Vintage Sewing

They don’t make it anymore the way they used to

By on October 27, 2016

Some time ago (oh my, 2 years to be precise) one lady from my family had heard about the fact I’m sewing and she approached me with a request.

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In general I don’t grant “would sew me this or that” favors, but there were 3 things that made the situation different that time:
1) the lady had a fabric that we both loved
2) she has waited patiently for me to sew the dress for 2 years without as much as a word of hurrying me up
3) she wanted to have a dress like the ones worn in her youth, that is the late 60s. She sighed, looked at the clothes in her closet and said “They just don’t make it anymore the way they used to in the 1960s, you know”.

 

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The trick was that she only had a 140cm (about 1,5 yards) of the fabric. I chose Simplicity 1609, a 60s repro, because if the iconic and clearly defined A-line of the dress and clever shaping with only 4 main pieces, but the pattern called for at least 170cm of fabric.
That is why, my dear Readers, the print is awfully mismatched at the seams.
Have mercy.

The back
The back

I changed the fastening- instead of a long back zipper I made a small opening at the neck with a tiny button and a loop made of a strip os bias-cut self-fabric with the stretch steamed out of it. As you can see in one of the photos above, I also made a small string-like belt to help with accentuating the waist.

 

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Because I had so little fabric, I hemmed it with a help of white satin bias ribbon, hand stitched (as always) to avoid marking the fabric from the outside.

I invite you to visit my blog, rvdzik.blogspot.com, to read more about the pattern alterations and see the photos of the insides of the dress 🙂

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1960s

Panting for pants

By on September 13, 2016

Recently, as I started learning how to drive, it made me realise that my closet needs something which would be car-friendly. Since one needs to drive in quite flat shoes (ugh), separates like pencil/straight skirts are out – it’s a terrible combination on me. Circle skirts work, but hey – my driving instructor lets out a quiet sigh every time I try to fit a long wool circle skirt with a petticoat into a B-segment vehicle.
Soooo it was time for pants.

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Even though I rarely wear pants, I really like the lines of 1950s pedal pushers and 1960s cigarette trousers; I decided to recreate them with model 108E from 8/2010 Burda’s Jackie Kennedy Onassis themed editorial. I used vintage wool mix gabardine. The pattern was a delight to sew and needed only few alterations (I skipped the pockets and tightened the waist). My shirt is Simplicity 2154, which was released as a 1960s reprodution – made in cream cotton it has already been worn over and over again.

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Even though this outfit does feel too modern, I surprisingly get lots of wear out of it. I’m glad I gave it a go 🙂 I invite you to read more on my blog, rvdzik.blogspot.com

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1950s

Swing high, swing low….and hello!

By on August 27, 2016

Swing high, swing low….and hello!Hello! It’s my first post here. I’m Ewa 🙂 I hope I’ll be allowed to become a part of this wonderful community, which I have followed for such a long time!

Some time ago I thrifted over 8 yards of soft navy corduroy. I’ve never really been a fan of this fabric; it reminds me of the children’s clothes of the early 1990s, but there was something about this navy beauty that caught my eye and I decided to give it a try.

1 All the photos taken by my patient Husband 😉

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I used a vintage pattern- Butterick 6288. I was so frustrated as 2 of the pattern pieces (the sleeves!) were missing, but I liked the pattern too much to just leave it. So I had to quickly educate myself and draft them on my own.

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I decided to make the coat mid-calf lenght, with 7/8 sleeves that can be turned back to 3/4. To make the coat even more fitted in the shoulder area, I moved most of the sleeves’ ease to the sides instead of the top of the cap.

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The coat fastens with 7 covered snaps (the button is purely ornamental). The collar and the facings were interfaced with canvas, pad-stitched to give them shape. I blind hemmed the coat, sewed the lining (setting the sleeves by hand) and blind hemmed it as well; it is slip-stitched to the coat along the collar and facings, with small ‘catch points’ along the side seams as well. The back lining is connected to the coat only by french tacks, to let the main fabric drape freely.

1415The not-so-glamourous but oh-so-practical covered sweat pads.

For more photos and more details about the coat I invite you to have a look at my blog, rvdzik.blogspot.com. 🙂 Thank you!

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