in the suspender pieces.

 

Doing this made me feel a little bit like the woman who made Chanel’s braided trim for decades (although not old, French, and incredibly skilled).

 

You can see the first hole mid-repair just to the right of the pin.

The skirt turned out pretty well, and I had just enough left of the fabric to make a matching hat (because every outfit should have a matching hat, right?). Anyway, I used the Wearing History Sporty Toppers pattern, view 1. I was working with scraps, so the plaid doesn’t match perfectly on top, but it doesn’t bother me too much since there is so much seaming to break it up in the first place. I used a slightly narrower ribbon than called for in the pattern, but I like how it looks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To complete my sort of “golf-course” couture look, I managed to finally finish one of my biggest UFOs; this brown wool suit jacket. I started this suit about three years ago, finished the skirt, got about half way through the jacket and then put it on the back burner and left it there to stew. It feels really good to finally have it finished and out of the project pile. It’s far from perfect, but finished it all I was really aiming for at this point, so I’m happy with it. I don’t have all the pattern details in front of me, but I’ll try and dig them up. I’m pretty sure it’s a McCall’s pattern, and it’s from the 50s, but I’m not sure the exact year and can’t remember the number. Anyway, here’s the ensemble all put together and ready for a stroll across the fairway. (Both pieces need a little touch up with the iron).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, that’s that. Now on to other projects in the queue. I’ve still got two of the wool skirts to put together, and then numerous other summery projects to start, but I’ve got an Edwardian event to go to in early May that I also have to make some stuff for, and that will probably take precedence. Hope everyone has had a good week!

 

-Evie

Continue Reading