1930s | 1940s | Modern Patterns | Pants / Trousers | Vintage Sewing

Smooth Sailing Trousers – My First Pair of Pants!

By on May 31, 2015

After going through a phase of sewing nothing but knit dresses and T-shirts, I’m back with a very vintage-style garment! This is my first pair of pants, made from the Smooth Sailing Trousers pattern from Wearing History. Since I became interested in vintage styles, I’ve always loved 30’s/40’s style wide-leg trousers, and this pattern was exactly what I was looking for! It’s hard to see because the fabric is black, but there are pleats at the front, darts at the back, a side zipper, and optional cuffs, belt loop and belt. I made the version without cuffs, but with the belt loops. I skipped the belt, though, because I have a couple black belts already!

I cut a size 12 for the muslin and graded to a 14 at the hips, but ended up sizing up for a little more ease at the waist. I tweaked the fit a little though by keeping the darts, pleats and crotch curve from the size 12. I also shortened the pieces by 2″.

I used a bamboo rayon (not sure what to call it exactly) with nice drape, but it ended up being really shifty and stretchy on the bias after I washed it – it was originally very crisp and linen-like. It probably wasn’t ideal for these pants, because they’ve really stretched out and need re-hemming (possibly some other alterations too…).

The pattern is very simple to construct, perfect for someone new to making pants. The hardest part was working with the fabric! If they hadn’t stretched out so much, I would have been very happy with how they turned out. Right now, I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with them, but I’ve made anther pair and I can definitely say that I love the pattern and the style!

For more photos and construction details, check out my blog! I also wrote a detailed review of the pattern as a guest post on Sew Sweetness, if you want to know more about the pattern itself!

Oh, and I also made the blouse I’m wearing in these photos. It’s the Sewaholic Pendrell, made from a muumuu that I bought at a thrift store! Thanks for reading!

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1930s | 1940s

Housedress with Pockets

By on May 21, 2015

Long-time reader, first-time poster. This housedress is based on “The Magic Nightgown” at http://sewingvintage.blogspot.ca/2012/08/the-magic-nightgown.html, but in a cotton print, knee-length for a more 1940s look, and with patch pockets added. I made bias tape from the leftover fabric rather than using contrasting tape to finish the sleeves and neck opening. Also, I only did two darts. I think next time I make up this pattern, I’ll follow the “small” measurements for the neck opening, shoulder breadth and armholes, as the latter are slightly larger than I could have wished, but overall, I’m pleased with the look and the comfort of this casual dress. purple_dress

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1930s | Capes | Vintage Sewing

#CapeletAlong with SewRetroRose

By on April 8, 2015

I just finished up a sew-along collaboration between the lovely Beccie from SewRetroRose and Decades of Style, completing this lovely 1930’s Capelet.

Let me just tell you what an amazing project this was. I really feel that this one stretched my limits as a seamstress, and I learned some wonderful new techniques along the way.

Before I get to photos of the finished project, let me walk you through the construction.

On Beccie’s (SewRetroRose) suggestion I made a muslin for this project. I’m glad I did because while I didn’t need to make any huge changes, I felt much more confident when cutting into my fashion fabric. I must admit I do love the plaid fabric I used for the muslin, so this may get finished and be wearable one day.

I decided on this lovely light pink and brown houndstooth corduroy that I had about 4 yards of in my fabric stash. I felt that it had the perfect weight and drape for this project.

The bodice came together really easily in this project. I didn’t add the extra length to the cape as Beccie did with hers, nor did I do a full lining. I wanted to and honestly I bought a lovely chocolate brown satin that was to become the lining, but I chickened out on that at the last minute. Next time I’ll try the lining! I promise!

This project was the first time I’d done bound buttonholes. I’m so pleased with how they turned out, even though I ended up with a few minor mistakes, they came together so easily.

This is one of those minor mistakes… I didn’t think about the nap of the fabric and which direction each facing was well facing… Oops. 🙂 Honestly, I ended up with two going each direction in a alternating pattern, so I’m gonna sell it as a design element! 😉

Next I moved onto the cape itself. This was very easily put together.

Here is the cape pinned onto the bodice! Thank to my lovely Millie being there for fittings. She’s such a fabulous helper… and so quiet!!

And now here it is stitched into place. I did have to adjust the stitch line a bit because it didn’t lay just right the first time I sewed it down.

After that it was just a matter of finishing the armholes, adding and tacking the facings and sewing on the buttons. I was so excited to be in the home stretch on this one. I knew from using Millie that it was going to fit, but I really wanted to see how it looked on me, and that was next to impossible to know for sure without those buttons.

