1940s | Dresses

A 40s wool dress with sunray-darts

By on February 24, 2017

While spring is already knocking at the door, I had the idea to sew a wintery wool dress. This pattern is included in a booklet with fabric-saving-pattens from 1944. It features a very slim skirt, slightly puffed sleeves and sunray darts around the neck.

I used a pure wool fabric in dark green for the dress and a black wool fabric for the contrasting belt and  bow. Unfortunately I was a bit over-ambitious and sized the pattern down too much, now it fits a little tight and has sleeves that are a little on the short side. But I do love it and am very happy with the result.

Here is a the original pattern drawing:

More photos and details I included on my blog parvasedapta.ch

Greetings from Switzerland,

ette

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1950s | Blouses | Dresses | Skirts | Vintage Sewing

50ies with an Asian touch

By on March 29, 2015

More or less ten years ago, my father gave me a Shalvar Kameez when he came back from a trip to Pakistan. Unfortunately it wasn’t my size and due to the lack of opportunities to wear such a garment in central Europe, altering it wasn’t ranging very high on my schedule.

When Tuppence Ha’Penny published a post on 50ies dresses inspired by indian Saris, I knew what I wanted my Shalwar Kameez to become.

But it took me until this year to finally start this project. I chose a 1955/6 Lutterloh-pattern, a blouse with a matching skirt. It fit without any alterations, I only changed the cut of the skirt a little, using the dupatta, the scarf, as a ruched bottom, the pattern was meant to be plain without the ruffled layer.

Waistband and collar are lined with fusible interfacing, the cotton fabric is very soft and not stiff enough without.

The blouse was made from the top (the kameez), the facings and the top part of the skirt from the trousers (the shalwar), the ruche as mentioned was the dupatta.

The fact that it consists of two parts enables me to wear it as seperates as well, I can well imagine the skirt with a plain white blouse or the blouse with high-waisted jeans.

To see more photos, including one “before”-pic, have a look at my blog, Parva sed apta.

Thank you for your attention,

ette

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1940s | Dresses | Vintage Sewing

Now as autumn approaches…

By on September 20, 2014

…I thought I should make myself a dress to be prepared for dropping temperatures.

The fabric is a slightly stretchy light-yellow polyester-weave. As a pattern I picked this dress from the march 1940 issue of “Beyers Mode für Alle”, on the pattern sheet was also the pattern piece for long sleeves.

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I skipped the pockets because I couldn’t see the use of two very narrow pockets getting bulky right between my legs, there are few easier ways to ruin a dress.

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I removed a total 14cm underbust-circumference to make the dress fitting as it is now, before the whole bodice part fit very loosely. Another 6cm circumference was removed at bust-height and the upper sleeves. This and a higher hem was all it took to make a 194- pattern look as modern as this 🙂

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yes, a ding at the zipper, I see this. But because it will be worn when it is colder I hope enough underskirts will fix it. If not I can still change this.

The length is a little short for 1940, I know. But the dress is so high-necked and well behaved, I thought it needed this length to look less severe, of course the pattern was a good deal longer.

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I hope you like it, more pictures and details on my blog,

love

ette

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1930s | Dresses

I spotted Hollywood

By on July 7, 2014

Last year in late autumn I spotted a beautiful Bette Davis Pattern on etsy, Hollywood 1221, published in 1934. And my boyfriend was so kind to give it to me as a christmas-present.

I already copied the pattern a few days after the holidays (because the pattern is so old I don’t want to use the original pattern pieces anymore), but it wasn’t until a few weeks ago I finally decided for a fabric and started cutting.

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The choice of fabric wasn’t that intelligent in hindsight. I used1,5m of a white spotted green cotton print I bought a few years ago in the odds-and-ends-box of a nearby fabric store that doesn’t exist anymore. I chose it because I thought it was close enough to the spotted fabric on the envelope drawing and could look good (but it is not really appropriate for this time, in the sewing magazines I own polka dots don’t appear earlier than late 30ies, in earlier issues I only found them to be used for children’s clothing).
For this project it was just enough, I had to cut the lower back in two pieces, otherwise it wouldn’t have fit.

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Well, the resulting dress is really…dotty. The matching of the pattern is at some seams better than at others, unfortunately where it didn’t fit was in the centre front (in contrast to the text on the linked page, it is a two-piece skirt. There is no seam in the pleat and I didn’t think of adjusting the width of it to match the dots).

 

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The pattern asked for two zippers, on at the side and one in the centre back. I used a white nylon zipper in the neck and a light cream one in the side seam (because I had them in stock, I do know they aren’t authentic for the 30ies)  Both zipper-seams are hand-sewn as is the hem.

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I used white thread for all seams, this seemed to be a better match than green one.

The size is a straightforward 12, only thing I changed is I shortened the hem by 7cm.

Because the pattern was too weird with the stomacher in between I applied a rest of white cotton ribbon after having already finished it, now it is a lot better.

 

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I used every bit of it. As you see, it wasn’t enough to attach it on both ends of the stomacher-part in the back as well, the rest I had was just enough to form the button-loop for a button in the neck above the zipper.

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As I said, I didn’t change anything. Like the most american patterns, the seam allowance is  included, something still unusual for me (it is uncommon in europe), because it makes it difficult for me to imagine how large it will be in the end (and in this case it was difficult to match the fabric pattern as well). When looking at the result it seems as if the bodice is a little too long, when making it again I should try to shorten the stomacher-part.

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I hope you like it!

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So much for today, love

ette

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1940s | Coats

A 1940ies winter coat

By on March 16, 2014

This project took what felt like forever and were in fact three years. In autumn and early winter I never had time to finish it and after christmas motivation was gone because I so longed for spring.

It was one of the first vintage pattern I ever bought and I had no experience in sewing with these at all. This led to a number of mistakes and a wrong sizing, most of them clearly visible in the final coat, at least to me.

Fabric is a felted cotton, the lining matches the colour of the burgundy bias binding accentuating the front seams. Pattern is a 40ies Beyer-Pattern, the coat is meant to be a “traditional style”-coat and with it came patterns for different dresses, blouses and skirts, all in “dirndl”-style.

An enumeration of all the things that went wrong as well as more photos can be found on my blog www.parvasedapta.ch.

Thank you very much for reading, love

ette

 

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1940s | Culottes / Pantskirts | Vintage Sewing

1942 Culotte

By on August 4, 2013

Hello!

This is my first post here on WeSewRetro. I have read this blog for months and love the projects presented here, now I finally decided to join the party 🙂

The project I want to show to you comes from a 1942 issue of “Frau und Mode” (= Wife and Fashion), a Swiss magazine. It was given as a supplement with another Magazine and contains mainly knitting patterns or pictures of dresses, for which you could order paper patterns, so unfortunately there are only very few sewing patterns in it.

This set consists of a culotte and a cape. I only made the former because I couldn’t think of any occation to wear this cape. The cut parts to enlarge and the instructions (in german) can be found on my blog.

I went for a coarse linen istead of the waterproof fabric the pattern suggested, planning to wear it in the summer and not as a cycling-outfit for rainy days, though that’s what it was designed for (the Headline says “For our female cyclists”).

I love the vertical seam originating at the belt, making a step to form the pocket and going all the way down to the hem. It is better to see in the drawing than in the photos.

The pleats only open in the bottom half, as you can see in the photo. It’s a little weird, because the crotch seam and the seam closing the pleat form kind of a triangle, which is a little difficult to press, but doesn’t show when worn.

From the side it really looks like a skirt:

I hope you like it, you will find more photos on my blog, see you soon, love

ette

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