1920s | Accessories | Bags / Purses | Blouses | Embroidery | Hats | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

A 1920 Ensemble

By on March 15, 2017

This outfit is my foray into the world of the late teens and early 20’s.  I used two patterns from Past Patterns, dated to circa 1920, for both my blouse and skirt, while my purse was made from a tapestry remnant and Vogue #7252, from the year 2000.  My hat is a thrift store find which I decorated to make-do and my shoes are close reproductions from Jeffrey Campbell.  I used primarily cotton for all pieces – even thread!  There are so many fine details to this set – the blouse has my hand-stitched floral designs on the neck, shoulders, and sleeves while I used old original glass teens/20’s era buttons for the front closure of the blouse.  There are real brass buttons along the pocket panel of the skirt…and check out those awesomely enormous pockets as big as mini suitcases!  My background was one of the very first “arcade” indoor shopping malls in our country, a lovely Gothic place built in 1919.  To see and read more, please visit my blog post here.

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1920s | Downton Abbey Inspired | Vintage Sewing

Early 1920s Cardigan

By on April 20, 2016

One garment from the 1910s and 1920s that often gets overlooked is the belted cardigan. However, it’s actually a classic piece of fashion history from this time period and often pops up in period dramas based in these eras. Women wore them about the house to keep warm before central heating became the norm, you could probably equate them to modern day hoodies!

1920s wool cardigan

I’ve always found them fascinating and have always loved to have one, but most were knitted and I, very annoyingly, cannot knit. So, when I saw this original 1920s wool jersey one on Pinterest I knew I needed to try and make my own version. It would be a perfect challenge for my next Vintage Pledge.

Early 1920s outfit

And here it is! I based the design on an original 1930s cardigan sewing pattern I had, although the 1920s detailing of the large patch pockets and double button belt were just guess work.

Top stitching detail on 1920s cardigan

Sportswear inspired clothing was just beginning to creep into fashion during the early part of the 1920s and one detail that was used in the majority of these garments was top-stitching. I added loads of it to this cardigan to really give it a sportswear feel which was a huge challenge, trying to keep it straight and neat everywhere!

If you would like to read more about how how I made this early 1920s cardigan and see more photos, feel free to pop over to my blog.

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1920s | Dresses

From 1929

By on March 27, 2016

voor1Today, I finally finished this dress! Tracing out the pattern for it was the first sewing related thing I did this year but it took me three months to actually finish it. Normally, I sew pretty quickly but this time, I kept being held up by other things, other sewing and the need to find the right fabric.

And in the end, I think it is for the best that I had some time to let the toile “marinade” on the sewing room table. The dress was way too sack-shaped initially and I think the solution I came up with in the end is much better than anything I considered back in January.

2This was the pattern. A wedding dress from Gracieuse magazine nr. 16 from 1929 (this magazine was published twice a month). I shortened the skirt so it would not be a wedding dress.

1This was the toile. Very, very baggy.

In the end, I adjusted it by simply taking out 10 cm at center front. This meant sacrificing the cowl-neck (one of the features for which I chose the dress) but fixing all the other issues.

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I am very pleased with the finished dress. 1920’s styles are always tricky. Their loose shapes are just so far removed from anything we are used to. I think this one is a happy medium though: I think it can still be recognized as a 1920’s look but it also looks sleek and elegant to my eyes which are attuned to more modern styles (usually starting in 1947…)

As usual, there is more about the dress, including more pictures, on my blog

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1920s | Blouses | Downton Abbey Inspired | Giveaway | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

1920s Silk Blouse and Pleated Skirt

By on March 11, 2016

After admiring everyone else’s achievements last year for A Stitching Odyssey’s Vintage Pledge I decided that this year I was going to join in. My own pledge was to challenge and push myself with my sewing. I’ve just finished my first outfit for the pledge, a 1920s silk blouse and pleated skirt. I created the pattern for the blouse by tracing around a simple silk top I already had and then making my own adjustments. The pattern for the skirt was McCall’s M7022 pleated skirt which I lengthened to a more suitable 1920s style.

1920s blouse, skirt and cloche hat

I used a beautiful Pre-Raphaelite inspired green and purple floral silk for the blouse which I bought from the fabulous ClothSpot and this was my first challenge. I’d never worked with silk before so was really, really nervous about starting it and I put it off for about four months. The Vintage Pledge was just what I needed to force myself to be brave and just get on with it. As it turned out there was nothing to worry about!

Pre-Raphaelite inspired silk fabric

I added vintage, probably early 20th Century, jet buttons to both the front of the blouse and at the side to close the band around the bottom.

1920s blouse, skirt and cloche hat

The skirt is in a black cotton twill that I dug out from my stash. I’m not overly happy with it, mainly because the fabric is all wrong for the style of skirt, it’s way too stiff. I’m not sure if I’ll try and adjust it or just make a different one.

If you would like to read more about how the whole outfit and see more photos feel free to pop over to my blog. And while you’re there why not check out my latest post where I’m running a giveaway of £40 to spend on fabrics at ClothSpot. (Giveaway ends midnight 20th March 2016)

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1920s | Hats

A cloche

By on May 12, 2015

When I made a hat to go with my 1950’s suit, I got interested in making other styles of hats as well.

