Jo Ann Fabrics: Improvising an original Girl Scout uniform

by LittleBlackCar

in 1910s,1920s,Children,Modern Patterns

This just popped up on my Facebook feed.  I was a Girl Scout for about a week so I could go to camp with my cousin Mary, but my mother was a die-hard Scout for fifteen years.  My brother considers himself a third-generation Eagle Scout because Mom was a Curved Bar (highest rank at the time) and her dad was an Eagle.

Anyway, Jo Ann Fabrics posted a .pdf on how to improvise an original 1910′s – 1920′s Girl Scout uniform using New Look 6004 for the skirt and Simplicity 8523 for the top, with long sleeves and middy color self-drafted.  It does say that this project is “Level 3: Experience Necessary” as it’s a little bit complex.

The finished project (from Jo Ann. I haven't tried it).

It might a be a fun project for avid Scouters out there, though.

Here is an authentic uniform, circa 1925, on at the Minnesota Historical Society.

This photo is labeled “mid-1920′s” but it looks closer to late-teens/early 1920′s to me.

 

This post was written by...

– who has written 36 posts on WeSewRetro.com.

LittleBlackCar's posts / LittleBlackCar's website

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Nona Eleanor March 12, 2012 at 9:07 pm

I was in Girl Scouts for twelve years. What a fun idea!
Here’s a random bit of history about girl scout uniforms. Up until World Word II, girl scout uniforms shared many of the same characteristics and colors as US navy uniforms. They where navy blue, sported sailor-style collars, and some carried similar navy-style insignia. During WWII, uniforms changed to have a more army look; they were green had a more tailored look and military-style insignia, such as pins and badges. For the most part, girl scout uniforms have maintained this army look until the last 30 years or so.

Reply

LittleBlackCar March 13, 2012 at 7:53 am

Actually, I was wondering when they gave up the blue color! Thanks for the info.

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: