1910s

Entering the Edwardian…

by silverstah on January 15, 2013 · 4 comments

in 1910s

One of the schools I work for is doing a production of JB Priestly’s ‘An Inspector Calls’ in February, and our stock of Edwardian fashion is… non-existent.  Since the cast is small, we decided to build the women’s dresses – which means two evening dresses and a maid’s outfit.  Exciting!

This week, I’ve been working on the toile for Sheila, the daughter – the unbleached muslin will be a heavy peachy-pink satin.  The light blue is a sheer pink chiffon, and the white is the pink chiffon with a lace net overlay:

 

Looks simple, right?  Well, let’s break it down.  That white overlay will hook directly to the dress.  Let’s take that off:

One that is unhooked, then we need to unhook the overskirt (the blue, here – it will be a sheer chiffon on the actual dress:

The front bodice panel will open like so, to reveal an underbodice which closes with hooks and eyes.  The skirt has a center front opening which will close flush with snaps, which the overskirt hides.

That’s an awful lot of closures!  For such simple looking little dresses, these Edwardian frocks are complicated to get in and out of!

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Cross-posted to my blog Isis’ Wardrobe http://isiswardrobe.blogspot.dk/

This is probably my oldest project and I’m very pleased to have it out of my way. The blouse with its embroideries were bought as a kit for about 15 years ago! It is a reproduction, so cut and embroidery are based on an actual blouse from the 1910′s. I worked on it on and off for a couple of years until the embroideries were done, but for the last ten years, or so, it has been waiting to be sewn together. I thank The Historically Sew Fortnightly project for giving me a nudge to finally finish it.

 

The blouse is in linen and the embroideries in whitework in linen thread. Both back and front have embroideries as well as the collar and the cuffs. The shape is rather simple, though the side seams are curved to give the blouse some shape.

As I started this project such a long time ago I found that the blouse was now a bit too small over the bust. In my stash I found some linen lace that my grandmother had made, so I mounted that on a piece of leftover linen and inserted that at the front. That probably made the blouse a bit more un-correct for the time as that made the blouse so wide that it is now possible to pull it over my head. As I wanted to finish it I decided to leave the buttons out. However, the insert that made the bust part in the right size, also made it too wide above it.

 
When I was finishing it yesterday I felt at loss on how to cope with that without destroying the embroideries as my mind only came up with darts. For this photo I solved it by fold the surplus and hold it together. Now when I look at the pictures I realise that I can, of course, unpick the neck and cut away some fabric at the centre front before re-attaching it to the lace. Oh well, it is wearable as it is now, so for now I will call it a day.
 
 
 

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Happy New Year all! I’m very excited to be sharing my first make of 2013 with you – Folkwear’s Armistice Blouse - which also happens to be my most cherished make to date. Aside from the beautiful pattern details, I made it using silk that my great grandmother spun/wove with her own two hands in the 1940s. I know nothing about the technicalities of weaving silk fabric – but I do know that she even nurtured the silk worms herself.

This blouse dates from 1918 and has such a deliciously romantic and floaty feel to it. The reason it’s so flattering to wear is the gathered back, which counteracts some of the fullness of the design. This is cleverly constructed by actually gathering the back and then sewing the self-made tie over the gathers.

Of course the over-sized collar and front panel are the real stars of this blouse and lend themselves to so much modification. I kept mine pretty simple though to let the exquisite silk and lace really shine. The pattern calls for functional buttons, but the ones I added – cute little heart-shaped ones – are purely decorative as I can actually slip this on and off without the need for any closures.

This blouse is full of unique details, which make it a true pleasure to construct. Just look at these elaborate double cuffs with the added lace and tiny buttons!

This make is also special as it is part of a bigger project – Watch This Lace - set in motion last summer when I came across a rather large bundle of beautiful vintage lace After much consideration, I couldn’t get A Common Thread Project out of my mind, the inspired idea from Mena of The Sew Weekly. The tantalising thought of sharing my loot with sewing bloggers internationally and showcasing our different creations was too good to pass up. So I got in touch with eight of many, many beloved bloggers and they agreed to help brighten our last two winter months! To see which bloggers are taking part in Watch This Lace and for more photos and background on my cherished Armistice Blouse hop on over to my blog.

 

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The sisters Crawley- Lady Edith, Lady Mary and Lady Sybil, season 2

for many, many moons now i’ve wanted to adapt this dinner dress of lady mary’s (circa 1918 in the show) into something wearable and a little more modern for myself. you may even recall some of my earlier ideas.
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after a few false starts, i settled on adapting the design to a t-shirt as the most wearable and achievable goal.  there were some construction adventures, but in the end i’m pretty happy.

full post and more photos at puu’s door of time.
top styled with a modified 1940s simplicity 2571.

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