allthepreciousthings

I fell in love with this machine, as soon as I saw it on ebay. The clean lines, the “atomic style” shape, unlike any other machine I’d seen before. Designed in Switzerland, and made in Holland, circa 1950s.

 

 For under $100 (including interstate postage), I think I got a bargain!

The machine arrived in its own little suitcase, decked out with leather straps inside to hold the pedal, the extension table and a cute little green bakelite box of attachments.


The Fridor Stitchmaster Merino

I spent a day cleaning her (the suitcase was full of rat droppings)…….

The machine case, sans rat poop


 

…..and now I own a seriously good – looking machine – even the foot pedal is attractive!

 

 


Even the foot pedal is attractive....

 

For a simple, straight-stitching machine, it has quite an array of extra feet, and dropping the feed-dogs is as simple as flicking a lever.

 

 

 

More photos on the patternpatter blog here (because I have yet to start my own!).

Bakelite light switch and Feed Dog Lever


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What to do with those precious left-over scraps of never-to-be-repeated vintage fabric?

I decided that a quilt would be a good way to preserve mine, rather than trying to incorporate them into garments that would probably not stand the test of time.

Starting with a small piece of ’60s cotton in orange/ brown/ yellow/ lime green, I added other fabrics from my stash of scraps until the mix was pleasing. I did need to supplement the vintage fabrics with some new patchwork cottons, to “fill in the gaps”.

I had a lovely ’70s flower-power single sheet, just perfect for the backing!

The 6 inch squares were machine stitched together, then hand basted to the batting and the sheet, ready to hand-quilt. This took over a year – I thought it would never end….but finally, it’s finished!

Hand quilting

I’m glad I hand quilted, even though it was a pain, I’m happy with the results.

Vintage sheet for backing

The finished quilt

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Little Betty toy sewing machine

I bought this adorable “Little Betty” toy 50s sewing machine on ebay this week, because for $25,I couldn’t resist it!

After playing with it for a bit, I was able to thread the top of the machine, and by cranking the handle, I got some sort of “sewing” happening. (Yes, it has a proper needle, and the foot raises and lowers like a “real one). Only problem is, it looks like something has to be done underneath, in lieu of a bobbin arrangement, and this is the part I can’t work out. No instructions came with the machine, and it is made in Britain.

top side of work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know, it’s actually just an ornament for my sewing room, but it’s bugging me!

I’m wondering if anyone else has come across one of these, and knows how to thread it?

underside of work

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Here’s a bustier/ bra top I made yesterday from Simplicity 3250. I made it from a 50 cent remnant of luxury satin, found in the $1 bin at my favourite fabric store!

Very comfortable to wear, it’s a one way stretch satin. I thought I’d be clever and sew the 2 ends together at the neck, saving me another set of buttons to wrangle with. The significance of those buttons becomes clear when putting the bustier on – it’s OK, I just have to get hubby to do me up at the back!

Anyway, it was a fun project.

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