Floral Rizzo Blouse

by So Zo on March 20, 2012 · 5 comments

in 1950s,Blouses,Vintage Sewing

Hi peops! I check this site regularly, but haven’t contributed since it moved house. Really happy to be posting here today. Thanks everyone for sharing your work, it makes for SUCH inspirational reading. I’d like to show you a recent project I made using a vintage sewing pattern, vintage fabric and vintage buttons.

Pattern Description:

I finally got round to making up the blouse I’d confessed to having cut out months ago in my recent Sewing Pattern Hoard post. I made View B, a sleeveless winged collar blouse with tucks for shaping at the waist. I was drawn to it because I could imagine Rizzo from Grease wearing it, but I also feel it’s something Kitty & Daisy might rock too. This pattern is dated 1956.

Pattern Sizing:

This is a 34″ bust pattern. I was fully expecting to have to let it out around the waist but actually is was fine PLUS I’m wearing a vest underneath in these images (what? It’s still March and where I live, it’s damn chilly at times!).

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

I’ll let you be the judge of that!

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Well, in the instruction were sparce, in that wonderful way vintage sewing patterns usually are. But yes, it was very easy and quick to put together after I’d faffed around with the pattern and cut it out.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

Rizzo would wear this. And it rocks hard with my thrifted red cardi.

Fabric Used:

Some amazing vintage printed cotton with an almost Hawaiian floral design that I scored at work. This fabric is actually quite faded in places, so not really appropriate for the range we make at work. I’m actually quite happy the fabric was faded because I think it gives it more of an authentic vintage feel. The orangey-red plastic buttons are also vintage and have lived in my button stash for an age.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

Well, I folded 2cms out along the waistline of the bodice to account for my short-waistedness and that worked very well as the tucks now hit my natural waistline as they should. I think I’m going to do this alteration as standard on every pattern I make from now on. I also lowered the armholes because I find vintage patterns can be very restrictive around the armholes and neckholes. I then had to redraft the facings of course. I’m pleased I made that alteration but I think maybe I lowered it a little two much in the end.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yep. I would like to make another in black with the leopard print buttons I bought at Sew Over It in South London.

Conclusion:

I’m a big fan of this blouse. I’m not sure how much wear it’ll get due to it’s sleeveless nature, but it’s actually very comfortable (I think I had a nap in it during the day!) and it seeing it makes me feel very summery.

For more of my creations and more info about this creation, please head over to my blog. I’ll get the kettle on!

This post was written by...

– who has written 5 posts on WeSewRetro.com.

So Zo's posts / So Zo's website

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Katherine March 20, 2012 at 4:22 pm

Awesome – I especially love it paired with the cardi.

Great to see first posts from people whose blogs I’m a fan of. Glad to have you with us :D

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PepperReed March 20, 2012 at 6:26 pm

Super cute! I keep thinking I need to make some of these for summer, so thanks for the nudge… and YAY! for Kitty, Daisy & Lewis! They’re Awesome!!

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ooobop March 20, 2012 at 6:39 pm

Absolutely lovely. Fits you perfectly. I recently made one similar with sleeves but I love how yours looks without. Hopefully my pattern can adapt. Thank you for sharing :-)

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FiftiesFrocks March 21, 2012 at 8:30 pm

I love this top. The style is fantastic on you and the fabric is beautiful. I hope that it’s warm enough for you to wear it a lot!

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Claudia March 23, 2012 at 2:17 pm

Your blouse looks fabulous on you. Thanks for sharing.

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