1950s | 1960s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

Blackmore So-Easy 9266

By on May 31, 2017

vintage blackmore 9266

The pattern and the fabric were just waiting for each other… and for the the penny to drop, given both have been in stash for quite some time!

I’m not sure of the date, maybe late 50s or 60s? But its definitely a style I’m fond of. And works perfectly with the bark cloth. I just love the tropical print and it was lovely to sew up.

vintage blackmore 9266 sewing pattern

It took 3 toiles to fit and I’m happy with the result but still needs a few small adjustments. Namely the position of the straps and tweaking the bodice a bit more. I had to take in the skirt substantially to get a snug fit. The pattern illustration is a bit misleading as per usual!

vintage blackmore 9266 dress front view

Shame I didn’t have enough fabric for the little jacket but to be honest a little black linen jacket would do just fine.

For more details, hop over to ooobop!

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1950s | 1960s | Dresses

Retro Nautical Inspired Moneta Dress

By on May 4, 2017
Akram's Ideas: The Moneta Dress an Astonishingly Quick Make

I recently took part in the #MonetaParty hosted by the Triple Stitchers made up of Rachel, Abigal, and Elle . The idea was that all participants sew up the Moneta dress by Colette patterns and share their makes on Instagram.

Retro Additions

At first, I wasn’t sure if I wanted to participate after all the Moneta dress is just a simple knit dress.

However, I after exploring Colette patterns website I found a free collar extension pack for this pattern. The collar variations really added to this dress.

Akram's Ideas: The Moneta Dress an Astonishingly Quick Make

 

I was especially taken by the tie collar and how it gave the dress a bit of a retro nautical inspired look.

Along with the tie collar, I also made the largest size skirt and then gathered it. It gave the skirt a much fuller look than the more relaxed fit of the original dress.

Akram's Ideas: The Moneta Dress an Astonishingly Quick Make

The length of the skirt I cut as directed, but I’m short so I feel like it seems longer to me than most of the Moneta’s that I see online.

With that said, the fuller skirt and longer length also help to give this dress more retro appeal.

Simple Make

Akram's Ideas: The Moneta Dress an Astonishingly Quick Make

The Moneta dress is so easy to make and I managed to sew it up in around 4 hours.

While it might be simple, a few additions really give this dress the retro style I love.

For full details about making this dress  be sure to see my full blog post at http://akramsideas.com/moneta-dress/

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1960s

Simonetta Dress Vogue Coat

By on April 14, 2017

I had to go to a wedding last weekend and used it as an excuse to try out these two patterns – Simonetta Dress, and Vogue Coat.

I seem to always buy a-line empire line dress patterns as its a style I think suits me – and I have now decided that the Simonetta dress is the best ever – I think its the wider shoulder (it extends out but no shoulder pads), as it gives a flattering line (for the pear shaped).  The dress for the wedding I made in a gross grain, and I did run up a ‘wearable’ muslin from a curtain scrap (so I now have 2 nice dresses).  The cut of this dress is simple and very effective, the front seam has a curve in it, as do the darts.  The collar was tricky only in that I had never done one like this.  Its basically 2 strips of bias, folded, and steamed into a curved shape.

 

 

The coat is in a cotton.  I had wanted to make a casual summer coat so went with a neutral colour and casual fabric.  I did interline it as the fabric creased like linen (and looks like linen), but did not interline the sleeves (1, because its a summer coat and 2, because I didnt think the bias would hold creases).  I was rather cheap and interlined with light sew-in basting, I don’t interline a lot, but if I was able to locate it (I wasn’t), I would have preferred to have used hankerchief cotton or a voile.

 

The only really technical bit about the coat was the use of ‘pad stitching’ in the collar.  I had never done this before and so referred to the wonderful Allyne Bane book and it was all clear.  I only did a medium amount of pad stitching, and it serves well.  after the pad stitching, I did baste the collar roll line in place and left this stitching in until the final steam.  Even though its a casual coat, I think the sit of the collar is gorgeous – I notice it in the wearing  as it sits away from the neck and it really feels like the coat hangs from the shoulders…..I dont know if I am explaining this correctly, but it feels exactly what is perfect for an evening or summer coat, and I dont think I ever had a coat that sat like this, which is another fabulous reason to sew vintage/sew your own!

 

I do have a blog – upsew.ie  if anyone wants to see other projects, – but I have pretty much replicated the post here!

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1960s

Whiter shade of pale

By on March 24, 2017

Hello!  Some time ago I bought 2 remnant pieces of beautiful grosgrains: an apple green rayon and a creamy-white cotton one. I never worked with grosgrain except for the ribbons and I was surprised to find how delicate, soft and drapey it is. The rayon grosgrain has more body and is a bit firmer; the cotton is light and smooth; both have a wonderful, subtle sheen to them, which catches the light beautifully. The only problem is that they fray like crazy: be sure to leave a considerable seam allowances and to properly secure them if sewing with grosgrain fabrics (I used a dense zig-zag stitch).

 

I used the Simplicity 8049 1960s reproduction pattern. I was attracted to the three-armhole dress idea and I liked the purity of its lines. The construction was pretty straightforward; surprisingly enough, the front is cut on straight grain so the “cowl” is created by using pleats. I decided to line the whole dress; this cleaned up the mess inside and helped to give the dress a little bit more body and less transparency. The lining pieces were created using main pattern pieces, I hand-stitched them in place all around the facings, the side seam and the hem.

The cat always thinks he’s so creative with his hiding spots

I made some personal touches to the project like adding a lining cover to the snaps or making a separate belt, which fastens with 3 hooks-and eyes and a snap. For more details and photos, I invite you to visit my blog, rvdzik.blogspot.com. Have a great weekend!

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1960s | Children | Kids | Vintage Sewing

Simplicity 4836 – A Sentimental Make

By on March 22, 2017

Hey lovelies,

I’ve been reading We Sew Retro for some time now, and I’m excited to join the ranks of you who contribute! I want to share a recent-ish project with you. It isn’t by any means my first retro project, but it is special, and you’ll soon see why 🙂

A few months ago, I was thrifting at a secondhand store out of town. I love scouring thrift stores for their sewing patterns – they’re a goldmine! Anyway, I stumbled on this cute pattern Simplicity 4836. It’s a little boys’ pants, vest and jacket suit pattern from the early 1960s. I originally bought it to put it in my shop, but on closer inspection I noticed something amazing.

Simplicity 4836 – you’ll make one little boy so stylish!
Can you see that? This pattern was used for a little Michael too more than 50 years ago 🙂

The original owner had scribbled some notes on the front (as sewists often do!) and made it for a little Michael in 1965. What were the chances – I have a little Michael in my life! At two and a half years old, my nephew is a big strong boy, so I figured child size 4 might be on the big side, but it would make sure there’s growing room. I just couldn’t resist. I set out to make the vest as it’s the most versatile.

I had some leftover navy blue wool/poly twill from a skirt, and enough lining for the project. It was such a quick sew and great use of those awkward leftovers that are “too big to give away but too small to make something”. Based on this logic, I think I’ll be making many, many more things for my nephews!

Kid – you look good!

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