I catchstiched all of my facings, which was another first for me. I’ve never used that stitch before. I also bound all of my seams with bias… it’s a slightly different shade of brown that my fabric, but it’s on the inside and no one should notice.

I’m sure your all eager to see the finished capelet by now. So thanks for sticking around through this long and picture heavy post! You’re undoubtedly the best readers around!

Here she is in all of her glory. I feel like calling her Clara because I feel like this is something Clara Bow would have worn and loved. It’s just the right amount of glamour and sophistication.

Picture credit to silentsaregolden.com

I chose large brown wooden buttons with a filigree pattern jigsawed out of the center. I searched for days for the right buttons and I’m so pleased with these.

So there you have it! My completed Decades of Style 1930’s Capelet! Now she needs a skirt…

Look for this make in the near future… but not so near future. I’m leaving on Friday with my two little ones to get on a jet plane and fly home to Sunny Florida!! We’ll be gone for 17 days and it will be a much needed vacation from work and the cold dreary Ohio spring. See you all when I get back! There may be an update or two during the time I’m gone, I am taking my laptop, but there may not be if we get too busy having fun. So don’t despair if you don’t see me. I will be back!

Much love to you all!!

~MissKacySews

www.shessewbettie.blogspot.com

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1930s | Dresses

1937 dress

By on March 17, 2015

voor 21.20.14This my first garment for this year’s Vintage Sewing Pattern Pledge: A dress design from 1937, made using a reproduction pattern from EvaDress (which I bought with my prize from last year’s Vintage Sewing Pattern Pledge).

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The pattern was easy to use and the instruction were clear and easy to follow but I struggled a bit with the fit. I’m so used to drafting my own patterns and knowing how they are going to fit…

zijWhen I made a muslin using my size according to the sizing table, it was way to big. Even when I went down a size, it was still pretty roomy. I agonized a bit over period accuracy and then decided to try and make it so I would wear this dress. Which is how it became like this.

I shared those considerations both on my blog and on We Sew Retro – Sew & Tell and I got a lot of great advice.

I think the dress is OK as it is now but I will probably try and make it again in something like a very soft cotton or a viscose/rayon crepe.

You can read more about it on my blog.

 

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1930s

Making My Wedding and Reception Dresses

By on March 6, 2015

I have finally completed my blog post on constructing my wedding dresses.  As some of you may know I got married last October and was crazy enough to make not only my wedding dress, but a separate dress for the reception. I don’t have as many construction pictures would like to share the few I do have. The pattern I used for my wedding dress was the 1934 Evening Gown With Drop Sleeves from the Vintage Pattern Lending Library.

The VPLL ships fast and does a very nice job in packing your order. Look how nice my little bundle of patterns were! I ordered three patterns in all. Each time you purchase a pattern, or leave a review, you earn points towards future purchasing. They patterns are printed on a nice quality paper. The instructions are pretty clear and easy to follow with some additional information provided as well.

My first task after receiving my pattern from the VPLL was to resize it. While the VPLL does offer some patterns in multiple sizes, this was not one of them. This pattern actually goes together rather well, despite my fitting issues. For the bodice I treated the lace and lining as one. The lace pieces were first basted to the lining and then the bodice was sewn together. Next the bias tape binding was added to the neck edges and arm holes. I didn’t have any white or off white on hand so I used peach which I think made a nice contrast to the lace. I made a few small changes, mainly to omit the extra large fluffy sleeves and to add a RIDICULOUSLY long train.

You can read more about my wedding dresses here.

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1930s | 1940s

Vintage Support for the hourglass

By on January 3, 2015

So as I’m doing the HSF (which is now historical sew monthly) and the first theme is Foundations I thought I’d try making a 1930s/40s bra (and girdle..but that’s another subject). Anyway started with the pattern in Vintage Lingerie by Jill Salen. I sort of combined both patterns. I draped the basic pattern.

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1930s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

Tea at Two

By on January 1, 2015

I squeezed one last project in before 2014 came to a close. Recently, I’ve been inspired by 1930s fashions so this dress is the next step on my journey to a 1930s wardrobe.

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The pattern I used is Wearing History’s Tea at Two dress. Original 1930s sewing patterns can be expensive and hard to find so I love reproduction patterns! Plus this one was multi-sized which is always a bonus.

1930s day dress

I found an adorable set of white vintage buttons on etsy that were just perfect for this outfit! I love using vintage notions in my sewing projects because the add that extra touch of authenticity to an outfit.

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It’s been unusually warm in my new home state, Florida, so I did get a chance to wear this dress recently even though it feels quite spring inspired to me. I’m sure it will get loads more wear when the weather warms back up for good in the spring.

 

More photos and construction details over on my blog.

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