What’s your 1947 color?

by luxperdiem on March 6, 2012 · 16 comments

in 1940s,Vintage Sewing

I picked up a great little vintage sewing book a few years ago when I had just started started sewing. This week was actually the first time I flipped through it. It’s from 1947 and is full of really awesome vintage sewing tips. Not to mention these great color diagrams based on hair and eye color! Wouldn’t they be fun to do as a colorĀ paletteĀ for a wardrobe challenge? You don’t really even have to stick to “your colors”! I’d fall under Brown hair and brown eyes right now since I’ve been sporting my natural locks for a bit. I’ve been black hair and brown eyes, and auburn and red though too!
I’m hoping you all find these as interesting as I did!

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{ 16 comments… read them below or add one }

Marie March 6, 2012 at 10:09 am

What cute colour diagrams! They would definitely be fun as wardrobe challenge!

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mideva March 6, 2012 at 11:03 am

love it,now I want to go to spoonflower and make some fabric for a blue eyed redhead.

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Roxy March 6, 2012 at 11:43 am

Hey where’s the one for brown hair- green eyes!

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Evie March 6, 2012 at 12:44 pm

That’s just what I was thinking! ;)

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amonik March 7, 2012 at 5:55 am

Apparently they hadn’t invented green eyes in the 40′s ;-) I’m one of those people who think it’s all about skin tone, so not that bothered.

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Lizzy March 6, 2012 at 12:14 pm

Nice diagram! I am in the brunettes, black hair brown eyes AND I like those colors :)

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LBC March 6, 2012 at 12:15 pm

I’m somewhere between brown hair, blue eyes and auburn hair, brown eyes. I’m off-colored all around: Brown hair . . . with a slight reddish cast, and blue-gray eyes. I can wear pretty much any shade of green, no matter how acid or olive or mossy.

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Athene March 6, 2012 at 4:43 pm

That’s so funny – I am blonde/blue and I absolutely wear that color palette (with the exception of pink – too fluffy for me!)

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Jessamyn March 6, 2012 at 4:57 pm

That is really cute! Too bad the Grey Hair, Brown Eyes pallette looks more like the colors I know through long trial and error work on me than my actual natural scheme of (Almost) Black Hair, Brown Eyes. I guess I’m just ahead of my time.

In my experience skin tone is more important than eye color. All those yellow-greens just make me look … yellow-green. And they’re so popular right now. Sigh.

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Jo March 6, 2012 at 9:23 pm

this is fascinating. I’ve got black and white hair and hazel/brown eyes (each eye has hazel near the iris and brown around it — not one of each!). The colors for black and white hair hazel eyes and gray hair and brown eyes are pretty much the colors I wears. Except for that icky camel color.

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Teresa March 6, 2012 at 9:54 pm

Gorgeous! I love these and think they’d be perfect for doing a wardrobe challenge. You should do it! :)

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Melbourne Belle March 6, 2012 at 10:02 pm

As a RedHead I am delighted with the range of options in the book. We are so often overlooked in ‘fashion’ magazines. They address blondes and brunettes but forget the reds. Thank you so much for sharing.
I’m Auburn & Brown, and I wear all those colours regularly.
I love the hair styles too!

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Elli C March 7, 2012 at 7:44 am

Auburn/ brown and green eyes, was hoping they might have been kind to us then, since now apparently every colour in shops is designed for the permi-tanned – a very strange look for those of a more, ahem, celtic, skin tone!!

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Isis March 13, 2012 at 2:06 pm

Absolutely wonderful! Thank you!

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Katherine March 13, 2012 at 2:23 pm

Great post! I have red hair and green eyes, so I wonder what they’d recommend for me. The closest match is for red hair and blue eyes and those colors are not the ones that I think I look the best in.

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Rachel R. April 7, 2013 at 9:45 pm

I thought it was a little strange that there are no green eyes (and only the black/white- and blonde-haired get hazel). Still fascinating, though – thanks for sharing!

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