Accessories

I promise this is my last post about my prom dress. Here’s the first post and the second post.

We had prom two days ago and I had a blast! I’m so glad with how my dress and overall look came out. I had so many people compliment my dress, both people who knew I made it and people who didn’t! My date, Alex, wore a bowtie that I made for him and I will admit that his bowtie did not look as good as the other bowtie I made for a friend.

This is me and my dorm parent/volleyball coach/directed study advisor. She helped me through all this and supported me the whole way.

 

 

This is me and Alex, quite the power couple, right?

He doesn’t know how to tie a bow tie so I helped.

This is Evan’s bow tie. He wanted a Boston Bruins bow tie and I told him as long as he bought the fabric I would be thrilled to make one for him.

 

This is all the girls on my lacrosse team who went to prom. This is a good full length picture of my dress.

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Bubblegum pillows with Simplicity 8139 pattern (1977)

 

 

 

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This is a little thing but it’s been nagging me forever.

What do you call the kind of pocket seen in this Flickr set (Simplicity 4717, 1943).  (This is my set; I made the dress a couple of years ago.)

I’ve gotten in the habit of thinking of them as “Colonial pockets” because they’re similar to the pockets women wore as a separate accessory before pockets installed in clothing became common, but I know that that’s only my lazy term for them and they must have a proper name.  Unfortunately, since I don’t know what that name is, I can’t search for it, and since they’re not a terribly common kind of pocket they’re not coming up on my various “types of pockets” searches.

 

 

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I’ve always loved the round retro cushion, but I just couldn’t justify the expense of buying one – cushions are serious investments these days! So, I decided to make one and show you guys just how easy it is to make your own as well!

You can find the full tutorial on my blog. The bulk of the cushion is hand-sewn, so it does take longer to make than your traditional square cushion cover, but the results are simply gorgeous (the centre grid on this cushion took me about 2-3 hours to hand sew one evening). It also gives you a chance to practice your hand sewing and it’s really quite forgiving if you’re a bit rusty.

While the cushion itself looks complicated, I’ve hopefully made the process much easier to understand and once you get the hang of it, it’s a little like knitting with it’s repetitive stitches which makes it great t.v sewing.

 

If you do give one of these a go, please let me know!! I’d love to see them.

xx

J

 

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