Bex

There’s no such thing as too much ric-rac!

When Abby from BlueGingerDoll showed me her latest skirt design I knew straightaway it would be right up my alley.  To me, it feels like a casual late-1940′s skirt, but it could be styled for a 1950s or 1960s look quite easily.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fit is really flattering, flared enough to be comfortable but not so flared that it will fly up in a stiff breeze. I love the popped pockets, and chose the plain waist band.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This polka-dotted quilter’s cotton has been waiting for the right project for a year, and I trimmed the skirt with ric-rac around the pockets and waist band.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The only problem I encountered was not having an amazing blouse to wear with my new skirt! It was time to try out Mail Order 4820 (from the late 50s I believe).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The western feel of the blouse pattern seemed the perfect fit for the Peggy skirt (with mandatory ric-rac trim again). I was suprised at how much ease was built into the blouse pattern (it doesnt show on the envelope) but at least it mean’t I didnt have to grade up a size.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does anyone find it hard to find the perfect blouse to wear with 1950′s circle skirts? I think this is the winner for me – light for summer, and good for dancing.

As always, more details are on my blog - and the Peggy Skirt is available on Blue Ginger Doll’s website here.

{ 10 comments }

V for Victory!

by Bex on September 22, 2013 · 11 comments

in 1940s,Mildly Insane Photo

I know it’s not technically sewing, but I thought some of you might like to see my finished 1940′s victory jumper…

The pattern is Patons 876, and was really enjoyable to knit!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Victory’ clothing was worn either before the War (WWII) ended to show support for the troops - or after, to celebrate the ‘Victory’ of War ending.

The skirt is made from Simplicity 3688 (1940s re-issue) using navy gaberdine – it’s actually my favourite suspender skirt with the suspenders removed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was abit touch and go with working out how much yarn I needed to make this – in the end it only took four balls of light grey, just over one ball of charcoal and half a ball of red.  Even though I love the jumper to death it’s not something I would make again – it’s very distinctive!

The full story and technical info is on my blog if anyone’s curious.

x

Bex

 

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I’m still plowing on with my attempt to have a completely wearable 1940s wardrobe – either by buying or making the outfits I want need.

And the latest gap to be filled – a 1940′s jumper dress!

1940s jumper dress pattern

The pattern is Mail Order 2082, and I (hesitantly) used the sweetheart neckline version, with heart patch pockets.

mail order 2082 sewing pattern 1940s jumper dress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was a bit unsure about the almost ‘twee’ detailing – I like feminine clothes but this is really femme! Heart pockets?

I think using navy gaberdine, a tough tailored fabric with this girlish pattern was a good match and the style is balanced in the middle.

Surprisingly, the pattern fitted really well with minimal adjustments. Normally I’ll have to fiddle with the armhole depth, waist height, dart placement – but not this time. Minimal amount of mods, listed on my blog.

bakelite 1940s

Sorry for the cat hair! I had to wrestle with my kitty before this photo...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The blouse is Smooth Sailing from Wearing History (my favourite shirt pattern), made from deco-print quilters cotton with vintage celluloid buttons.

One more photo because I’m so happy with how this has turned out!

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Continuing on in my attempt at a 1940′s wearable wardrobe – the ubiquitous 1940′s Lumber Jacket!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Really very happy with how this turned out (and really happy its stopped raining long enough so I can take photos)!

I used Simplicity 1535 (view 1) and black gaberdine.

The sleeves are full and glamorous, and the nipped waist is really flattering. Did I mention the pattern was easy to sew as well?

My favourite element would be the pointed cuffs, so very cute.

 

It was also sunny enough to take photos of Simplicity 1692 – View A.

While the jacket was made pretty much to-pattern, this one was modified to death. A full list is on my blog, but the main pattern change was to make the blouse back-buttoning like a traditional 1940′s blouse pattern.

I didn’t realise the pattern was a pull-over at first, and I don’t think the amount of ease called for was very flattering for an already plus-sized girl! I would definitely make this pattern again though, it’s great novelty print stash buster and the gathered neckline is really sweet.

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