Hats can be tricky for me. Not all styles work with long hair and a fringe. But I really liked the idea of making a 1920’s style cloche and fortunately, I had some patterns in my 1920’s Gracieuse magazines.

10This is the design I picked but I didn’t add the scarf.

patroonThe pattern looks like this. Different from any more modern cloche pattern I’ve ever seen.

clocheI made my hat from a material that is definitely not period accurate: thick synthetic felt. I cut the pieces without seam allowance and sewed them edge to edge by hand.

cloche2I think it’s a fun hat and it will count towards my Vintage Sewing Pattern Pledge. I’m not so sure it looks like something from the 1920’s though 😉

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1920s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

1920s White Lightning Dress

By on April 14, 2015

Greetings everyone! I’d like to share with you the dress I made for the Greater Boston Vintage Society’s White Lightning Ball. The event was held back in March at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum. I had a couple people tell me I looked like Lady Edith from Downton Abbey! 🙂

I made a new dress using a 1920s pattern – Vogue 9010 – that I purchased over the winter. I used a lovely ivory silk that I purchased from Deletable Mountain Cloth during their winter sale. The silk struck me as very Art Deco and I really liked the design and feel of it. So light weight. I used a cotton muslin to test the pattern. It looks rather odd because I didn’t have enough fabric to cut the full length of the right front panel. Not really an issue though as this was just a mock up. The dress is made from a back panel cut on the fold with little darts at the neck, a left front, a right front, girdle, as well as bodice and skirt cascades. I left the sleeves off . The right front crosses over the left and attaches with a series of snaps on the bodice and hips. The girdle is sewn into one side seam then wraps around the back and attaches at the opposite hip. I added a few extra snaps for good measure. Because my silk was rather delicate I made little cotton patches to go behind the snaps for extra support.

The pattern gives you the option of either hemming the edges or trimming off the seam allowance and adding a binding. My original plan was to only use a yellow/gold trim because I wanted to pair the dress with gold shoes. The binding was sewn first to the right side of the silk then folded over and pressed and hand sewn in place.

Summary of the Pattern
Fabric: Silk from Delectable Mountain Cloth
Pattern: Vogue 9010
Year: 1920s
Notions: Snaps, thread, pink and yellow China silk ribbon for binding
How historically accurate is it? Very.
Any tricky parts to the pattern? Not really
Did you change anything? Left off the sleeves for more of an evening look. Shortened the hem about 1 1/2″. I also added some additional snaps to the waist/hip area and some extra shirring to the girdle. The dress was a little high under the arms so I cut the arm holes a little deeper.
Time to complete: ummm, hard to say. I worked on it off and one for about 2 weeks.
First worn: March 28th, 2015 for the GBVS 2nd White Lightening Ball at the Larz Anderson Car Museum
Wear Again? Yes.
Notes: Due to the cascades and overall feel of this particular style, this pattern does need to be made with fabric that drapes nicely. One should also avoid fabrics with an obvious right and wrong side. My mock up was made using a cotton muslin which didn’t really hang right. It worked well for determining the overall fit of the pattern however and allowed me to mark up the fabric as needed. If I make this pattern again, which I would like to for day wear, I might try it with crepe and a contrasting cascade.

More photos and construction pictures on my blog.

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1920s | Aprons | Vintage Sewing

My 1920’s House Apron: A One Yard Wonder

By on April 9, 2015

If you have an urge to use up some of your fabric stash, or simply have an hour to spare for some much needed crafting time, try this easy tutorial to make a charming slip-over apron. Based on an 1926 pattern, this adorable apron features a scooped front, slightly gathered back, and two fabric ties.

Supplies:

1 yard (36″ wide) of cotton fabric

5 yards of bias tape

Optional: rickrack

Tools:

Paper or spare fabric to make pattern

ruler and marker

Scissors and pins

Sewing Machine

Let’s get started:

First you will need to create the pattern. Below is a visual of the pattern (yellow calico) over the apron fabric. The fabric is folded in a giant triangle, with the two open ends at the bottom and on the left. The fold is in the top right hand side.

Use the numbers as a guide to create the pattern. To adjust for wearer’s height, adjust the 36″ width up or down as needed. Wish to make the apron wider around the middle, simply use more yardage and extend the two inches at the underarm and around the bottom.

You can cut out the extra ties and optional pocket from the cut off width of your fabric.

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Now that you have your pattern pieces cut out, along with the ties, sew the back seam of the apron, right sides together.

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Pin the bias tape along all raw edges, making sure to catch the edge of the fabric. Stitch.

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If you would like a pocket, cut out the desired shape, press the edges toward the wrong side of the fabric and pin to the apron. You can add rick rack or other trim to the pocket if you like…just make sure to add the trim BEFORE you attach the pocket. Stitch the pocket to the apron.

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With right sides together, sew the ties, turn right side out, and press. Stitch with raw ends folded underneath to the inside of the apron.

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That’s it! Enjoy your new vintage inspired apron around the kitchen, craft room, or out in the garden!

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Source: Fashion Service, 1929 as seen in Vintage Notions by Amy Barickman

 

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