Child’s Play

by Time and again on March 9, 2012 · 8 comments

in 1930s,1940s,Children

The Kindergarten that my children attended is turning 75 this year and the director of the kindy has asked me to sew some clothes that the children might have worn when it opened in 1937. These will be worn by children at a street parade in our city in May.  I thought it might be fun to have them dressed in sepia type colours (representing the ‘Then’), as they will be leading the rest of the kindy (dressed brightly, representing the ‘Now’)

So far I have sewn: Du Barry 1235B

and McCall 6179

Little boy’s trousers are surprisingly complex – these have a little fly opening at the c/f, but actually have the closures (to get in and out of them) at the sides. I am looking forward to doing some other styles of these trousers to see if the other pattern companies instructions are less confusing.

Two down, only a couple more to go…..

 

 

This post was written by...

– who has written 5 posts on WeSewRetro.com.

I like to make things. It makes me happy.

Time and again's posts / Time and again's website

{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

Julia March 9, 2012 at 7:06 pm

Those are so cute!! Awesome. I made little boy shorts using a vintage pattern last year and I found the whole construction very confusing as well, there was one piece that I never found out what it was for.

Reply

lizzy March 9, 2012 at 8:23 pm

So cute!!!

Reply

Ange March 10, 2012 at 4:21 am

I love them! I want a pair of the girls shorts my size :)

Reply

Yasmine March 10, 2012 at 9:34 am

Those are fab! Doing Sepia toned “Then” clothes is brilliant. Thanks for posting.

Reply

tina vines March 10, 2012 at 2:03 pm

so adorable!!

Reply

Dawn March 11, 2012 at 2:54 am

Too cute!

Reply

Katherine March 11, 2012 at 12:17 pm

The idea of doing them in sepia tones is awesome – it’s going to be completely charming.

Reply

LittleBlackCar March 12, 2012 at 10:41 am

Those rock! The dress is adorable, but it’s just as much fun to see the boy’s clothing since we don’t often see it made up.

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: