Evie

I participated in the Vintage Playsuit Sew-Along hosted by Stephanie over at The Girl With the Star-Spangled Heart. I’m a few days behind on the final playsuit posts because I ran into a few technical issues (first my iron died and then my skirt was too small and had to be fixed), but I finally have all four pieces finished and photographed. I’ve shown you all the patterns before, so I won’t go into much of that today; it’s pretty much be a photo post, but I will explain a little about this skirt. The pattern illustration indicates that this is a fairly full, A-line garment. Let me tell ya. It’s not. At all. The skirt actually turned out looking a whole lot more 70s than 40s. It’s a super narrow A-line, and that plus the mid-calf length really make me feel like I need to part my hair in the center, go braless, and carry a macrame bag. That being said, I do still like the skirt, it’s just not quite what I had originally planned on. The other issue, was that despite all the pattern measurements and everything checking out, the skirt was entirely too snug, causing pulling at the pockets and the button placket over my stomach, not to mention the lack of room in the waist. Not appropriate for pizza feasts, this one. I had already done a lot of the finishing and really wasn’t looking forward to taking everything apart and recutting the waistband, etc, so what I ended up doing was adding a placket extension to the underlap in order to give myself some room to shift the buttons over. That made a huge difference. I also had to shift the buttonhole placement quite a bit so that I wasn’t getting the gapping across my stomach that was happening with the original placement. Despite the issues, I’m pretty happy with the end result, and it will work well with all of my solid t-shirts/camisoles and sweaters as well. So here it is, followed by the other three pieces.

 

 

 

For more information about the patterns I used, along with a few more pictures of the garments themselves, the previous two posts about the sew-along can be found here and here.

 

-Evie

 

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I’m in the market for a new iron, and since I’ve never actually owned a “new” iron (yes, I’ve been using other people’s castoffs, for shame), I’m not 100% sure what I want to get. I don’t mind spending a little bit more, because I want to get something that’s going to work really well and last a long time. What are your favorites?

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I made myself a new everyday dress. It’s from a mail order pattern I’ve had in my collection for a while. I don’t have an exact date on the pattern, but it looks like a very early 40s design. It’s Anne Adams 4811. I wanted to make something a little different than most of what I have in my current wardrobe, and this softer styled shirtdress was just what I was looking for. The rayon challis print that I used for it makes for an incredibly light, comfortable summer dress.

I interfaced the collar and front facings to keep the edges nice and crisp and support the buttons/buttonholes in this fairly limp-bodied fabric, and the drape and feel of the whole dress is wonderful. I ended up needing to grade all the seams in at the waist, as well as grading them in slightly over the bust and through the shoulders. The pattern as is was surprisingly rectangular, despite the very shapely envelope illustration. I’m very happy with the final fit of the dress. The only other real change I made was to shift the bust gathers up about 1.5 inches (as some of you may have seen in my query from not too long ago). The original position of the gathers was ridiculously and unflatteringly low, even if it had been an earlier 1930s, droopy chested dress. Moving them up made a HUGE difference to the overall look of the dress. I actually wasn’t sure how much I was going to like it once I started assembling the pieces, but now that it’s finished I honestly think it might be my new favorite dress. I kind of want to make three more.

 This dress will definitely be getting a lot of wear this summer and into the fall. It’s nice to have something with a slightly different silhouette than most of my other clothes, and the colors make me really happy. I’ve got enough of the fabric left for another project, and I think I may whip up some sort of 1930s style Hooverette, or maybe another version of my other favorite dresses:

 

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I’ve got a quick question for you all. I’m working on a dress right now form an early 40s pattern. It has bust gathers on the side-front panels along the princess seam. I gathered according to the marks on the pattern piece, but the position of the gathers once I tried it on seemed incredibly low to me. I shifted the gathers up about 1.5 inches on one side of the dress to see if that worked better, but can’t quite decide whether I should go ahead and stick with that alteration or just follow the original markings.

The gathers on the left in the photo are obviously the ones that I moved up. This has resulted in a slightly pointier bust shape, but also adds a little visual lift (which can’t hurt any of us, right?). The lower gathers keep a nice smooth line over the bust though, which is nice, except that it makes things look a little droopier (it sits a little more smoothly on me since my mannequin hasn’t nursed a baby and her bust sits a little higher).

So, keep them where they were and maintain the smoother line…or move them up on my actual bust point and deal with some kind of pointy boobs?

Thanks!

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