brocobelle

Inspired by the Admin post, I got to thinking about my favourite sewing magazines which led me to my absolutely favourite way to spend an evening (sorry, hubbie!) – glass of wine, log fire burning, stack of my vintage needlework magazines …. bliss!  My favourites are from the 50s as they seem to have so many useful projects and articles – sometimes there is even a great project tucked  away in a little half column at the back end of a magazine that I overlooked on the first ten or so read throughs.
I have been putting together as many copies of Needlework Illustrated from the late 40s/early 50s as I possibly can.  I have also got a
good (and growing) collection of 1970s Golden Hands magazines.  With regard to the earlier 30s, finding magazines is more difficult but I have a growing collection of needlework books from this era.  Of course, I am discovering echoes of earlier needlecraft projects everywhere.  Plus ca change and all that.  I am enjoying trying the vintage projects out and also creating my own interpretations of them.  I have started putting some of the instructions on my posts and hope to do lots more next year.  In the meantime, if you would like instructions to make a vintage peg doll fairy or a 50s style bow tie for a special night out, please visit my blog on the link below.
Enjoy your evenings everyone.  Cheers!

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As I am genetically unable to throw away even a scrap of vintage textile, I had to find a use for a rather tatty vintage 30s embroidered traycloth, even though it was frayed and torn.  I was pleased with this little Eastern slipper inspired gift boot.  More of my vintage needlecraft stockings over on my blog as well as the instructions for my peg doll fairies.  Happy festive sewing everyone!

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If you are like me, then you cannot ever throw a piece of textile away until you are totally, utterly, absolutely sure you will never, ever, cross-your-heart-and-hope-to-die find a use for it at some unknown future time and date.  I love re-using bits and bobs of discarded textiles to make cushions, patchworks, toys, bags or gifts.  So when I found an interesting vintage 50s bow tie with an unusual tri-fold design giving an aysmmetric bow, it didn’t take me long to decide to unpick it, see how it was made & replicate it using a redundant silk neck tie.

The project is now finished & there are instructions and a diagram on my blog if you would like to have a go at making your own bow ties for the upcoming winter party season.  I am going to be making more of these & trying out different shapes for the bows, plus I have tracked down a haberdasher in London who stocks special bow tie hooks & eyes so will be ordering some of those as well.  Cheers all.

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Found some interesting vintage 50s bow ties last week & was particularly intrigued by a “trifold” bow tie with asymmetric ends.  I figured this would be a good way to use up some redundant neckties made from beautiful silks & no longer worn.

I drafted a pattern & got stitching.  Here is the work in progress.

More photos will follow once this initial post is approved.

 

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